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Which clippings match 'Authority' keyword pg.1 of 2
30 NOVEMBER 2013

Confiscation Cabinets: an exhibition of confiscated childhood objects

"Artist Guy Tarrant's display cabinets show artefacts gleaned from 150 different London primary and secondary schools over three decades. These objects include homemade games, keepsakes, cult toys, peculiar adornments, weapons and other forbidden objects which characterise the flotsam and jetsam of contemporary school children.

Since qualifying as a teacher, Guy Tarrant has investigated pupil interaction, play and resistant behaviour. The objects in the cabinets highlight mischievous and distracted behaviour played out in the controlled school setting where children spend much of their time. These confiscated items are evidence of the pupils' playful and impulsive activities and how they may reject or evade rules."

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ad-hoc • adornments • artefactsauthoritychildhood imagination • confiscated items • Confiscation Cabinets • confiscation drawer • controlcontrolled environments • cult toys • cultural significance of objectsdiscipline and punishmentdistracting attentiondistracting behaviourDIYfad • flotsam and jetsam • forbidden objects • Guy Tarrant • homemade bombs • homemade gamesimprovisation • impulsive activities • intriguing objects • keepsake • makeshiftmaterial culturemischievous behaviour • Museum of Childhood • personal cultural production • personal objects • plastic toysplayful activitiesprimary schoolpunishmentregulationresistant behaviourrulesschool children • school setting • secondary schoolsocial interactionsubversive actionssymbolic controltoy • toy guns • V and Aweapons

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JUNE 2013

The Stanford Prison Experiment

"Welcome to the Stanford Prison Experiment web site, which features an extensive slide show and information about this classic psychology experiment, including parallels with the abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib. What happens when you put good people in an evil place? Does humanity win over evil, or does evil triumph? These are some of the questions we posed in this dramatic simulation of prison life conducted in the summer of 1971 at Stanford University.

How we went about testing these questions and what we found may astound you. Our planned two–week investigation into the psychology of prison life had to be ended prematurely after only six days because of what the situation was doing to the college students who participated. In only a few days, our guards became sadistic and our prisoners became depressed and showed signs of extreme stress. Please join me on a slide tour describing this experiment and uncovering what it tells us about the nature of human nature."

(Philip G. Zimbardo)

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1971Abu Ghraib Prisonauthoritybrutalitycommand responsibility • Cool Hand Luke (1967) • dehumanisationdeindividuationdignitydisciplineethics • guard • guilthuman experimentationhuman naturehuman subjectshuman willhumiliationimprisonmentmoral dignitymoral dilemmamoralitynature of morality • Philip Zimbardo • powerpower corruptsprisonprisonerpsychology • research experiment • research study • self-controlsimulation studysocial experimentssocial responsibility • Stanford Prison Experiment • suffering injustice

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JANUARY 2013

A theory about the power of persuasive communication

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animated presentationauthority • concorde • consensusconsistency • gift-exchange • human naturelegitimating criterialevels of meaninglikedlikes • liking • marketing communicationpatterns of activationpersuasionpersuasive communicationpersuasively suggestivepsychological perceptionreciprocity • Robert Cialdini • scarcity • science of persuasion • scientifically proven • social obligation • Steve Martin • trust and reputationuniversal principles

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 AUGUST 2012

Kevin Kelly: screen culture is a world of constant flux

"Screen culture is a world of constant flux, of endless sound bites, quick cuts and half–baked ideas. It is a flow of gossip tidbits, news headlines and floating first impressions. Notions don't stand alone but are massively interlinked to everything else; truth is not delivered by authors and authorities but is assembled by the audience. Screen culture is fast, like a 30–sec. movie trailer, and as liquid and open–ended as a website. ...

On a screen, words move, meld into pictures, change color and perhaps even meaning. Sometimes there are no words at all, only pictures or diagrams or glyphs that may be deciphered into multiple meanings. This is terribly unnerving to any civilization based on text logic."

(Kevin Kelly, 19 June 2000, "Will We Still Turn Pages", Time Magazine)

Fig.1 JasKaitlin "hypermediacy" taken on April 25, 2010 using an Apple iPhone 3GS [http://www.flickr.com/photos/64776338@N07/5996281055/].

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200021st centuryaudienceauthorised voiceauthorityauthorshipbook • classic logic of books • cohesive narratives • constant flux • credibility • cultural change • double screening • dual screening • endlessly tweakable • fast action • first impressions • flowfragmentaryfragmentation • framing narrative • gossiphalf-baked ideashypermediacyinformation in contextinterconnectedness • interlinked • Kevin Kellyliquid • meanings change • multi-tabbing • multiple meanings • narrative framingnon-linearopen-ended • people of the book • people of the screen • quick cutsreflexive modernityscreen culturesensemakingsound bitesynthesise knowledge • text logic • tidbitsTime Magazine • traditional narratives • turning pages • various contexts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2012

Open journalism: the newspaper is moving beyond a newspaper

"If the story of the Three Little Pigs broke today, how would a modern newspaper cover it? That's the concept behind a new TV ad for The Guardian, the newspaper's first major TV spot for 25 years.

The spot launches a campaign to promote the paper's 'open journalism' approach–its name for the way in which it is attempting to involve its readership in not just commenting on stories, but contributing to and even determining its news agenda. 'Open is our operating system, a way of doing things that is based on a belief in the open exchange of information, ideas and opinions and its power to bring about change,' said Alan Rusbridger, editor–in–chief of Guardian and MediaGuardian publisher Guardian News & Media. 'The campaign is designed to bring that philosophy to life for new and existing readers.'

The launch ad examines the way in which the tale of the Three Little Pigs might be covered by The Guardian today, with all the different forms of content and different channels that implies. It also seeks to get over the way in which stories develop over time as new facts come to light and the effect of social media on switching the focus of coverage and debate.

An epic two–minute version (shown above) debuted on Channel 4 last night.

Comparisons will inevitably be made with 1986's classic Points of View by BMP (indeed the Guardian itself has said that the new ad is a 'nod' to the old one. They share an endline: The Whole Picture).

But while Points of View got over its message succintly and elegantly, Three Little Pigs is less focussed, less pithy. This can be seen as a reflection of the changing nature of media–newspapers are now less about relating THE story and more about acting as a platform for multiple strands around a topic to be explored by multiple participants, including the readers themselves, in real time. But it makes for a less memorable piece of advertising storytelling.

'The aim is to reach progressive audiences and show them why they should spend time with us,' according to Andrew Miller, chief executive of the Guardian's parent company Guardian Media Group. But you have to wonder whether such progressive types would not be aware of what the Guardian is doing anyway? The ad will probably make existing Guardian readers feel better about themselves, but will its slightly daunting complexity attract many new ones?"

(Patrick Burgoyne, 1 March 2012, Creative Review)

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adadvertisersauthorityauthorship • Bartle Bogle Hegarty • BBH (advertising agency) • bloggingcitizen journalismcoverageCreative Review (magazine)debate • depth of coverage • digital firstdigital publishingend of printjournalismmediamedia convergencemedia landscapemedia paradigm shift • news editor • newspaperold media • open journalism • open software • printprint mediaprint publishingpublishingpublishing model • range of coverage • readershipThe GuardianThe Whole Picture • Three Little Pigs • traditiontransformationtruth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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