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Which clippings match 'Authoring' keyword pg.1 of 1
15 OCTOBER 2012

Booktype: open source self-publishing platform

"Booktype is a free, open source platform that produces beautiful, engaging books formatted for print, Amazon, iBooks and almost any ereader within minutes. Create books on your own or with others via an easy–to–use web interface. Build a community around your content with social tools and use the reach of mobile, tablet and ebook technology to engage new audiences."

(Adam Hyde, 2012)

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TAGS

.mobi2012Adam Hyde • airtime • Amazon.comauthoringbook • book community • book publishing • Booki software • Booktype • build a community • CMSconvergencedigital booksdigital publishingdigital readingeBookend of printepubFLOSSfuture of the bookgo digital • iBooks • new audiences • Newscoop • ODT • open sourceopen source platformPDFprint on demand • publish your content • publishingpublishing books • publishing for ebook • publishing for mobile • publishing for tablet • self-publishing • social tools • Sourcefabric • superdesk • tablet publishingtechnology convergencethe future of the bookwritten word

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MARCH 2011

Prezi: a tool that allows you to animate your presentation narrative

"Prezi lets you bring your ideas into one space and see how they relate, helping you and your audience connect. Zoom out to see the big picture and zoom in to see details – a bit like web–based maps that have changed how we navigate through map books."

(Prezi Inc., 2011)

[The tool provides a useful way of creating a 'presentation narrative'. In so doing it shifts the emphasis away from the 'content' of your presentation towards the sequential arrangement of ideas and their interrelationships.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 SEPTEMBER 2010

Pixlr: web-based photo editor

"Pixlr is the creator of online cloud–based image tools. Today we have two applications in our suite, one we call Pixlr Editor and the other is Pixlr Express. They are built in Flash and you need to have a Flash plug in to get it to work."

(Pixlr.com)

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TAGS

Adobe Flashapplicationauthoringcloud computing • cloud-based • convergenceeditingeditorFirefoxfreeICT • image editing • innovationInternet • Internet-based computing • multi-language • multi-language support • online • online photo editor • photo editing • photo editor • Photoshop • Pixlr • Pixlr document format • Pixlr Editor • Pixlr Express • Pixlr Grabber • productivity tools • PXD • softwaresolutiontechnologytoolusabilityweb application

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 AUGUST 2009

Google Docs: the networked computer classroom?

"The networked computer classroom has always held out the promise of improved collaboration and peer review of documents. The foundational work in this area was based on social constructionist theory ( e.g., Barker & Kemp 1990; Cooper & Selfe 1990; Hawisher & Selfe 1991): scholars saw networked writing as a concrete application of social constructionism, which emphasized collaborative writing, and consequently produced collaborative tools (such as the Daedalus Interactive Writing Environment and the enCore MOO). More recently, content management systems and wikis have joined the list of ways to collaborate. All allow participants to review, co–edit, and comment on a single text in a single space.

However, these technologies have tended to fill relatively narrow niches, due in part to the learning curve for using them (most people don't want to learn special markup) and the need for specialized hardware and software to run them (most people don't have dedicated servers to run a CMS). Not surprisingly, most documents –– in university settings and in business collaborations –– are still created in Microsoft Word or another word processor, and emailed from collaborator to collaborator (a practice known as "ping–ponging"). This solution is a variation of the timeworn solution of handing drafts from person to person. And it has the same drawback: it's impossible for multiple people to work simultaneously on the same draft without versioning problems. Nevertheless, people limp along with this solution because it has a shallow learning curve and leverages existing services.
...
In August 2006, Google launched Google Apps for Your Domain, a suite of tools that includes email, calendar, and website design software (Google Mail, Calendar, and Page Creator), and is aggressively marketing the suite to the education market and small businesses. In essence, these organizations can outsource a chunk of their information technology to Google, and Google brands these services for each organization. This service is particularly valuable to the education and small business markets since these relatively small organizations frequently devote considerable IT resources to electronic collaboration and publication, and they have trouble holding on to people with deep IT expertise.
...
Eventually the product relaunched as Google Docs, integrated with Google's spreadsheet offering
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Google Docs Features The headline news about Google Docs is that the application supports easy parallel collaboration. Once you've logged in, you see a list of the most recent documents (word processor files and spreadsheets) and the collaborators who have been working on them. You can choose to share your own documents with collaborators at a variety of permissions levels –– and they can similarly choose to share theirs with you. "
(Clay Spinuzzi, University of Texas at Austin)

Barker, T. and Kemp, F. (1990). Network theory: A postmodern pedagogy for the writing classroom. In Handa, C., editor, Computers and Community: Teaching Composition in the Twenty–First Century, pages 1–27. Boynton/Cook Publishers, New York.

Cooper, M. and Selfe, C. L. (1990). Computer conferences and learning: Authority, resistance, and internally persuasive discourse. College English, 52:847–869.

Hawisher, G. E. and Selfe, C. L. (1991). The rhetoric of technology and the electronic writing class. College Composition and Communication, 42:55–65.

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TAGS

authoringauthorshipclassroomCMScollaboration • collaborative writing • Daedalus Interactive Writing Environment • DIWEeducation • electronic literacy • enCore MOO • Google AppsGoogle DocsGoogle Inc • Google Spreadsheets • interactionlearningMicrosoft WordMOOpaedagogyparticipatory learningpedagogypeer review • ping-ponging • scriptible • versioning • wikiWritely (Upstartle)writing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JUNE 2005

Streaming Media: Turning Major Technologies Into Minor Machines

Geert Lovink (Draft, June 4, 2002)
Streaming media have the technical possibility to question the iron necessity of the return of the 'one to many' broadcasting models. Interactivity has the possibility to fragment the 'mass' audiences into a dispersed group of users. The technical peer–to–peer approach (as opposed to the client–server model) may be obvious for some but its consequences are far reaching. In contrast to broadcasting we may define streaming media as channels that make audio and visual material available on the Internet. ... Alternative streaming ... stresses the importance of networked webcasting and, most notably, does not retransmit existing radio signals. They provide the Net with new, yet unknown content and forms of subjectivity. Becoming minor, in this context can be described as a strategy of "turning major technologies into minor machines." Against the mass media a heterogeneous network of networks could flourish. The listener as producer submerges into an immersive space, designer a unique, personal mix of up and downstream data.

TAGS

authoring • becoming minor • heterogeneous network • Lovink • machineP2P • P2P computing • P2P network • P2P networking • peer-to-peer (P2P) • streamingstreaming media
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