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Which clippings match 'Innovative Design' keyword pg.1 of 1
19 NOVEMBER 2013

Applying Heidegger's Philosophy to Design

"Heidegger's philosophy offers what is arguably the most thorough account of the process of human understanding available. Although his analysis of interpretation is useful if one is to understand activities like innovative design, it never addresses the realm of design directly. Heidegger discusses interpretation at a high level of generality and chooses his examples from interactions between people and physical artifacts, like the use of hammers by carpenters. He is concerned with the nature of understandingly being in the world. While a person's world includes conceptual and imaginative realms like design, Heidegger's examples primarily come from the world of physical artifacts which can be encountered perceptually. ...

Heidegger treats artifacts in the world the same way he would treat design artifacts on the drawing board. That is, he is not really concerned with them as physically present objects of perception. On the contrary, his main effort philosophically is to distinguish artifacts–in–use from traditional conceptions of physically–present–objects. For example, a hammer in use is not understood by the carpenter as an observed object with physical attributes, but is skillfully applied to the activities of the current situation. Furthermore, this skillful use takes place within the context of future–oriented plans and desires, such as the anticipation of the item that is under construction. This is similar to components of a design, which are skillfully arranged in terms of their relationships to other design components and within the context of the anticipated final design. Marks in a design sketch, for instance, are important for their roles within a network of significances, rather than for their physical properties as lines. Interpretation of both physical artifacts and designs is situated. ...

The notion of breakdown in action plays a rather small role in Heidegger's analysis of human understanding. Heidegger uses examples of breakdown in order to make explicit the network of references among artifacts that are only present tacitly under conditions of normal use. Yet, the notion of breakdown has been elevated to central importance in the theories that have tried to adopt Heidegger's analysis to a theory of design and to operationalize this theory for computer support. Thus, breakdown plays an important role in Schön (1985), Winograd & Flores (1986), Suchman (1987), Ehn (1988), Budde & Züllighoven (1990), McCall, Morch, & Fischer (1990), Dreyfus (1991), Coyne & Snodgrass (1991), Fischer & Nakakoji (1992).

The fact that so many writers influenced by Heidegger have focused on breakdown does not provide multiple independent support for this emphasis. ... most of these writers have been influenced by Heidegger only indirectly–either through Dreyfus or through Schön. If one looks closely at the discussions of breakdown in Dreyfus and Schön, one can note an ambiguity in whether they are speaking about a (ontological) breakdown in the network of references or a (practical) breakdown in action. Dreyfus is certainly aware of the ontological role of breakdown, but he is concerned to make his presentation acceptable to an American audience, trained in the rationalist tradition. For the sake of concreteness, he uses examples that stress the breakdown in action. Schön is also aware of the ontological ramifications, but he has couched his discussion in terms of action (e.g., knowing–in–action, reflection–in–action), so it often seems that his examples of breakdown exemplify breakdowns in action rather than breakdowns in situated understanding. Given that it is easier to operationalize breakdowns in action than breakdowns in situated understanding, it is not surprising that people interested in producing practical results from Dreyfus or Schön's theories would tend to emphasize the action–oriented reading of the ambiguous discussions."

(Gerry Stahl, 5 January 2004)

TAGS

action-oriented reading • Adrian Snodgrass • Anders Morch • anticipation • artefacts-in-use • being-in-the-worldbreakdown • breakdown in action • breakdown in the network of references • breakdowns in action • breakdowns in situated understanding • carpenter • conceptual domain • concreteness • current situationdesign artefactsdesign innovation • design sketch • design theoryDonald Schon • drawing board • Fernando Floresflow • Gerhard Fischer • Gerry Stahl • hammer • Heinz Zullighoven • Hubert Dreyfushuman perception • human understanding • innovative design • knowing-in-action • Kumiyo Nakakoji • Lucy Suchman • Martin Heidegger • nature of understanding • network of references • network of significances • normal use • objects of perception • Pelle Ehn • philosophy of design • physical artefacts • physical attributes • physical properties • physically present • physically-present-objects • rationalist tradition • Raymond McCall • reflection-in-action • Reinhard Budde • Richard Coynesituated construction of realitysituated knowledgessketching ideas • skillful use • Terry Winogradtheory of design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 OCTOBER 2012

The Korea Institute of Design Promotion

"Korea (South) has recognized design as the future growth engine and has introduced 'Building a Creative Design Nation' as a new government project. The Korea Institute of Design Promotion (KIDP) lies at the center of national design promotion policies. KIDP has been putting its best efforts into promoting Korea as a global leader in the design community and as a result, has created a global design portal site that will compile design information in an integrated and systematic way.

Global DesignDB.com is an integrated online service system set up to manage the latest design information for designers and others involved in the global design industry. It will act as a 'Design Navigator' for anyone interested in design. We look forward to your continuous interests and support."

(The Korea Institute of Design Promotion)

Fig.1 Suzy Sunsook Cho, Package Design [http://suzycho.blogspot.co.uk/2011/04/package–design.html].

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TAGS

197021st centuryapplied arts • Building a Creative Design Nation • commoditycountry brandscreative design • creative design academy • creative design nation • creative economycreative industriescultural capitaldesign • design academy • design book cafe • design community • design companies • design information • design innovation • design navigator • design policy • design portal • design promotion • design promotion policies • designers • global design industry • government policy • government project • industrial centres • industrial competitiveness • innovative design • KIDP • knowledge economyKorea • Korea Institute of Design Promotion • national identity • North East Asia • Republic of Korea • South Korea

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2012

Welcome to the Era of Design

"All businesses, no matter what they make or sell, should recognize the power and financial value of good design.

Obviously, there are many different types of design: graphic, brand, packaging, product, process, interior, interaction/user experience, Web and service design, to name but a few. ...

You see, expecting great design is no longer the preserve of a picky design–obsessed urban elite – that aesthetically sensitive clique who'd never dare leave the house without their Philippe Starck eyewear and turtleneck sweaters and buy only the right kind of Scandinavian furniture. Instead, there's a new, mass expectation of good design: that products and services will be better thought through, simplified, made more intuitive, elegant and more enjoyable to use.

Design has finally become democratized, and we marketers find ourselves with new standards to meet in this new 'era of design.' To illustrate, Apple, the epitome of a design–led organization, now has a market capitalization of $570 billion, larger than the GDP of Switzerland. Its revenue is double Microsoft's, a similar type of technology organization but one not truly led by design (just compare Microsoft Windows with Apple's Lion operating system)."

(Adam Swann, 5/03/2012, Forbes)

Fig.1 "Mille Miglia" bicycle by VIVA [http://www.vivabikes.com/].

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TAGS

advertisingaestheticsAmazon.comApple • Apple Care • applied discipline • B2Bbrandbrandingbrandsbusiness • business to business • CMO Network • competitive advantagecreativity • customer recommendation • customer satisfaction • customer-centric • customersdesign • design-led organisation • elegant design • employee satisfaction • enjoyable to use • era of design • experience design • feel good • financial value • First Direct • Forbesgood designgraphic designhyperconnectedIKEAinnovative designinteraction designinterior designintuitive designleadership • led by design • marketer • marketingmeaningful experiences • Michael Eisner • MicrosoftMicrosoft Windows • new era • new standardsoperating systempackagingPhilippe StarckPinterest • process design • product design • rewarding experiences • service design • service touchpoints • social media • social-media-fueled society • Switzerland • urban elite • user experience designweb design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MAY 2012

Folding Plug System: redesigning the UK 3-pin plug

"'Mac book Air,' Apple's latest master–piece, is the world's thinnest laptop ever. However, here in the U.K, we still use the world's biggest three–pin plug. Most people carry laptops with adapters and plugs because laptop batteries have limitations on the time they can be used. When people carry laptops with U.K plugs in a bag, it always causes problems such as tearing paper, scratching laptop surfaces and, sometimes, it breaks other stuff. The main problem is the UK standard 3–pin plug is not considered in the process of designing for mobility. My intention of the project was directed to make the plug as slim as possible and follow the British Standard regulation at the same time."

(Min–Kyu Choi, 20 April 2009, http://www.minkyu.co.uk/Site/Product/Entries/2009/4/20_Folding_Plug_System.html)

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TAGS

19462009 • AC • AC power plugadaptersApple • Apple MacBook Air • British Standard • compact • designdesign innovation • designing for mobility • engineering regulationa • everyday • everyday product • folded plugs • foldingindustrial designinnovationinnovative designlaptoplaptops • MacBook Air • mains plug • Min-Kyu Choiminiaturisation • multi-plug adaptor • plug • power cord • power lead • power plug • power plugs • productproduct designredesignredesigningRoyal College of Art • slim • slimline • smart design • space saver • standard plug • standard UK plug • three-pin plug • UK • UK standard • UK standard 3-pin plug • wafer thin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MARCH 2012

Stylus: business intelligence and inspiration to drive new ideas

"Culture & Media reveals how the worlds of entertainment, media and digital and the creative side of marketing and advertising influence cultural movements that impact on business decisions. Expert reports on art, graphics, illustration and global exhibitions offer visual inspiration for inquisitive creative minds."

(Stylus media group)

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TAGS

account manager • active leisure time • advertisingart and cultureart worldB2Bbrand managerbrand strategy • business decisions • buyers • childrenswear • colour • colour trends • commercial implications • commercial insightconsumer lifestylesconsumer productsconsumer products in homeconsumer trendscreative business insightscreative directorcreative industriescreative intelligence • creative marketing • creative media • creatively led retailing • cross-sector innovation • culture and media • design and cultural influences • design inspirationdesign magazinedesign resourcedesign trendsdigital commerce • entertainment news • expert information • expert report • fashion buyers • fashion design • fashion designers • fashion manufacturing • fashion retail • furniture designfuture concepts • gastronomy • global analysis • global expert opinion • global information • graduate showsgraphic designerhome accessories • hospitality • in-depth analysis • industrial design • industry executives • innovative design • inquisitive creative minds • insider guides • inspirational destinations • inspirational visual contentinspiring design • inspiring illustration • interior architectureinterior stylingknowledge based economyleisure industrieslifestyle • marketing manager • material trends • materials innovationmenswear • merchandise planner • merchandising and management • new productsnew servicesonline magazine • packaging designer • product designer • product developer • product directions • product launches • product manager • retail analysis • retail landscape • revenue-building ideasscience and technology • seasonal colour inspiration • sports and leisure • sports industries • store design • Stylus (magazine) • subscription service • sustainable thinking • technology innovationtextilestravel and leisure • travel industries • trend analysis • trend setting • trendsvisual communicationvisual culturevisual designvisual inspiration • visual merchandiser • visual merchandisingwomenswear • youth and beauty

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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