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04 JANUARY 2014

Story and Show Bibles: TV series pitching and reference documents

"Writers who want to pitch a TV series create a show bible. The bible contains the concept, location, bios of the characters, full episodes, synopses of potential episodes, and possibly even a pilot episode. Once the TV series is launched, the show bible is used to keep track of details about the setting and characters to preserve continuity. The show bible reminds writers about pertinent but minute facts. No doubt the writers for the TV show Buffy the Vampire Slayer needed to know the characteristics of each demon that Buffy fought as well as the names of her high school classmates who turned out to be vampires. It would be confusing if a student who was supposedly a vampire one season were suddenly able to see her reflection during the next season."

(Rochelle Melander, 2011, p.46)

Melander, R. (2011). "Write–A–Thon: Write Your Book in 26 Days (And Live to Tell About It)", F+W Media.

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2011bible (guide)Buffy the Vampire Slayer • character bible • character bios • character history • consistencycontinuityepisodesfictional universehistories • keep track • living document • living inside a show • main characterpilot episode • pitch document • plotline • preserve continuity • production document • progressive design • reference document • Rochelle Melander • screenwriters • series pitch • show biblesoap opera • story bible • story breakdown • story concept • story location • story outline • story setting • synopsis • television seriesTV series • types of bibles • updated as a series progresses • world of the storywriters

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JANUARY 2014

Alan Becker's Animator vs Animation series

"Animator vs. Animation plays with the idea that the little stick figures that you animate can fight back and do damage to your computer. Since the world of computers is so vast, the possibility for gags is endless. I've had the stick figure engage in matrix style fighting with all the icons on the desktop, a one–on–one duel with Clippy (the old Microsoft Word Assistant), a solitaire fight with another stick figure using cards, the list goes on."

(Alan Becker)

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Adobe Flash • Alan Becker • animated episodesanimationanimator as creator • Animator vs Animation • chase scene • Clippy (Microsoft Word Assistant) • duelepisodesfightfight backfight sequenceFlash animation • Microsoft Word Assistant • mise-en-abymemultiple media chase scenenaively drawn figuresone-on-oneparodyremediationsilly web video • solitaire • stick figurestick man • story within a story • The Matrix (1999)web graphicsweb vernacularwebisode

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2013

The Open Road: an early travelogue in colour

"In 1924 Claude Friese–Greene (cinematographer and son of moving–image pioneer William) embarked on an intrepid road trip from Land's End to John O'Groats. He recorded his journey on film, using an experimental colour process. Entitled The Open Road, this remarkable travelogue was conceived as a series of 26 short episodes, to be shown weekly at the cinema."

(Independent Cinema Office, UK)

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1920s1926BFI National Archive • British pioneer • cinemacinema pioneer • cinema technician • Claude Friese-Greene • colourcolour film • colour footage • colour processcultural heritageepisodes • experimental colour process • footage • Friese-Greene Natural Colour • history of cinema • Independent Cinema Office • John OGroats • Jonquil • journey • Lands End • Londonnatural colour • picture-postcard • road journey • road trip • social history • The Open Road (1926) • travelogueUK • William Friese-Greene • Yann Tiersen

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 APRIL 2012

LycetteBros: revisting Not My Type

"The Not My Type animation series was primarily produced for distribution on the internet. Set in an office, the Not My Type series explores the various relationships within. While avoiding the use of language and dialogue, Not My Type, takes various typographic faces, symbols and characters and then duplicates, distorts and moves them to create a simple, stylistic production.

The initial version was created using Macromedia Director in 1995 (while John was at University) and was then recreated in 2000 for internet distribution using Flash – which was a perfect fit for a font based, primarily black & white animation. Not My Type I was so well received that another episode soon followed, culminating in four episodes by the end of 2002."

(John and Mark Lycette)

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1995200020022D animationAdobe Flashanimated episodesanimationanimation seriesAustraliablack and white • distribution on the internet • episodesexpressive typographyfonts • internet distribution • John LycetteLycette BrosMacromedia DirectorMark LycettemuteNot My Typeoffice settingshort film • stylistic production • typetypeface personalitiestypographic characterstypographic faces • typographic symbols • typography

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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