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Which clippings match 'Newspaper' keyword pg.1 of 4
17 FEBRUARY 2013

Let's not let new technology change our profession or our industry...

"This newscast from KRON in San Francisco in 1981 has been making the rounds recently. It's labeled 'primitive Internet report,' but what it presents is actually one example of the many pre–Internet efforts that the newspaper industry made to try to plan for an online future – and stake out its own turf in that forthcoming world. ...

In the video, you can hear [Dave] Cole say, of the 'Electronic Examiner' he was demonstrating, 'We're not in it to make money.' At the end, the announcer points out that an entire edition of the paper takes two hours to download, at a $5/hour cost – making this 'telepaper' little competition for the paper edition. 'For the moment at least,' the reporter declares, over the image of a sidewalk news vendor hawking the afternoon edition, 'this fellow isn't worried about being out of a job.'

Though the piece does say that 'Engineers now predict the day will come when we get all our newspapers and magazines by home computer,' its underlying message is – Don't worry. This crazy computer stuff isn't going to change anything much for now. And indeed it took 10 years for any sort of online service to become even remotely popular. Almost 30 years later, newspapers are still in business; some are even still sold by guys on sidewalks. It has taken this long for the technology to transform the newspaper biz in a big way. ...

But even as the downloads sped up and the connect–time costs dropped, the industry held onto that approach, instead of coming to grips with the fundamentally different dynamics of a new communications medium. What had made sense in the early days over time became a crippling set of blinders. The spirit of experimentation that the Examiner set out with in 1981 dried up, replaced by an industry–wide allergy to fundamental change.

'Let's use the new technology,' editors and executives would say, 'but let's not let the technology change our profession or our industry.' They largely succeeded in resisting change. Now it's catching up with them."

(Scott Rosenberg, 29 January 2009)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2013

The Tablet Newspaper: A Vision for the Future in 1994

"The Knight Ridder Information Design Lab is developing a newspaper interface for the tablet device. The tablet newspaper draws on the strengths of print and on the strengths of electronic forms. It is both browsable and searchable, both broad–reaching and customizable. It offers pages with story abstracts linked to more detailed stories, background material, photos, sound, and video. People can ran read as deeply or as casually as they want. Stories are no longer limited to 'news hole,' the space allotted to editorial content after press configurations and advertising have been considered.

The tablet newspaper includes editorial content and advertising, both important components of a local information package. Like editorial content, advertising can have many layers, and can be searched and sorted, as well as browsed. Additionally, ads can have transaction hooks, so that readers can make reservations or purchases."

(Teresa Martin, 1995, CHI Conference Proceedings [http://www.sigchi.org/chi95/])

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TAGS

1994ACM • Apple Newton • Association for Computing Machinery • browsable • digital eradigital media • digital paper • digital readingdigital technologyelectronic formselectronic newspaperelectronic publishingfuture of the book • information interface • ink-on-paper • interface design • Knight-Ridder Information Design Lab • layout designlook and feelnew technologiesnewspaperpage layoutPDApersonal computerpersonal digital assistantremediation • Roger Fidler • speculative researchtablettablet interface • tablet newspaper • tablet publishingtechnology convergencetechnology innovation • textual information • the future of the book • vertical orientation • visual clues

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 FEBRUARY 2013

How will the future objects and methods of graphic design and the industries it serves be reconfigured?

Thursday 07 and Friday 08 March 2013, Open, 20 Bank Plain, Norwich, Norfolk, NR2 4SF

"A two day symposium organised by Norwich University of the Arts that will explore the relationship between print and digital, and the coexistence of media in a wider sense; how they combine, and how they provide unique opportunities.

As the design industry embraces dramatic changes in technology, the Cowbird Symposium will look at graphic design as an output, a practice and a profession, exploring the relationships between print and screen–based communication. Guest speakers, all leading thinkers and practitioners themselves, will be invited to comment on the future of the distributed text–the book, magazine, newspaper and poster, as well as the challenge and opportunity afforded by new technologies, tablets, e–readers, smart phones, augmented reality, social media, digital displays, and new practices, crowdsourcing, coding, data sharing, and social reading."

(Norwich University of the Arts)

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TAGS

2013augmented realitybook formcoding • coexistence of media • Cowbird Symposium • crowdsourcingdata sharingdesign for printdesign industrydigital displaysdiscourse and practice • distributed text • e-readergraphic designgraphic design discoursegraphic design practice • graphic design profession • magazine form • new practicesnew technologiesnewspaper • Norwich University of the Arts • objects and methods • poster designprint and digital • screen-based communication • smart phonesocial mediasocial readingsymposiumtabletstechnological changethe future of digital content • the future of graphic design • the future of the bookUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JANUARY 2013

Citizen Kane: famous film transition from a photograph to real life

"Another transition takes us to the same three men, this time reflected in the window of the Chronicle, Kane's major rival (Circulation 495,000). 'I know you're tired, Gentlemen... Kane begins, suggesting the men have come straight from the offices of the Inquirer after spending all night getting the paper out. The scene not only illustrates Kane's tireless ambition, but provides a seamless transition from the humble beginnings of the Inquirer to the day, six years later, when Kane has managed to poach the entire reporting staff captured in a photograph prominently positioned in the window of the Chronicle on that first night. The camera slowly dollies in on the reporters as Bernstein tells Kane it took the Chronicle twenty years to gather such a highly respected staff. 'Twenty years?' says Kane, 'Wells' – and suddenly, as the sentence Kane speaks spans six years, the reporters are no longer still images in a photograph but moving, breathing people – 'six years ago I looked at a picture of the world's greatest newspapermen. I felt like a kid in front of a candy store.' Kane himself then enters from the left, looking prosperous and confident..."

(Movie Movie)

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TAGS

1941 • captured in a photograph • Charles Foster Kane • Citizen Kanecoming to life • Everett Sloane • film transition • group photograph • humble beginnings • Joseph Cotten • living photonewspaper • newspaper circulation • newspaper tycoon • newspapermen • Orson Wellesphotograph • poach • reflected in the window • reporters • reporting staff • respected staff • scene transition • screen-mediated virtual space • seamless transition • sequence transitionshop windowtableau • The Chronicle • The Inquirer • transition

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JULY 2012

Fahrenheit 451: illustrations replace text in newspapers

Montag (Oskar Werner) 'reads' his illustrated newspaper in bed. The scene is from François Truffaut's classic film treatment of Ray Bradbury's 1953 novel about a dystopian world where written books have been outlawed.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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