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Which clippings match 'Technological Context' keyword pg.1 of 1
30 SEPTEMBER 2013

Technology is not neutral, it embodies values...

"What all of this means is that technology is not neutral. It embodies values, both in how it is constructed and in the decision to deploy it. As such, it refers to its history of use and the practices that surround it. The observation that 'the computer is just a tool' is missing the point. It is a tool with a point of view and with the ability to change user behavior and our expectations of information. Additionally, as technology becomes more immersive–exists more as a convincing simulation of some reality it is no longer a tool or a medium in the same sense as pen and ink. It represents its own world, one with implicit and explicit rules, communities of practice, and transformative power over what and how things mean. The technological responsibility of the graphic designer is therefore not simply to master software programs, but to understand the technological context as enabling or constraining cognitive and social behaviors that have a direct impact on the success of communication."

(Meredith Davis, p.92)

Davis, M. (2012). "Graphic Design Theory", Thames & Hudson.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2012

Towards a Performative Aesthetics of Interactivity

"I identify a two–decade period – roughly speaking 1985–2005 – as the pioneering experimental period of (computer based) interactive art. Crucial to the understanding of work in this period is the blindingly rapid development of the technological context. At the beginning of the period the graphical user interface was a novelty, the internet barely existed, the web was a decade away, interactivity was an intriguing concept. The production of acceptably high resolution illusionistic digital pictures (still frames) was an active research area and a megabyte of RAM was something luxurious.

The period neatly brackets the emergence of most of the major technological milestones which now undergird digital culture and ubiquitous computing: WYSIWYG, digital multimedia, hypermedia, virtual reality, the internet, the world wide web, digital video, real–time graphics, digital 3D, mobile telephony, GPS, Bluetooth and other mobile and wireless communication systems. It was a period of rapid technological change, euphoria and hype."

(Simon Penny, 2011)

Simon Penny (2011). "Towards a Performative Aesthetics of Interactivity", Fibreculture Journal, issue 19 2011: Ubiquity.

Fig.1 Sniff and Performative Ecologies were included in Emergence, a show of Artificial Life Art curated by Simon Penny and David Familian at the Beall Center for Art and Technology, University of California Irvine, December 2009–April 2010. Regrettably Performative Ecologies did not function as designed during the exhibition.

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TAGS

19852005academic journal • artificial life art • bluetoothcomputer based interactive artconvergencecross-disciplinarydesign historydesign researcherdigital 3Ddigital culturedigital multimediadigital videofibrecultureFibreculture JournalGPSgraphical user interfacehistory • honeymoon period • hypermedia • illusionistic digital pictures • interactive artinteractivityInternetmedia art • megabyte • mobile and wireless communication systems • mobile telephony • multimedianew medianovelty • performative ecologies • pioneering experimental period • RAM • rapid development • rapid technological changereal-time graphics • Simon Penny • speculative designtechnological changetechnological context • technological milestones • timelineubiquitous computingverisimilitudevirtual realityvisualisationweb designworld wide webWYSIWYG

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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