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Which clippings match 'Database As Cultural Form' keyword pg.1 of 2
11 DECEMBER 2013

Nicolas Bourriaud: Postproduction

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TAGS

amateur cultural productionartistsboundary-crossing • collective story • consumerismcontemporary artcritical discoursecultural and social relationscultural technology • culture of use • database as cultural formDIYDIY craftsDJforms • historised • Hunter College • Jerome Sans • Ludwig WittgensteinMarcel Duchamp • network on signs • new audio theory • new modes of production • newness • Nicky Enright • Nicolas Bourriaud • paths through culture • post • post-productionproduser • programme forms • protocols of usereinterpretationrelational aestheticsremix culturesamplerscriptible • site of navigation • social and cultural forms • sociality • tabula rasa • the new • theory of substantial formstoolsusevisual artwork of art • zone of activity

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
09 DECEMBER 2013

Goldsmiths Department of Art MA: Computational Aesthetics

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TAGS

2013algorithmic architecturecomputational aestheticscomputational arts • computational character • computational ordering • computational structures • computational systemscomputer artconceptual artcritical discoursedatabase as cultural formdigital aestheticsdigital artfine artGoldsmiths College (University of London)information systems • logico-mathematical means • Maria Beatrice Fazi • mathematicsmathesis • Matt Fuller • mediality • medium specificitymodern artmodes of existenceorder of thingsordering • present art • programmatic declaration • rule-based worksoftware studiessupermarketssystematisationtheory of substantial formsvideo lecturevisual art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

The Computational Turn: Thinking About The Digital Humanities

"first–wave digital humanities involved the building of infrastructure in the studying of humanities texts through digital repositories, text markup, etc., whereas second–wave digital humanities expands the notional limits of the archive to include digital works, and so bring to bear the humanities' own methodological toolkits to look at 'born–digital' materials, such as electronic literature (e–lit), interactive fiction (IF), web–based artefacts, and so forth."

(David M. Berry, 2011)

Berry, D. M. (2011). "The Computational Turn: Thinking About The Digital Humanities." Culture Machine 12.

TAGS

archivearchivesborn-digital • born-digital materials • building infrastructure • database as cultural form • David Berry • digital archivedigital heritagedigital humanitiesdigital repositories • digital works • e-lit • electronic literature • first-wave digital humanities • humanitiesIFinteractive fictionmark-up • methodological toolkits • notional limits of the archive • second-wave digital humanities • structured repository • studying humanities texts • text markup • webweb archiveweb technologies • web-based artefacts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 APRIL 2012

Syllabus for Information Aesthetics at UIC School of Art and Design

"This studio course investigates the database as cultural form (Manovich, 2001), in the context of data visualization, digital fabrication, and computational aesthetics. Traditionally viewed as a tool for scientific reasoning and data exploration, information visualization has emerged as an artistic practice, propelled by the democratization of data sources and the advancement of computer graphics. The massive amount of data collected and disseminated online constitutes the basis for this course. Participants will be introduced to the basic skills for developing creative projects in two–, three–, and four dimensions, such as indexes, graphs, prints, digitally fabricated objects and maps. Students will also become familiar with the a basic vocabulary to co–create and collaborate with professionals in future contexts.

The course focuses on current standards for web development and mobile applications, including HTML5, CSS3, jQuery, PHP, MySQL, and Processing(.js). Fundamentals in XHTML, Cascading Style Sheets, and programming are beneficial, but not required. Throughout the course, students are asked to utilize the class blog to collect and share resources, collaboratively collecting interesting data sources towards a final project. A series of presentations, screenings, readings, and discussions will expose students to creative projects and artworks in the context of information visualization. Each student selects a research topic followed by an in–class research presentation (see schedule). Participants will also present their work during class critiques and interdisciplinary workshops to receive qualitative feedback from the instructor(s) and the class."

(Daniel Sauter, University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Art and Design, Fall 2011)

Fig.1 Matt Wizinsky (2011). "Chicago unDensity", University of Illinois at Chicago.

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TAGS

2011 • cascading style sheets • Chicago • Chicago unDensity • class blog • class critiques • collaboration • collaboratively collecting • College of Architecture and the Arts • communication design educationcomputational aestheticscomputer graphics • course curriculum • creative projectsCSSCSS3cultural formscurriculum designdata • data exploration • data visualisationdatabase as cultural form • democratisation of data sources • design studiodigital fabrication • digitally fabricated objects • HTML5 • Illinois • information aestheticsinformation graphicsinformation visualisationinteractive tool • interdisciplinary workshops • jQueryLev Manovichmapmobile applicationsMySQLPHPProcessing (software)programming • qualitative feedback • research topicSchool of Art and Designstudio coursestudio programmesyllabus • tools for scientific reasoning • UIC • University of Illinois • University of Illinois at Chicago • visual vocabularyvisualisationweb developmentXHTML

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MARCH 2011

The process of conceptualisation can be seen as an emergent process that involves the constant re-projection of prior understanding onto new and changing circumstances

"An inspiring new website for digital culture and creative practices has been created by School of Art & Design academic Simon Perkins. The Folksonomy – www.folksonomy.co – is a knowledge commons and social bookmarking tool for digital culture and creative practice. The brainchild of Simon Perkins, as part of his research, the Folksonomy simplifies the process of clipping references and features photographs, videos and published documents. The Folksonomy is simultaneously a device for engaging with and a product of digital culture. It acts as a teaching tool for supporting the generation of ideas and digital culture creative practice. The research project is of a broader practice that extends from creative technology and design teaching and is focused on the nature of knowledge construction within digital culture environments. One of the unique aspects of the site is the way content is categorised, as it simultaneously belongs to multiple and sometimes contradictory categories, encouraging the viewer to make new discoveries. This sits in stark contrast to the more traditional logic conventionally employed by libraries and computer operating systems where books and files are organised according to a linear, centralised and hierarchical form. Simon says: 'The process of conceptualisation can be seen as an emergent process that involves the constant re–projection of prior understanding onto new and changing circumstances. The Folksonomy tool aims to support this type of tactical interaction through its use of linking and association.'"

(Steve Goodhew, 2010, p.140–141)

Fig.1 Simon Perkins (2010) 'Stellarscope Constellations'.

2). Steve Goodhew (ed.) (2010). 'OPEN: 50 RESEARCH PROJECTS exploring the boundaries of creativity', College of Art & Design and Built Environment, Nottingham Trent University.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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