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Which clippings match 'Netherlands' keyword pg.1 of 6
22 NOVEMBER 2016

Wander through a Garden of Earthly Delights on loop

'Paradise' was commissioned by the MOTI Museum in The Netherlands for the exhibition New Delights, which is part of the Hieronymus Bosch 500-year anniversary. A gigantic video installation of this work is exhibited in the Museum until the 31st of December 2016.

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1490 • 20163D animation4K • 500 year anniversary • animated experience • animated interpretation • animated paintinganniversarycarnivalesquechickencoming to lifeconsumerismcontemporary interpretationcontinuous scenecreaturesdecadence • digitally recreated • Dutch animation • Dutch art • Dutch master • eroticismescapism • famous painting • hallucinatoryHello KittyHieronymus Boschlandscapelarge scale installationliving paintingliving picturesmedieval art • medieval painting • metaphors for our society • MOTI Museum • Netherlandspaintingpanoramic portrayalpenisselfishness • spybot • Studio Smack • synthetic fresco • The Garden of Earthly Delights • triptychvanityvideo installationvideo mural

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JULY 2016

My 93-year-old Flatmate: a Dutch retirement home experiment

"My 93-year-old Flatmate", by Aaron Lewis, Meggie Palmer, Bernadine Lim; Airdate: Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 21:30; Channel: SBS.

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Aaron Lewis • ageing population • Bernadine Lim • care home • Deventer • drinking games • Dutch retirement home • elderly • flatmate • Gea Sijpkes • health and social carehealthcareHolland • Humanitas aged care home • intergenerational living • jigsaw • live rent free • live side-by-side • living side-by-side • living together • Meggie Palmer • Netherlandsprogressive societyretirement community • retirement home • sadness of death • SBS Dateline • sex talk • sharing the joys of life • young and old

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JUNE 2015

Compelling motion infographics: The Fallen of World War II

"The Fallen of World War II is an interactive documentary that examines the human cost of the second World War and the decline in battle deaths in the years since the war. The 15-minute data visualization uses cinematic storytelling techniques to provide viewers with a fresh and dramatic perspective of a pivotal moment in history."

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23 • 80 • Africa • AlteredQualiea • Andy Dollerson • Aotearoa New Zealand • Auschwitz-Birkenau • AustraliaAustriaaverage age • battle deaths • Belgium • Belzec • British colonial era • BurmaCanadacasualties • Chelmno • civilian deaths • concentration camp • cost of war • counting the numbers • course of historyD-Day landingdata visualisation • data-driven documentary • death campDenmark • Eastern Front • Estonia • firebombing • Francefutility of wargas chambergassingGreecehistorical perspective • human cost of war • HungaryIndiaIndonesiainfo graphicsinteractive information designItalyJapanJewish HolocaustKoreaLatviaLithuania • long peace • Luxembourg • Majdanek • military conflictMyanmarNazi Germany • Neil Halloran • Netherlands • North American historical perspective • Norwaynumerical scalesOkinawa • Omaha Beach • Pacific Rim • Pacific War • peace • Pearl Harbor • Peoples Republic of ChinaPeoples Republic of PolandPhilippinespicture statisticsPolandRomania • Siege of Leningrad • Slovakia • Sobibor • Soviet armySoviet Russia • Stalingrad • statistical graphics • Steven Pinker • Treblinka • UKvisual information designwarwar crimes • Western Front • World War II • Yellow River • Yugoslavia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2015

Joep Frens: To Make is to Grasp

"Joep Frens, Designer/Researcher and Assistant Professor in the 'Designing Quality in Interaction' group at Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands. Joep's work explores how to design for (growing) systems and the power of 'making' as a physical way of thinking. He takes a 'hands-on' approach to design based in the research-through-design method and regularly gives workshops on cardboard modeling.

Joep is a designer/researcher from the Netherlands. He holds a master degree in Industrial Design Engineering from Delft University of Technology and a doctoral degree from Eindhoven University of Technology on a thesis called: 'Designing for Rich Interaction: Integrating Form, Interaction, and Function' (2006). Currently he is assistant professor in the 'Designing Quality in Interaction' group at the same university. He teaches several courses at bachelor and master level and supervises several PhD students.

In his teaching and research Joep tries to bring together two of his fascinations: the question of how to design for (growing) systems and the power of making as a physical way of thinking. He takes a hands-on approach and is well versed in the research-through-design method. He regularly gives workshops on cardboard modeling and runs a website around the technique.

Before his doctoral research he spent a year at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (ETH), and after he has been invited to teach and lecture in the USA (CMU), Germany (HFGSG, FHD), South-Korea (KAIST), China (Tsinghua University, Jiangnan university), Belgium (UA) and at several universities in the Netherlands.

Joep's lecture occurred Wednesday, October 1st at 5:00pm in MMCH A14."

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2014 • action based paradigm • aesthetic experience • aesthetic interaction • camera • cardboard modelling • Carnegie Mellon Universitycognitive skillsconcept camera • David Menting • Delft University of Technologydesign conceptDesign the Future Lecture Programme • designing for growing systems • designing for interaction • designing for rich interaction • designing for systems • ecological psychology • Eindhoven University of Technology • embodied interaction • expressivity • expressivity of form • feel thingsform and function • form and use • future interfaces • grasp • handlehaptic interfaceHCIhuman capabilitiesindustrial designinteraction styles • Joep Elderman • Joep Frens • Jordy Rooijakkers • Josje Wijnen • Kacper Holenderski • Ken Giang • Lukas Van Campenhout • making as a physical way of thinking • making processmodular design • multi-specific products • Netherlands • Nierenberg Chair of Design • on-screen menus • our tools talk to usphysical modelsphysical objectspliability • proceduralisation • product design • research-through-design method • rich interaction • standardisation interaction styles • systemic design • tactile richnesstechnology affordances • Tom Frissen

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 NOVEMBER 2014

Hogeweyk: Dutch village designed just for people with dementia

"In the small town of Weesp, in Holland – that bastion of social progressivism – at a dementia–focused living center called De Hogeweyk, aka Dementia Village, the relationship between patients and their care is serving as a model for the rest of the world. ... The idea, explains Hogeweyk's creators, is to design a world that maintains as much a resemblance to normal life as possible – without endangering the patients. For example, one common symptom is the urge to roam, often without warning, which had led most 'memory units' and dementia care centres to institute a strict lock–down policy. In one German town, an Alzheimer's care center event set up a fake bus stop to foil wandering residents. At Hogeweyk, the interior of the security perimeter is its own little village – which means that patients can move about as they wish without being in danger.

Each apartment hosts six to eight people, including caretakers – who wear street clothes – and the relationship between the two is unique. Residents help with everything from cooking to cleaning. They can buy whatever they want from the grocery. They can get their hair done or go to a restaurant. It's those basic routines and rituals that can help residents maintain a better quality of living. ...

People with dementia often struggle with unfamiliar spaces, colours, and even decor. At Hogeweyk, apartments are designed to reach familiar cultural touchstones, categorized into six basic 'genres' of design: 'goois' or upperclass (the decor looks old fashioned), homey, Christian, artisan, Indonesian, and cultural. Each apartment is different, catered to a particular lifestyle, right down to the silverware and furniture. 'Living in lifestyles,' explains Hogeweyk, 'just like before.'

Molenaar&Bol&VanDillen, but it was the brainchild of Yvonne van Amerongen, a caregiver who has worked with memory patients for decades. Starting in the early 1990s, van Amerongen and a group of like–minded caregivers began researching and designing a type of home where residents would participate in life, the same way they did before they entered a dementia care unit. ...

What Hogeweyk reveals is the culturally ingrained way we distinguish between those who do and don't suffer from dementia. By treating residents as normal people, Hogeweyk seems to suggest that there isn't such a huge difference, deep down – just differing needs. By designing a city tailored to those unique needs, residents avoid the dehumanisation that long–term medical care can unintentionally cause."

(All–Generations Care Services, 21 June 2014)

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2009ageing population • Alzheimers • ambachtelijke style • Amsterdam • artisan lifestyle • care centre • care home • care services • caregiver • Christian lifestyle • cultural lifestyle • day to day life • day to day surroundings • De Hogeweyk • degenerative brain illnesses • dementia • dementia sufferer • Dementia Village • dementiaville • elderly • environmental design • extreme dementia • familiar cues • familiar surroundings • familiarityfictional setting • Goois (upper class) • health and social carehealth care • Hogewey • Hogeweyk • Holland • homey • huiselijke • Indonesian • inhabitants • lifestyleliving togethermodel villageNetherlands • normal society living • nursing home • personal autonomypersonal freedom • personal independence • personal safety • personal wellbeing • pioneering institution • psychological perception • residential home • residents • senior citizen • simulationspatial cuesspatial environmentsThe Truman Show (1998)urban simulationvillage • Weesp • weyk • wijk • Yvonne van Amerongen

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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