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17 APRIL 2015

A Guide to Practice Based Research

"Practice-based Research is an original investigation undertaken in order to gain new knowledge partly by means of practice and the outcomes of that practice. In a doctoral thesis, claims of originality and contribution to knowledge may be demonstrated through creative outcomes in the form of designs, music, digital media, performances and exhibitions. Whilst the significance and context of the cl aims are described in words, a full understanding can only be obtained with direct reference to the outcomes."

(Linda Candy, 2006, Creativity and Cognition Studios)

TAGS

2006Creativity and Cognition Studios (CCS) • invention of artefacts • invention of ideas • invention of images • invention of performances • knowledge and understanding • knowledge is embodied in an artefact • Linda Candy • new or substantially improved insights • original investigationpractice-based researchresearch by or through designresearch for designresearch through designresearch through practicetheory building

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JULY 2014

The art object does not embody a form of knowledge

"In this paper, I start from the position that the proper goal of visual arts research is visual art. An alternative position is that the art making process yields knowledge that is independent of the actual art objects produced. However, this relegates the art object to that of a by–product of the knowledge acquisition process, and, in my view, places visual art making in the service of some other discipline. Notwithstanding the fact that valuable knowledge may be acquired in this way, from my standpoint it would be undesirable for this to become the dominant mode of arts research. Therefore, from my position the most interesting proposition to explore is the claim that the art object is a form of knowledge since it locates the art object as a central and fundamental component of the knowledge acquisition process.

Nevertheless, as you will see, in this paper I argue against this proposition. I will not claim that the visual art object cannot communicate knowledge–it can. Instead, I will argue that this knowledge is typically of a superficial nature and cannot account for the deep insights that art is usually thought to endow into emotions, human nature and relationships, and our place in the World, etc. In short, I aim to demonstrate that visual art is not, nor has it ever been, primarily a form of knowledge communication; nor is it a servant of the knowledge acquisition enterprise."

(Stephen Scrivener, 2002)

Scrivener, Stephen (2002) "The art object does not embody a form of knowledge". Working Papers in Art & Design – Vol 2.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
12 FEBRUARY 2013

UK Arts & Humanities Research Council: A Definition of Research

"research activities should primarily be concerned with research processes, rather than outputs. This definition is built around three key features and your proposal must fully address all of these in order to be considered eligible for support:

It must define a series of research questions, issues or problems that will be addressed in the course of the research. It must also define its aims and objectives in terms of seeking to enhance knowledge and understanding relating to the questions, issues or problems to be addressed

It must specify a research context for the questions, issues or problems to be addressed. You must specify why it is important that these particular questions, issues or problems should be addressed; what other research is being or has been conducted in this area; and what particular contribution this project will make to the advancement of creativity, insights, knowledge and understanding in this area

It must specify the research methods for addressing and answering the research questions, issues or problems. You must state how, in the course of the research project, you will seek to answer the questions, address the issues or solve the problems. You should also explain the rationale for your chosen research methods and why you think they provide the most appropriate means by which to address the research questions, issues or problems.

Our primary concern is to ensure that the research we fund addresses clearly–articulated research questions, issues or problems, set in a clear context of other research in that area, and using appropriate research methods and/or approaches.

The precise nature of the research questions, issues or problems, approaches to the research and outputs of the work may vary considerably, embracing basic, strategic and applied research. The research questions, issues, problems, methods and/or approaches may range from intellectual questions that require critical, historical or theoretical investigation, to practical issues or problems that require other approaches such as testing, prototyping, experimental development and evaluation. The outputs of the research may include, for example, monographs, editions or articles; electronic data, including sound or images; performances, films or broadcasts; or exhibitions. Teaching materials may also be an appropriate outcome from a research project provided that it fulfils the definition above.

The research should be conceived as broadly as possible and so consideration should also be given to the outcomes of, and audiences for, the research. The outcomes of the research may only benefit other researchers and influence future research, but consideration must be given to potential opportunities for the transfer of knowledge into new contexts where the research could have an impact.

Creative output can be produced, or practice undertaken, as an integral part of a research process as defined above. The Council would expect, however, this practice to be accompanied by some form of documentation of the research process, as well as some form of textual analysis or explanation to support its position and as a record of your critical reflection. Equally, creativity or practice may involve no such process at all, in which case it would be ineligible for funding from the Council."

(Arts and Humanities Research Council)

TAGS

academic research • accompanying documentation • advancement of creativity • AHRCapplied researchartwork and exegesisbasic researchclinical researchcontribution to knowledge • creative output • critical investigationcritical reflection • definition of research • experimental development • historical investigation • impact and engagement • knowledge and understandingknowledge transfer • new contexts • new insights • problem for action • problems to be addressed • prototyping • record and reflect • research activities • research aims and objectives • research context • research impactresearch methodsresearch outcomeresearch processesresearch projectresearch questions • strategic research • testingtextual analysis • theoretical investigation • transfer of knowledgeUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 NOVEMBER 2012

Journal for Artistic Research: a focal point for diverse artistic voices

"Introducing a high–quality journal in the field allows an ever–increasing number of artistic researchers to partake in what for the sciences and humanities are standard academic publication procedures. Given that artistic research has become a worldwide movement with many local activities, JAR can serve as a focal point, bringing together diverse voices, facilitating the discourse and thus improving the artistic research community.

In the context of JAR, artistic research is doubly defined: insofar as it is research, it enhances knowledge and understanding; because it is artistic, however, the mode of presentation is essential. This definition excludes works of art that share modes of presentation with artistic research, but do not enhance understanding. It also excludes research that is not dependant on an artistic mode of presentation. Thus, the development of epistemological as well as artistic criteria for the exposure of artistic research is a key ambition of the Journal; part of JAR's mission is to re–negotiate art's relationship to academia and the role and function of research in artistic practice. Furthermore, JAR embraces research practices across disciplines, thereby emphasising the transdisciplinary character of much artistic research.

JAR's unique presentation of artistic research as 'weaves', instead of 'pages', facilitates multi–modal exposition, thereby meeting the desire of artistic researchers to have their work displayed and documented in a manner that demonstrates a respect for modes of presentation. By introducing, together with the RC, a standard for documentation, the Journal is responding to the international artistic and academic communities, which demand high quality referencing and documentation. Moreover, the Journal meets the need of art institutions such as museums, galleries and collections for artistic research to be more easily accessible."

(Michael Schwab)

Fig.1 Deborah Harty and Phil Sawdon (2010). "humhyphenhum: Still 5".

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TAGS

academic journalart and design researchart exhibitionart galleriesart museum • artistic mode of presentation • artistic practiceartistic research • artistic research community • artistic researchersarts institutionsarts practitionerarts researcharts researcherepistemological criteriafine art collections • high quality referencing • high-quality informationJAR (journal)Journal for Artistic Researchknowledge and understanding • modes of presentation • multi-modal exposition • Research Catalogue (service) • research practices • research requirementsSociety for Artistic Research (SAR)transdisciplinary research • weaving metaphor • weaving together

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 APRIL 2012

Revised AHRC Research Funding Guide for Practice-Led Research

"If you are applying for funding to support a practice–led research project, please read the following advice for framing your proposal.

For your research to be considered as practice–led, your own practice must be an integral part of the proposed programme of research, and the creative and/or performative aspects of the research must be made explicit. Interdisciplinary proposals are welcomed, including those which fall within subjects traditionally defined as humanities as long as the main focus of the research is practice–led.

The research carried out should bring about enhancements in knowledge and understanding in the discipline, or in related disciplinary areas. This requirement excludes research to provide content. For example, if a film–maker wanted to make a film about refugees, the research questions should be about the process of making the film, not about the experience of the refugees. Work that results purely from the creative or professional development of an artist, however distinguished, is unlikely to fulfil the requirements of research."

(AHRC, p.72)

2). Arts and Humanities Research Council (January 2012). "Research Funding Guide" Version 1.7

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TAGS

2012AHRCarts and humanitiesArts and Humanities Research Councilcontribution to knowledgecreative practice researchdesign research projectguidelinesHEI • Independent Research Organisation • interdisciplinary • interdisciplinary proposals • knowledge and understandingpractice-based research • programme of research • requirements of research • researchresearch fundingResearch Funding Guideresearch processresearch projectresearch questionsresearch requirementsUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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