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Which clippings match 'Euclidean Geometry' keyword pg.1 of 1
18 AUGUST 2015

Pioneering instructional animators Bruce and Katharine Cornwell

"Bruce and Katharine Cornwell are primarily known for a series of remarkable animated films on the subject of geometry. Created on the Tektronics 4051 Graphics Terminal, they are brilliant short films, tracing geometric shapes to intriguing music, including the memorable 'Bach meets Third Steam Jazz' musical score in 'Congruent Triangles.' Their work, distributed by the defunct International Film Bureau, is now out of distribution."

(Geoff Alexander, 2015, Academic Film Archive)

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TAGS

19762D animationabstract graphic animation • Academic Film Archive • basic geometric shapes • Bruce Cornwell • computer animationdigital pioneersearly computer-eraEuclidean geometrygeometric shapesgeometryinstructional materials • International Film Bureau (IFB) • Katharine Cornwell • mathematics educationmotion graphicspioneering animatorpolygon • Tektronix 4051 Graphics Terminal • triangle • visual representations of mathematical concepts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2013

The trouble with Kant's spatial metaphor

"In consequence of this revolutionary assertion Kant states that: 'Space is not an empirical concept which has been derived from outer experiences.' (B/38) On the contrary: '…it is the subjective condition of sensibility, under which alone outer intuition is possible for us.' (A/26; B/42)

In other words, Kant asserts that space (and time) are not objective, self–subsisting realities, but subjective requirements of our human sensory–cognitive faculties to which all things must conform. Space and time serve as indispensable tools that arrange and systemize the images of the objects imported by our sensory organs. The raw data supplied by our eyes and ears would be useless if our minds didn't have space and time to make sense of it all. ...

Kant's view of space (and time) is the groundwork of his Critique [of Pure Reason], However the inseparable bond he claimed between geometry and the nature of space serves to undermine his case rather than support it. ...

When Kant refers to geometry, he must mean Euclidean geometry, since Non–Euclidean geometry, the brainchild of the 19th Century, was unknown to him. Hence space, in Kant's philosophical system must conform to Euclidean geometry. Norman Kemp Smith, in his Commentary on the Critique, remarked that for Kant '…space in order to be space at all, must be Euclidean.'

Space, in Euclidean Geometry, is a concept which is independent of the attributes of our human minds and senses. The word Geometry is derived from Greek – geo 'earth', and metron 'to measure', namely 'earth measurement'. With such semantic–conceptual roots its hardly conceivable that Euclid regarded Geometry as divorced from an objective independent space."

(Pinhas Ben–Zvi, 2005, Philosophy Now)

Ben–Zvi, P. (2005). "Kant on Space." Philosophy Now, January/February 2005(49).

TAGS

cartographic metaphor • Critique of Pure Reason • empirical concept • Euclidean geometryeyes and earsgeometryGottfried Leibniz • human minds • human perception • human senses • human sensory-cognitive faculties • Immanuel KantIsaac Newtonlogical-analytical paradigmmetaphors of reality • nature of space • Non-Euclidean geometry • Norman Kemp Smith • noumena • noumenon • objective independent space • objective knowledgeobjective realityobjective world • outer experiences • philosophical system • self-subsisting realities • semantic construct • sensory organs • space and timespatial metaphorsubjective conditiontime

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 APRIL 2012

Marshall McLuhan debates his ideas on Australian TV in 1977

"In June 1977 Marshall McLuhan visited Australia and was a guest on Monday Conference, a popular live ABC television show hosted by Robert Moore. McLuhan debated his ideas with Moore and took questions from a feisty studio audience made up of members of the media and advertising industry, including TV boss Bruce Gyngell (see Part One at 14 mins), and young, funky Derryn Hinch (see Part Two from 3 mins).

McLuhan had been brought to Australia to address a broadcasting conference organised by Sydney radio station 2SM, and the Monday Conference was broadcast from the ballroom of the Sydney Hilton Hotel.

Many in the audience clearly admired McLuhan who has well into his prime and at ease with the live television situation. The discussion covered an eclectic range of topics, from television, privacy and Richard Nixon to holograms, transcendental meditation, Jane Austen, Euclidean geometry, denim jeans and nude streaking.

Towards the end of the program the always unpredictable McLuhan can be heard just off–mic, saying to Moore, 'I'm terribly sorry, but I'm going to have to sneak off and have a pee!'."

(ABC Radio National, Australia)

Fig.1,2&3 Marshall Mcluhan, lecture recorded by ABC Radio National Network on 27 June 1977 in Australia.

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TAGS

1977 • 2SM • ABC Radio National (Australia) • ABC Radio National Network • advertising industry • age of anxiety • age of electronic media • anxietyAustraliaAustralian Broadcasting CorporationBionic Woman • broadcasting conference • Bruce Gyngell • Canadiancommunicationcool mediumdebate • denim jeans • Derryn Hinchdigital eraelectronic mediaEuclidean geometryfolk artglobal villagehologram • hot medium • information anxietyinformation revolution • interconnectivity • InternetJane Austenlecture • live television • loss of privacy • Marshall McLuhanmass media age • McLuhan Project • media • media industry • media theory • media visionary • mediummedium is the messagemessage • Monday Conference (show) • networked societynostalgic yearning • nude streaking • privacyradio stationRichard Nixon • Robert Moore • studio audienceSydney • Sydney Hilton Hotel • television • The McLuhan Project • thinker • transcendental meditation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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