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Which clippings match 'Mythology' keyword pg.1 of 2
20 JULY 2012

Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Memory Board (Lukasa)

"Lukasa, or memory boards, are hand–held wooden objects that present a conceptual map of fundamental aspects of Luba culture. They are at once illustrations of the Luba political system, historical chronicles of the Luba state, and territorial diagrams of local chiefdoms. Each board's design is unique and represents the divine revelations of a spirit medium expressed in sculptural form. While many lukasa utilize a system of denotation based on masses of shells and beads affixed to their wooden surfaces, this example communicates its content through incised designs and images carved in relief."

(The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Fig.1 "Memory Board (Lukasa) [Democratic Republic of Congo; Luba] (1977.467.3)". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works–of–art/1977.467.3 (October 2006).

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19th century • ancestress • ancestry • arcane knowledge • art historybeads • carapace • carved relief • carvingchart • chevron • chief • chiefdom • circular elements • collectionconceptual mapconceptual metaphorcrocodilecultural formsculture • decipher and interpret • Democratic Republic of Congo • denote • diagram • divine revelations • facehand-heldHeilbrunn Timeline of Art Historyhistorical chronicleshistorical figuresillustrationinformation aestheticsinterdependenceinterpretation • kaloba • kikungulu • king • kitenta • Lolo Ina Nombe • Luba • lukasa • mbudye • memory • memory aid • memory board • Metropolitan Museum of Artmnemonicmotifmythologynotation • ovoid • physical geography • political organisation • political system • religious geography • representationsculptural formsculpturesymbolism • system of denotation • the spiritual world of ancestorstimeline • turtle • visual communicationvisualisationwood • wooden object • zoomorphic

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MARCH 2012

Coding cultural riches: Investigating indigenous languages in Australia

"It's very fundamental to Aboriginal belief that language and land are connected, and it is appropriate to speak the language of the land on which you're residing. So it was quite natural that Murrinh–Patha would have become the primary language of the indigenous people living on the mission."

(Rachel Nordlinger)

Fig.2 "Coding cultural riches: Investigating indigenous languages in Australia: Linguist Dr Rachel Nordlinger discusses how Australian Aboriginal languages are researched and how particular indigenous tongues grow at the expense of others as communities migrate. Presented by Jennifer Cook.", Up Close, University of Melbourne.

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Aboriginal languages • Aboriginal mythologyancestorsAustralia • Australian Aboriginal languages • Australian Aboriginal On-line TelevisionAustralian Aborigine • Australian languages • belief systems • Bilinarra • coding cultural riches • creole • creole language • cultural codes • cultural coding • cultural identitydescribingdocumenting • dreamtime • Dreamtime ancestors • East Timor • East Timorese languages • grammar • grammatical structures • identityIndigenousIndigenous AustraliansIndigenous language • indigenous languages • indigenous tongues • Jennifer Cook • kinship categories • language • language of landscape • language of the landscape • limits of my language are the limits of my worldlingo • linguist • linguistics • morphological theory • Murrinh-Patha • mythologyNorthern Territory • Pacific linguistics • podcast • Rachel Nordlinger • recording • syntactic theory • Tetun Dili • traditional languages • University of Melbourne • Up Close (podcast) • Wambaya

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 DECEMBER 2009

The Illusion of Magnitude: Adapting the Epic from Film to Television

"When Giuseppe de Liguoro's Homer's Odyssey (1910) was released in the U.S. in 1912, a review in The Moving Picture World praised it for beginning 'a new epoch in the history of the motion picture as a factor in education' (1). The ambitious claim was made amid the author's desire to see moving pictures adapt Classic sources in such a way to both 'entertain and instruct the average moving picture audience' (2). This aspiration was repeated in the reviews of early U.S. television, which broadcast its own modest 'epics' in the 1950s and '60s in response to the revival of the cinematic epic. Although constrained by limited budgets and an even more limited screen size, television's version of the epic during the 1950s and '60s was applauded for bringing both spectacle and the high–cultural status of Classical works to this often–maligned medium. Focusing on contemporary reviews, this article argues that adaptations of myth were used to promote (and contest) the legitimacy of early television in the United States. (3)"

(Djoymi Baker)

1. W. Stephen Bush, "Homer's Odyssey. Three Reels. (Milano Films.)", The Moving Picture World, Vol. 11, No. 11, 16 March 1912, p. 941.

Fig.1 Francesco Bertolini, Adolfo Padovan and Giuseppe de Liguoro, 1911. 'Homer's Odyssey'

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1911 • adaptation • Adolfo Padovan • cinema • classic • Classicalclassicsepicepic spectacularfilmfilm adaptation • Francesco Bertolini • Giuseppe de Liguoro • history • Homer • mediummini-series • Moving Picture World (magazine) • mythologicalmythologyodysseySenses of Cinema (journal)spectaclespectaculartelevisionvisual communicationvisual spectacular epic

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2008

Cindy Sherman’s work functions seamlessly (and successfully) within late capitalist society

"Although [Cindy] Sherman is often heralded as the quintessential 'postmodern' artist, the modernist tendencies of her work coupled with the critics' inability to confront the ambiguity of her work, have rendered her 'postmodern' label problematic. Postmodern theory advocates a deconstruction of the power structures embedded in late capitalist society. But Sherman's work functions seamlessly (and successfully) within the market strategies of the '80s, typified by corporate control of museums and market control of galleries. Given that her work can be read as both a challenge to the art market and a creative, marketable product, the boundary between postmodern critique of the market and marketability has clearly been eroded. While critics applaud Sherman's work for deconstructively denying the totality of a 'real Cindy', the meaning of her work is dependent upon the concept of the celebrity 'Cindy'. Simultaneously, critics partially negate her 'deconstruction', mythologizing her as the autonomous 'artist–genius', harkening back to the modernist heroization of the creative individual. On one level, Sherman's work appears to be subversively linked to 'low' art characterized by 'b–grade' film and photography, on another level, her work is fetishized as the modernist ideal of the 'high' art object."
(Nadine Lemmon)

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1980sambiguityartart marketart objectartist • artist-genius • authorship • b-grade • b-moviecapitalismcelebrityCindy Shermancreative practicecritiquecultural signalsculture jammingdeconstruction • film still • film stylisationgenius • heroine • late capitalist society • low art • modernismmuseummythologynarrative photographyphotographyPostmodernpowerpower structuresproductsexual fetish

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2008

Anatomic Illustrations of Japanese Mythological Creatures

"This diagram showing a medical cross–section of Godzilla was created in 1967 by Shogo Endo for a book called An Anatomical Guide to Monsters. Apart from Godzilla it contains a variety of anatomical drawings of many other kaijus, including Mothra, Gamera and Agurius."

(Omar Kardoudi, 23 May 2014)

Shoji Otomo (writer) and Shogo Endo (illustrator) (1967). "An Anatomical Guide to Monsters".

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1967 • An Anatomical Guide to Monsters (1967) • anatomical illustrationanatomical pathologyanatomiesanatomyanimalanimal anatomyanimal physiologybeastcharacter designdiagramfantasy • Gamera • Ghidorah • Godzilla • imaginaryJapan • kaiju • legendary creaturemonster • Mothra • mythmythological creaturemythologyphysiology • Shogo Endo • Shoji Otomo • tokusatsu • visual communication • zootomy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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