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05 MARCH 2016

Simon McBurney: Complicite’s The Encounter

"Simon McBurney transports us into the humid depths of the Amazon, his storytelling served by the enveloping presence of binaural technology.

After premiering at Edinburgh International Festival this August, Complicite's The Encounter is currently play a sold-out run on our stage. We're delighted to support Complicite in their first live-stream as they broadcast The Encounter live online from our theatre to your home by watching through our website on Tuesday 1 March, 7.30pm GMT.

Audiences must wear headphones to watch the live stream, or the effect of the binaural recording will be lost. Any headphones will work, but playing the film out of speakers will not give the same effect. The live stream is free to watch, and will also be available to watch on demand for a week after the live broadcast, until Tuesday 8 March."

Streamed live on 1 Mar 2016

Watch The Encounter (sold out) live from the Barbican, London until 8 March. Headphones MUST be worn to experience the show's binaural sound design (3D audio). Directed and performed by Simon McBurney.

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2016 • 3D audio • Amazon rainforest • ambiophonics • Barbican Centre • binaural recording • binaural sound design • binaural technology • Complicites The Encounter • dummy head recording • Edinburgh International Festival • enveloping presence • headphones • immersive audio • immersive experience • immersive surround sound • Interaural Time Difference (ITD) • live audiovisual performancelive performance • live stream • mannequin head • Simon McBurney • spatialised sound performance • stereo audio • stereo effect • stereo sound sensation • stereophonic sound • storytellingtheatrical performance • three dimensional acoustic experience

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 SEPTEMBER 2013

Inside Out of Mind: ethnographic research catalyst for theatre project

"Based on extraordinary and extensive ethnographic research, Inside Out of Mind offers moving insight into the mysterious domain of dementia; a world of medical magical realism peopled with puppets and performers in pursuit of a lost man in pursuit of lost love. A darkly comic and empathic tale."

(Meeting Ground Theatre Company)

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Anna Mottram • arts and sciencesdementiadissemination through performanceethnographic researchethnographically informed study • Health Care Assistant (HCA) • healthcare • Holly-Robyn Harrison • hospital treatment • hospital wards • Inside Out of Mind (play) • Jarrod Cooke • Jim Findley • Joanna Macleod • Joanne Lloyd • Justine Schneider • Kezia Scales • Lakeside Arts Centre (Nottingham) • Lily Lowe-Myers • Maurice Roeves • Maxine Finch • medical research • Meeting Ground (theatre company) • NHS • no name • Nottinghamnursepatient carereality as processresearch disseminationresearch project • Sean Myatt • Simon Bailey • Tanya Myers • theatre • theatre company • theatre projectstheatrical performancetheatrical playtrauma • Ulrike Johannson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 OCTOBER 2012

Erving Goffman: backstage and frontstage behaviour

"Throughout our society there tends to be one informal or backstage language of behaviour, and another language of behaviour for occasions when a performance is being presented. The backstage language consists of reciprocal first–naming, co–operative decision–making, profanity, open sexual remarks, elaborate griping, smoking, rough informal dress, ' sloppy' sitting and standing posture, use of dialect or sub–standard speech, mumbling and shouting, playful aggressivity and 'kidding,' inconsiderateness for the other in minor but potentially symbolic acts, minor physical self–involvements such as humming, whistling, chewing, nibbling, belching, and flatulence. The frontstage behaviour language can be taken as the absence (and in some sense the opposite) of this. In general, then, backstage conduct is one which allows minor acts which might easily be taken as symbolic of intimacy and disrespect for others present and for the region, while front region conduct is one which disallows such potentially offensive behaviour." [1]

(Erving Goffman, 1959, p.78)

[1] It may be noted that backstage behaviour has what psychologists might call a 'regressive' character. The question, of course, is whether a backstage gives individuals an opportunity to regress or whether regression, in the clinical sense, is backstage conduct invoked on inappropriate occasions for motives that are not socially approved.

Goffman, E. (1959). "The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life", University of Edinburgh Social Sciences Research Centre.

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1959 • appropriated metaphor • backstage • backstage behaviour • backstage conduct • backstage language • belching • chewing • co-operative decision-making • cooperative decision-making • cultural beliefs • cultural normscultural valuesdecision makingdialectdisrespectdisrespect for others • dramatism • dramaturgical analysis • dramaturgical sociology • dramaturgy • dramaturgy (sociology) • elaborate griping • Erving Goffmaneveryday lifeflatulence • front region conduct • frontstage behaviour language • human interactionshummingidentity performance • inconsiderateness • informal behaviour • informal language • Kenneth Burke • kidding • language of behaviour • microsociological accounts • minor acts • minor physical self-involvements • mumbling • nibbling • offensive behaviour • open sexual remarks • playful aggressivity • profanity • reciprocal first-naming • regression • regressive character • rough informal dress • shouting • sloppiness • sloppy sitting • smokingsocial behavioursocial interaction • social occasion • sociological perspective • standing posture • study of social interaction • sub-standard speech • symbolic acts • symbolic behavioursymbolic interactionism • symbolic of intimacy • theatrical metaphor • theatrical performance • whistling

CONTRIBUTOR

Barbara Adkins
14 APRIL 2012

Practising Theatre History as Research

"Much current scholarship in the field of Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, including my own, focuses on the actual performance of plays in their own or later periods, regarding the texts that survive as, in different ways, blueprints for performance, and exploring them in the context of their performance spaces, actors and theatre–practice and of other agencies such as audiences that impact upon those texts in performance. My own research in these areas is largely conducted through practice.

But let me just sketch a brief background. In 1998, a sea–change occurred in the lives of arts (as opposed to humanities) researchers in the UK, with the creation of the Arts & Humanities Research Board (now Council) which, for the first time, funded practice–led research in the creative arts. I cannot stress too heavily the impact this had on the landscape of research in the performing arts.

That's not to say, of course, that research through practice had not been conducted before then. If I take my own department at Bristol as an example, scholars such as Glynne Wickham, Richard Southern and Neville Denny were experimenting from the early 1950s by staging medieval and early modern plays, and using their findings in their published work.

But the arrival of the AHRB not only provided funding for practice–led research in the academy, but in so doing, confirmed it as being as valid and – not to be underestimated – as respectable as research conducted through more traditional or conventional means. And – a point to which I shall return – it opened up debates not only on how such research might most profitably be conducted, but how it might be disseminated in forms other than the books or journal articles that had predominated – and be disseminated, in fact, through the practice/performance itself."

(Martin White)

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1950s1998AHRBAHRCArts and Humanities Research BoardArts and Humanities Research Council • blueprints for performance • Bristolconducting researchcontribution to knowledge • Cornish • Cornish Ordinalia • Cornwallcreative artsdesign researchdesign researcherdissemination through performance • dissemination through practice • early modern period • Elizabethan drama • fourteenth century • funding for practice-led research • Glynne Wickham • history of theatre • Jacobean drama • journal articlesmedieval • medieval mystery plays • model of enquiry • Neville Denny • Ordinalia • Origo Mundi • Passio Christi • passion of Christperformance researchperformance spacesperforming arts • plays • practice as research in performancepractice-led research • practising theatre • publishing and disseminationresearch dissemination • research in the performing arts • research scholarshipresearch through practice • researchers in the UK • Resurrexio Domini • Richard Southern • staging • surviving texts • texts in performance • the academytheatre • theatre audiences • theatre history • theatre practice • theatrical performancetheoretical contextUKvalid scholarship

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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