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12 SEPTEMBER 2014

Automatic Art: human and machine processes that make art

Exhibition: 3 July–10 September 2014, GV Art gallery, London, 49 Chiltern Street, Marylebone, London W1U 6LY.

"This exhibition presents 50 years of British art that is generated from strict procedures. The artists make their work by following rules or by writing computer programs. They range from system–based paintings and drawings to evolving computer generated images."

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2014algorithmic art • Anthony Hill • Automatic Art (exhibition) • boredomresearch • British artchance artcomputer artcomputer art practicecomputer generated artcomputerised artdesign formalismdigital art exhibitiondigital artworkdigital materialism • Dominic Boreham • Ernest Edmonds • exhibitiongenerative artgenerative designgouache • GV Art Gallery • Harold Cohen • Jeffrey Steele • John Carter • Julie Freeman • Kenneth Martin • latticemachine-made • Malcolm Hughes • Michael Kidner • Nathan Cohen • orderly patternsorganisational processPaul Brown • Paul Smith (boredomresearch) • Peter Lowe • procedural artprocess artrule-based work • Sean Clark • simple rulesStephen BellStephen Scrivener • Steve Sproates • Susan Tebby • system-based drawing • system-based painting • systems art • Terry Pope • Trevor Clarke • Vicky Isley (boredomresearch) • visual abstractionvisual art • William Latham

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MARCH 2014

Work begins on the world's first 3D-printed house

"At the centre of the process is the KamerMaker, or Room Builder, a scaled–up version of an open–source home 3D–printer, developed with Dutch firm Ultimaker. It uses the same principle of extruding layers of molten plastic, only enlarged about 10 times, from printing desktop trinkets to chunks of buildings up to 2x2x3.5m high.

For a machine–made material, the samples have an intriguingly hand–made finish. In places, it looks like bunches of black spaghetti. There are lumps and bumps, knots and wiggles, seams where the print head appears to have paused or slipped, spurting out more black goo than expected.

'We're still perfecting the technology,' says Heinsman. The current material is a bio–plastic mix, usually used as an industrial adhesive, containing 75% plant oil and reinforced with microfibres. They have also produced tests with a translucent plastic and a wood fibre mix, like a liquid form of MDF that can later be sawn and sanded. 'We will continue to test over the next three years, as the technology evolves,' she says. 'With a second nozzle, you could print multiple materials simultaneously, with structure and insulation side by side.'"

(Oliver Wainwright, 28 March 2014, The Guardian)

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20143D printing • 3D-printed house • Amsterdamarchitecture • biodegradable materials • black spaghetti • brickbuilding process • canal • canal house • computer-controlled gantry • contour crafting • cyberarchitecturedesign futuresdigital fabricationdigital forming • Dus Architects • dwellingfabrication • gable • honeycomb lattice • honeycomb structurehouse • housebuilding • housing • Janjaap Ruijssenaars • KamerMake • lattice • liquorice • machine-made material • made on-demandmanufacturingMDFmobius stripnew crafts • novelty technology • oozingplant oilplastic • plastic facade • print structures • printingrapid manufacturing • Room Builder • synthetic sandstone • technological developmentsThe Guardian • treacle • Ultimaker • wood fibre

CONTRIBUTOR

Linda Carroli
14 APRIL 2012

Achim Menges: Architecture and Product Design Research

"Architecture as a material practice is predominately based on an approach to design that is characterised by prioritising the elaboration of form over its subsequent materialisation. Since the Renaissance the increasing division between processes of design and making has led to the age–long development and increasing dependence on representational tools intended for explicit, scalar geometric descriptions that at the same time serve as instructions for the translation from drawing to building. Inevitably, and with few exceptions, even in today's digital practice architects embrace design methods that epitomize the hierarchical separation of form definition and materialisation.

The research of the Institute for Computational Design explores an alternative, morphogenetic approach to design that unfolds morphological complexity and performative capacity from material constituents without differentiating between formation and materialisation processes. This requires an understanding of form, material, structure and environment not as separate aspects, but rather as complex interrelations that are embedded in and explored through integral computational processes.

The notion of material system constitutes one central aspect of this research. Material system does not only refer to the material constituents of a building alone, but rather describes, in a system–theoretical sense, the complex reciprocity between materiality, form, structure and space, the related processes of production and assembly, and the multitude of performative effects that emanate from the interaction with environmental influences and forces. This conceptualization of material systems enables the utilization of computational design processes. The ability of computation to simultaneously do both, stochastically derive and systemically process complex datasets within a defined or evolving constraint space, can be utilized to explore a material system's performative capacity within its materially determined limits. Furthermore, continuously informing the form generation with different modes of computational analysis enables a direct link between the ontogeny, the history of structural changes of an individual, and its interaction with external forces and energy respectively, that is its ecological embedding. This enables to conceive of material systems as the synergetic outcome of calibrating and balancing multiple influencing variables and divergent design criteria, which always already include the interaction with the system–external environment. The resultant environmental modulations can now be understood as highly specific patterns in direct relation to the material interventions from which they originate.

The design of space, structure and climate can be synthesized in one integral design process."

(Achim Menges, Achimmenges.net)

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Achim Menges • architectsarchitectural conjecturearchitecture • bifurcation between theory and practice • building • complex datasets • computational design • computational design processes • computational processes • cultural technologydesign and makingdesign methods • design of space • design processdesign researchdigital practice • elaboration of form • environmental influences • environmental modulations • European Renaissanceform • form definition and materialisation • formation and materialisation • hierarchical separation • history of structural change • Institute for Computational Design • latticematerialmaterial interventionsmaterial practice • material systems • materialisationmateriality • materially determined limits • modes of computational analysis • morphogenetic approach to design • morphological complexity • ontogenesis • performative capacity • performative effects • product designproduction and assembly • representational tools • scalar geometric descriptions • space • stochastic • structure • synergetic outcome • synergy • system-theoretical sense • systemically process • theory and practice • translation from drawing to building • wood • wood lattice

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JUNE 2005

Semi-lattice relationships through RSS aggregation

"With the use of RSS it is possible not only for blogs to exist in a semi–lattice relationship online but also for users to access their information in a semi–latticed sense where RSS feeds can be rearranged, ordered or, perhaps most notably, received in what the co–creator of RSS, Dave Winer, calls a 'river of news' aggregator [Winer, 2005]. As a result of this ease of management of large amounts of information and complete control over subscription to that, the number of potential interrelationships between writer and reader is almost unlimited and drawn from control being centred on the user."

(James Farmer 2005, Blogtalk Downunder)

Proceedings of the Blogtalk Downunder Conerence, 19–22 May 2005, Sydney, Australia.

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2005aggregationAustralia • Blogtalk Downunder Conference • Dave WinerDeakin Universitye-learningeducation content syndicationfeedsJames Farmerlatticeonline learning • river of news • RSSsemilattice
11 NOVEMBER 2003

Soda Constructor: Synthetic Pets

sodaplay was devised by a london based company called Soda Creative Ltd. we made it as part of our ongoing ideas generation, research and development process.

[OnLine virtual creatures that interact with/within their environment according to their creature–type definition and user–defined parameters]

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algorithmalgorithmic artanimationauthoring toolautomataautonomouschoreographycodecomputational aestheticscreaturegenerativegeometrygestureinteractioninteractivelatticemovementNeal Whitenew media • pets • puppetrobot • Soda Constructor • Sodaplay • synthetic-lifetoolwireframe
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