Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Natural' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 NOVEMBER 2012

A modern-day Luddite longing for the slow elegance of print culture

"Sven Birkerts, a modern–day Luddite, is feeling uneasy about all this rapid cultural change. He longs for the slow elegance of print culture. So much so, in fact, that the cover of his new book, [The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age], features a fuzzy caramel–colored snapshot of a naturally–lit library which houses the endangered species of digital modernity: a leather armchair draped with an afghan, droopy lace curtains, and shelves of softened leather hard–backs coveting thick yellowed pages and the tidy, immutable thoughts of yesterday's literary prophets.

Birkerts is terrified that his warm dusty paradise is being ransacked, and the remaining rubble is merely forgotten or misunderstood in a world distracted by garish, pulsing iconography."

(Amanda Griscom, 1996)

Amanda Scott Griscom (1996). "Trends of Anarchy and Hierarchy: Comparing the Cultural Repercussions of Print and Digital Media", Brown University.

1

TAGS

1996 • Amanda Griscom • authentic cultural iconauthenticitybookcultural changecultural codescultural materialismdesign essentialism • digital modernity • electronic ageend of print • garish • hardback • hardbound • hardcover • humanisation of technologyludditenatural • Ned Ludd • nostalgianostalgic yearningobsolescence • print culture • readingromanticism • Sven Birkerts • The Gutenberg Elegies • tradition

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2010

NextNature: What is our concept of nature?

"Despite the global awareness of our fragile relation with nature and the countless projects initiated to restore the balance, almost no one has asked the question: What is our concept of nature? And how is our relation with nature changing? ...

This website explores our changing notion of nature. How nature has become one of the most successful products of our time, yet much of what we perceive as nature is merely a simulation: a romanticized idea of a balanced, harmonic, inherently good and threatened entity. How evolution continues nonetheless. How technology–traditionally created to protect us from the forces of nature–gives rise to a next nature, that is just as wild, cruel, unpredictable and threatening as ever. How we are playing with fire again and again. How we should be careful in doing so, yet how this is also what makes us human."

(NextNature.net)

Fig.1 Aaron Koblin (2008). 'Video capture of SMS visualization tool looking at the city of Amsterdam on New Years Eve 2007. Data from KPN Telcom.'

Fig.2 Julia Müller, Arjan Groot and Menno Wittebrood. 'Birthmarks tattoo', Identity Matters magazine.

1
2

TAGS

applied researchawareness raisingbio-ethicsclimate changeconsumptiondesign intelligencedesign responsibilityenvironmentethicsgenetic engineering • human impact • industrialinformation aesthetics • Koert van Mensvoort • manufacturingnaturalnature • NextNature • obsolescenceposthumanreflexive modernisationromanticismsocial changesustainability • technological impact • technology and nature • transformationvisualisationwaste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MAY 2010

The Mutato-Archive: a collection of non-standard fruits, roots and vegetables

"The Mutato–Archive is a collection of non–standard fruits, roots and vegetables, displaying a dazzling variety of forms, colours and textures... The complete absence of botanical anomalies in our supermarkets has caused us to regard the consistency of produce presented there as natural. Produce has become a highly designed, monotonous product. ... The Mutato–Project serves to document, preserve and promote these last survivors of biological variety."

(Uli Westphal, 2006)

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JUNE 2009

Here & There: a horizonless projection in Manhattan

"Here & There is a project by S&W exploring speculative projections of dense cities. These maps of Manhattan look uptown from 3rd and 7th, and downtown from 3rd and 35th. They're intended to be seen at those same places, putting the viewer simultaneously above the city and in it where she stands, both looking down and looking forward."

1

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
07 JANUARY 2009

Body>Data>Space: Canary Wharf Waterfall

"Building Design Magazine (BD) has published an article by Elaine Knutt discussing the potential for telematic experiences to be constructed in public spaces by the use of interactive architectural surfaces. Telematics (tele–communication and informatics) broadly explores how communication has transformed our experience of social connectivity and new emergining patterns of communication and power structures.

Thanks to this article I was pleased to find out about a new group of artists and architects called bodydataspace ( b>d>s) created by Ghislaine Boddington and Armand Terruli who are exploring 'the integration of interactive and body–intuitive interfaces into public sites. Bodydataspace have proposed that Canary Wharf, London's tallest building 235m, have a giant projected waterfall cascading down its facade. The waterfall would not be a computer generated animation but a real–time projection of Angel Falls in Venezuela. the world's highest free–falling waterfall at 979m."
(Ruairi Glynn, Interactive Architecture dot Org)

1

TAGS

architectarchitectureartblogcityderivedigitaldigital architectureearth arteco artinstallationinteractive architecture • interactive architecture workshop • London • medialab arts • naturalnaturephysicalpsychogeography • Reciprocal Space • Ruairi Glynnscalespace • submerge innovation • telematic experiencetelematicsUKurbanismvirtualwaterweblog

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.