Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Mutant Science' keyword pg.1 of 2
17 MARCH 2016

Milos Rajkovic: Skinner Box Head

"Rajkovic creates animated portraits of anonymous archetypes with deconstructed heads and symbolic components that operate like finely tuned machines. Everything is fair game: a religious figure with alter, candles, and a rotating luxury car; U.S. military figures with weight-lifting Ronald McDonald, skeletons, praying hands, and a flat screen TV playing 24-hour cable news.

The brains of these figures are compromised–sometimes portrayed as dropping into a pool of blood or being picked at by a vulture-like bald eagle–so comprised possibly that they are missing the capacity for human empathy. Are they all portraits of psychopaths perhaps? I'm guessing that Milos' answer might be affirmative—these are the psychopaths who run your government, military, religious and corporate institutions."

(Chris McDonnell, 31 December 2013, Cartoon Brew)

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2013 • animal behaviour • animated portrait • birdbizarre imagerybizarre machines • Burrhus Frederic Skinner • Cartoon Brew • deconstructed heads • facefantastical worlds • finely tuned machines • grotesquehuman head • Milos Rajkovic • miniature machines • mutant science • operant conditioning chamber • physiology • Serbian artist • Skinner box • speculative biology • surreal imaginings

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 FEBRUARY 2016

After Accelerationism: The Xenofeminist Manifesto

"Xenofeminism is gender-abolitionist...Let a hundred sexes bloom! ...[And, let's] construct a society where traits currently assembled under the rubric of gender, no longer furnish a grid for the asymmetric operation of power… You're not exploited or oppressed because you are a wage labourer or poor; you are a labourer or poor because you are exploited..."

(The Laboria Cuboniks collective, 11 June 2015, &&& Journal)

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2015 • accelerationism • alien future • alienationalternative visions • aporias of difference • artificial wombs • becomingbody politicsbrave new world • class exclusion • counterculturecritical reinterpretationcyberfeminismdehumanisationdystopian futureearly 21st century • emancipatory potential of technology • exclusionfeminism • foundationalism • freedom from • freedom to • futuristic visiongender politics • gender-abolitionist • groundless universalism • human sexual experience • identity politicsImmanuel Kant • Laboria Cuboniks (collective) • liminalitymanifestomathematical abstractionmeaning-contextsmediated representationmutant sciencenetwork society • Nicolas Bourbaki • nodes of collective agreement • objective realityporous boundaries • prometheanism • protean ambition • race exclusion • radical recomposition • rationalityreterritorialisationselfhood • sexes • state of alienation • synthetic hormones • techno-utopiatechnoculture • technological alienation • transect • transfeminist perspective • transfeminist political project • transgender • transits • transmodernity • transtemporal • visions of the future • xenofeminism • xenofeminist • xenofeminist manifesto • XFM

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JANUARY 2015

The Codex Seraphinianus by Luigi Serafini

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1981alien beings • alien writing system • anatomies • art book • bipedal creatures • bizarre games • bizarre imagerybizarre machines • bizarre vehicles • burial customs • Codex Seraphinianus (1981) • colour illustrations • delicate appearance • dining practicesdivergent conceptsencyclopaedia • fantaencyclopedia • fantastical science • fantastical worlds • funereal customs • futuristic machines • hallucinogenic • hand-drawn illustrationillustrated book • illustrated encyclopaedia • imaginary landscapesimaginary worlds • Italian artist • ludic intervention • Luigi Serafini • mutant scienceorganism • pencil illustrations • plant life • psychedelic imagery • senseless machines • speculative architecturespeculative biology • speculative chemistry • speculative physics • strange flowers • surreal landscape • surrealist illustration • weird book • writing system

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2012

Loom: Blade Runner style 4K short film by Luke Scott

"He is an acclaimed commercial director who has pushed through his work to step out of the shadow of his father, Ridley Scott. And now Luke Scott is transcending boundaries in video technology with a visually–arresting 20–minute short film, Loom. Shot in coordination with RED Camera, the sci–fi short features Giovanni Ribisi and Jellybean Howie, although cinematographer Dariusz Wolski just might be its star.

The film follows Ribisi's character Tommy – a lab tech who genetically modifies meat and begins a dangerous at–home experiment he struggles to perfect. It ends with a monologue taken from the conclusion of Darwin's Origin of Species, leaving many of the story's questions left unanswered. 'There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved,' says Howie's character.

Visually, Scott – who directs for his father's production company RSA – gives nod to the filmmaker's 1982 classic Blade Runner, shooting the piece in the tone and style of the dystopian thriller. Constructed for 3D, the piece was crafted to test the limits of the colour range and exposure, allowing viewers to see fine details often lost in dark scenes.

RED initially presented Loom at the 2012 National Association of Broadcasters [NAB] Show this past April. The company has since continued to screen the film, and on Wednesday President Jarred Land released it online via REDUSER, with a disclaimer for cinephiles."

(Jennifer Madison, 31 August 2012, Mail Online)

Fig. 1 published on 28 Aug 2012 by ENTV, YouTube

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20124K • 4K 3D • 4K projection • bio-ethicsbiotechnologyBlade Runner (1982)Charles Darwincinematographycolour • colour range • commercials director • cultured meat • Dariusz Wolski • diseasedystopian future • dystopian thriller • Epic RED • film exposure • fine detail • genetic manipulation • genetically modified meat • genetics • Giovanni Ribisi • HDin vitro meat • Jellybean Howie • lab tech • laser projector • loom • Loom (film) • Los Angeles Short Fest • Luke Scott • mutant science • NAB (acronym) • National Association of Broadcasters • Origin of Species • RED Camera • RED ONE • REDUSER • Ridley Scott • RSA (production company) • sci-fisci-fi short filmscience-fiction • shmeat • short filmvideo technologyvisual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 APRIL 2012

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein: the first true science fiction novel

"What many might consider to be true science fiction began to emerge during the Enlightenment in the early 16th Century as the Western world's understanding of science blossomed. Others identify Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, published in 1818 as the Industrial Revolution gathered pace, as the first true science fiction novel. Today it tends to be seen very much as gothic horror, but it relies heavily on extrapolating then current scientific understanding to extreme fantastical ends."

(Lynne Hardy, 1 August 2011, Celebrating Science)

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16th century1818bio-ethics • Durham University • European Enlightenmentfantastical endsFrankenstein • gothic horror • human beingsindustrial revolutionMary Shelleymodernitymutant sciencenovelPenguin Random Houseposthumansciencescience fiction • science fiction novel • science-fictionscientific discoveries • scientific innovation • scientific theories • scientific understandingspeculative fiction • understanding science

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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