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Which clippings match 'Natural History' keyword pg.1 of 2
16 JUNE 2013

Marianne North: pioneering botanical artist

"Victorian artist Marianne North, one of the only women of her time to travel to places like the Seychelles Islands, Australia, and Chile, and who left behind a trail of impressive art and writing about her botanical discoveries, is not a household name. ...

In 1871, when a 40–year–old North set out after the death of her father to travel around the world and to paint as many of world's flora in oils as possible, she unwittingly found herself both ahead of and behind her times. In the art world, she was definitely not part of the avant–garde; in France, Claude Monet and Pierre–Auguste Renoir had already started their Impressionist paintings, creating works that were worlds away from the status quo of a polished depiction of nature.

North went around the world twice, in fifteen years, traveling by train, boat, mule, and on foot, to every continent, except for Antarctica. In Brazil, where she spent 13 months, North painted lush landscapes and tropical flowers with tight brushstrokes and clean lines – a style that would soon be left behind with the revolutionary style of the Impressionists. North didn't perceive or paint her subjects in a particularly unique way, but she relayed every minute detail of a plant, flower, or landscape with breathtaking precision. Her paintings give you a straight, dispassionate look at an unfamiliar world."

(Alexia Nader, Garden Design)

Fig.1 Marianne North, New Zealand Flowers and Fruit, Date painted: early 1880s, Oil on board, 50.9 x 35.4 cm, Collection: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

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TAGS

187119th centuryaccuracyAotearoa New ZealandartistAustraliabiodiversity • botanical artist • botanical record • BrazilCaliforniaCharles DarwinChiledepiction • dispassionate look • Edward Lear • fidelityfloragarden design • George Eliot • IndiaJapanKew Gardens • Marianne North • natural history • natural landscape • nature • non-European species • Origin of Speciespainting • painting nature • phytotomypioneering womenplant anatomyplantsscientific illustrationscientific illustrator • Seychelles • Seychelles Islands • travel • travel writing • travelogue • tropical plants • UK • unfamiliar world • Victorian art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2012

Dara Ó Briain's Science Club: A Dodo's Guide to Extinction

"A few hundred years ago, extinction as a concept made no sense to anyone. But then fossil finds and advances in geology showed that it's part of life, and a statistical certainty – even for human beings."

(BBC Two, UK)

Fig.1 this animation is from Episode 3 of 6 of Dara Ó Briain's Science Club, Tuesday 20 November at 9pm on BBC Two, voiced by Helen McCrory, animated by 12Foot6, Published on YouTube on 19 Nov 2012 by BBC.

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TAGS

12Foot620122D2D animation • 4004 BC • ages of fossils • ancient artefacts • animated information graphicsanimation • archaeological materials • BBC TwoBBC2Dara O Briain • deep time • devildinosaur • dodo • elephant • evolutionary change • evolutionary theoryevolutionary treeextinction • fossil • fossil specimen • geochronology • geologic time • geological timescales • geologist • geology • Georges Cuvier • history of ideas • Homo neanderthalensis • Homo sapiens neanderthalensis • human beingshuman speciesillustration to visually communicate information • invertebrates • James Hutton • James Ussher • lifemammalsmass extinctionnatural historynaturalist • neanderthal • Noah • radioactive dating • radioactive isotope • radiocarbon dating • radiometric dating • sabre-toothed cat • sabre-toothed tiger • scienceScience Club (tv)sequential artspecimen • Stellers sea cow • story of science • Tasmanian tiger • Tasmanian wolf • thylacine • tree of lifeUKvisual representations of scientific concepts • woolly mammoth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 MARCH 2009

Brought to Life: Exploring the History of Medicine

"The Science Museum of London is launching an ambitious and amazing sounding website this March [2009] entitled Brought to Life: Exploring the History of Medicine. The website will present images of, and details about, 2,500 fantastic objects illustrating centuries of medical history from around the world. Many of these objects have never been on public view; others are on display in the (wonderful) health and medicine galleries of the museum. The project is supported by the Wellcome Trust, and the website will feature access to items from the Wellcome Trust collection held by the Science Museum."
(Joanna Ebenstein, Morbid Anatomy)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 DECEMBER 2008

Cabinet of Curiosities Blog

"'Sharp, quirky, and occasionally nettlesome', Walking the Berkshires is my personal blog, an eclectic weaving of human narrative, natural history, and conservation science with the Berkshire and Litchfield Hills as both its backdrop and point of departure. I am interested in how land and people, past and present manifest in the broader landscape and social fabric of our communities. The opinions I express here are mine alone."
(Tim Abbott)

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TAGS

blogcabinet of curiositieseclectic • eclectic weaving • natural history • nettlesome • quirkyrepositorysocial fabric • Walking the Berkshires • weavingweaving together

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2006

Horniman Museum: An Evolving Private Collection

"Victorian tea trader Frederick John Horniman began collecting specimens and artefacts from around the World in the 1860's. Horniman's key mission was to bring the world to Forest Hill and he opened part of his family house to the public so they could view the riches he had collected. As the collections increased they outgrew the family home and in 1898 Horniman commissioned Charles Harrison Townsend to design a new Museum."
(Horniman Museum, UK)

Fig.1 Simon and Ashley, 'Interior of the main gallery in the Horniman Museum taken in 2006', http://www.flickr.com/people/10802072@N04.

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TAGS

anthropologyarchaeologyartefactcollection • Forest Hill • Horniman MuseumLondonmuseummusical instrumentnatural historyspecimen • taxidermy • UKVictorian
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