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Which clippings match 'Design And Making' keyword pg.1 of 2
04 OCTOBER 2014

Commonplace objects used to engage learners in design thinking

"In this studio paper students will be introduced to creative and analytical thinking skills, idea generation and visualisation common to art and design practice. They will begin to acquire specific techniques, skills and processes in art–making across different media. They will learn to discuss and evaluate their work and the work of their peers."

[First year students undertaking coursework as part of the Studio I (Art Lab) paper at Massey University College of Creative Arts in Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 AUGUST 2014

Eduardo Paolozzi: Turkische Musik, 1974

"Eduardo Paolozzi's work often, as in the Türkische Musik series, may be printed in different color schemes or on different papers. All these elements combine to suggest that the image is often discovered in the act of creating it; the artist's role is integrally balanced between active calculation and chance. No longer confined to a single plan, the artist–printmaker and his work signify an exciting new order of print– making, one in which technological expertise becomes a useful vehicle for personal expression."

(Georgette Lee, 1986)

Precision of Image: Technology in Printed Art : 20 April – 7 September, 1986, The Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery at Syracuse University in Syracuse.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2014

Diagram for the structure of teaching at the Bauhaus / Schema zum Aufbau der Lehre am Bauhaus

"The individual elements of the Bauhaus teachings are inscribed in a circular shape. The areas of the preliminary course and building are conspicuously delineated from the core of the instruction–the workshops with their accompanying subjects–by a drawn double ring. This is due to the special position that both of these teaching areas occupied: In order to even be accepted to the study programme at the Bauhaus, it was necessary to successfully complete the preliminary course. And only the most talented students could qualify for participation in the building theory course. The schema also indicates the length of the respective educational units."

Fig.1 Walter Gropius, Schema zum Aufbau der Lehre am Bauhaus, 1922, veröffentlicht in: Staatliches Bauhaus Weimar, 1919–1923 Bauhaus–Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung, Berlin.

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TAGS

1922apprenticeshipart and design educationatelier methodBauhaus DessauBauhaus SchoolBauhaus WeimarBauhaus-KolloquiumBerlin • circular disk • colour theorycourse modulescraft and designcurricula designcurriculumcurriculum designdesign and makingdesign curriculumdesign educationdesign formalismdesign school • design workshops • hierarchical model • learning and teachinglearning through practicematerial experimentationmaterial interventionsmaterial practice • Museum fur Gestaltung • programme modulesschema • Schema zum Aufbau der Lehre am Bauhaus • Staatliches Bauhaus • studio approachstudio coursestudio practice • study programme • Walter Gropiusworkshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 DECEMBER 2012

Privileging the collective: the tradition of the atelier method in art and design education

"Art and design education has broadly settled on two categories of pedagogical frameworks, both evolutions from historical precedents. The first of these categories is driven by the spirit of the 'design collective', and comprises the art school studio or atelier model. This was established by the private Florentine art schools of the renaissance from around the 15th Century (King, 2003), always with a focus on making as well as learning from the group – from both peers and Masters. Later, this model of learning through practice carried over to the art schools of England: in his 1858 inaugural address for the Cambridge School of Art, John Ruskin (Ruskin, 1858) spoke about the relative futility of formal teaching per se and instead the pressing need for students to learn by repeated and applied making. For applied craft and design, this studio approach was the method under the influential Bauhaus School (1919–1933) in Germany (Droste, 2005). The second category derives from the teaching of industrial arts and is typically driven by the far greater student volume processing needs of the institution. This category comprises the 'hot desking' or increasingly the 'no–desking' model, with large taught classes in lecture format, and occasional group tutorials. Such a model is often the norm for universities' academic courses. The model spread to the creative courses that were more typically offered by polytechnics in the UK. The first polytechnic dates back to the early nineteenth century (Fox, 1832–1854), although most were established in the 1960's with a remit of applied education in industry and science for work. In many countries, the term 'technical college' is the same as a polytechnic – in both the UK and Australia, many of these colleges converted into universities in the last 30 years."

(Ashley Hall and Tom Barker, 2010)

Hall, A. and T. Barker (2010). "Design collectives in education: evaluating the atelier format and the use of teaching narrative for collective cultural and creative learning, and the subsequent impact on professional practice". In Alternative Practices in Design: Past Present and Future. H. Edquist and L. Vaughan. Melbourne, Victoria, RMIT University: Design Research Institute.

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TAGS

2010academic coursesapplied craft and designapprenticeshipart and design educationart schools • artists studio • atelier methodatelier modelbaseroomBauhaus School • Cambridge School of Art • craft and designcraft skills • creative courses • creativity skillsdesign and makingdesign collectivedesign educationdesign studio educationdistance learningEuropean RenaissanceFlorence • Florentine art schools • formal teaching • group tutorials • Guild system • hot desking • industrial artsindustrial design • industrial practices • John Makepeace • John Ruskinlearning model • learning through making • learning through practicelecture formatlecturers • no-desking • Oxfordshire • Parnham • pedagogical modelpolytechnicremote learning • Rycote Wood • self-learning • studiostudio approachstudio practice • taught classes • technical collegetutorialsUKvocational trainingWilliam Morris • working environment • workspace

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 APRIL 2012

Achim Menges: Architecture and Product Design Research

"Architecture as a material practice is predominately based on an approach to design that is characterised by prioritising the elaboration of form over its subsequent materialisation. Since the Renaissance the increasing division between processes of design and making has led to the age–long development and increasing dependence on representational tools intended for explicit, scalar geometric descriptions that at the same time serve as instructions for the translation from drawing to building. Inevitably, and with few exceptions, even in today's digital practice architects embrace design methods that epitomize the hierarchical separation of form definition and materialisation.

The research of the Institute for Computational Design explores an alternative, morphogenetic approach to design that unfolds morphological complexity and performative capacity from material constituents without differentiating between formation and materialisation processes. This requires an understanding of form, material, structure and environment not as separate aspects, but rather as complex interrelations that are embedded in and explored through integral computational processes.

The notion of material system constitutes one central aspect of this research. Material system does not only refer to the material constituents of a building alone, but rather describes, in a system–theoretical sense, the complex reciprocity between materiality, form, structure and space, the related processes of production and assembly, and the multitude of performative effects that emanate from the interaction with environmental influences and forces. This conceptualization of material systems enables the utilization of computational design processes. The ability of computation to simultaneously do both, stochastically derive and systemically process complex datasets within a defined or evolving constraint space, can be utilized to explore a material system's performative capacity within its materially determined limits. Furthermore, continuously informing the form generation with different modes of computational analysis enables a direct link between the ontogeny, the history of structural changes of an individual, and its interaction with external forces and energy respectively, that is its ecological embedding. This enables to conceive of material systems as the synergetic outcome of calibrating and balancing multiple influencing variables and divergent design criteria, which always already include the interaction with the system–external environment. The resultant environmental modulations can now be understood as highly specific patterns in direct relation to the material interventions from which they originate.

The design of space, structure and climate can be synthesized in one integral design process."

(Achim Menges, Achimmenges.net)

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TAGS

Achim Menges • architectsarchitectural conjecturearchitecture • bifurcation between theory and practice • building • complex datasets • computational design • computational design processes • computational processes • cultural technologydesign and makingdesign methods • design of space • design processdesign researchdigital practice • elaboration of form • environmental influences • environmental modulations • European Renaissanceform • form definition and materialisation • formation and materialisation • hierarchical separation • history of structural change • Institute for Computational Design • latticematerialmaterial interventionsmaterial practice • material systems • materialisationmateriality • materially determined limits • modes of computational analysis • morphogenetic approach to design • morphological complexity • ontogenesis • performative capacity • performative effects • product designproduction and assembly • representational tools • scalar geometric descriptions • space • stochastic • structure • synergetic outcome • synergy • system-theoretical sense • systemically process • theory and practice • translation from drawing to building • wood • wood lattice

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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