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Which clippings match 'Myth' keyword pg.1 of 2
11 MARCH 2014

A portal to the underworld in Jean Cocteau's Orphée (1950)

"Jean Cocteau's update of the Orpheus myth depicts a famous poet (Jean Marais), scorned by the Left Bank youth, and his love for both his wife, Eurydice (Marie Déa), and a mysterious princess (Maria Casarès). Seeking inspiration, the poet follows the princess from the world of the living to the land of the dead, through Cocteau's famous mirrored portal. Orpheus's peerless visual poetry and dreamlike storytelling represent the legendary Cocteau at the height of his powers."

(The Criterion Collection)

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1950after deathafterlifeallegoryblack and whiteboundary-crossing • Classical mythology • contemplating mortality • Criterion Collection • deathdreamdreamlike storytellingEurydicefantasy about deathglass portalgloveheterotopiain-limboJean CocteauJean Marais • land of the dead • Left Bank youth • legendlove • love and death • love story • Maria Casares • Marie Dea • mirror • mirrored portal • mortalitymythOrphee (1950)Orpheus • Orpheus (1950) • Orpheus myth • otherworldlinessplaceless placeplacelessnesspoetportalprincessSFXspecial effectssurrealist cinemathreshold spaceunderworld • visual poetry • visual spectaclewaterwife • world of the living

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2012

Immortals: visual effects spectacular epic

Immortals is a "2011 3D action–adventure fantasy film directed by Tarsem Singh and starring Henry Cavill, Freida Pinto, and Mickey Rourke. The film was previously named Dawn of War and War of the Gods before being officially named Immortals and is loosely based on the Greek myth of Theseus and the Minotaur and the Titanomachy."

(movieclipsTRAILERS, 17 August 2011, YouTube)

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2011action-adventure • Ares • Athenacostume designCrete • Daniel Sharman • Dawn of War • Demeter • digital 3D • Eiko Ishioka • epic spectacular • Epirus Bow • fantasticfantasy filmfictional worldfilm • Freida Pinto • gods • Greek myth • green screen • Henry Cavill • Heracles • Hyperion • Immortals • Immortals (film) • Isabel Lucas • John Hurt • legendary weapon • Mickey Rourke • Minotaur • mythmythologicalmythological being • Olympians • oracle • Phaedra • Poseidon • RealD 3D • Relativity Media • revengeSFXspecial effectsspectacular • Stephen Dorff • Tarsem Singh • Tartarus • Theseus • Titan Hyperion • Titanomachy • Titans • Universal Pictures • VFXvisual effectsvisual spectaclevisual spectacularvisual spectacular epic • War of the Gods • world of the storyZeus

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MARCH 2012

Jean Cocteau: la Belle et la Bête

"La lumière brillante et surnaturelle qui avait dominé toute la scène du château (flamme des chandeliers, feu, reflets étincelants de l'argenterie) s'estompe pour laisser la place à la lumière naturelle du jour [plan 9] [9]. Ces rayons lumineux rappellent ceux des dernières gravures de la Belle au vois dormant. D'autant plus que cette lumière naturelle n'est pas légitimée par la présence d'une fenêtre, comme c'est le cas chez Doré. C'est une lumière naturelle, la lumière du jour, mais elle semble toujours éclairer le personnage de manière surnaturelle : comment la lumière extérieure peut–elle pénétrer à l'intérieur sans la présence d'aucune fenêtre ? Les flambeaux s'éteignent un à un, le personnage traverse un grand pan de lumière blanche, la porte se referme toute seule, l'escalier apparaît en plongée : la scène semble se rejouer à l'envers, ce qui souligne la structure circulaire et la clôture de la séquence, mais aussi l'influence de l'œuvre de Gustave Doré. Le dialogue des contes et des illustrations se poursuit jusqu'à la dernière image de la séquence puisqu'elle se termine sur les ronces qui envahissent l'escalier du château de la Bête, comme celles qui envahissent les gravures du château de la Belle au bois dormant."

(Estelle Plaisant Soler, 26 juin 2006)

Fig.1 Jean Cocteau (1946). "la Belle et la Bête"

2). PDF of 100 Cult Films (Screen Guides).

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1946atmosphericbeastbeauty • candlebra • candlestick • caryatids • castlechandelierscostume design • daylight • eerie • enchanted garden • engraving • external light • externalisation • extinguished • fairy talefantasyfilmfilm designfireflameFrenchgloveGustave Dorehorse • iconogaphy • in the mindinterior spaceJean CocteauJean Marais • Josette Day • Jungian • key • La Belle et la Bete • light • living arms • Madame Leprince de Beaumont • magic • merchant • metaphormotion picturemyth • natural light • Prince Charmingrealityset design • silverware • Sleeping Beauty • smoke-breathing • sparkling reflections • spatial symbolismspecial effectsstaircasestory • supernatural • surrealismsymbolismtalismantheatrical space • torch • visual designvisual metaphorvisual spectacle • white light

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2011

Drunk Driving Prevention: advertising campaigns

"Since launching this campaign in 1983, more than 68% of Americans exposed to the advertising have tried to prevent someone from driving drunk. In 1998, America experienced its lowest number of alcohol–related fatalities since the U.S. Department of Transportation began keeping records. Campaign taglines have included: 'Drinking & Driving Can Kill A Friendship' and 'Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk.'"

(The Advertising Council, USA)

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a few drinks • AAA • AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety • advertising campaignalcoholalcohol abuse • alcohol-related driving deaths • alcohol-related traffic fatalities • buzzed • buzzed driving • Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving • careless drivingco-optionconsequencesdangerous drivingdrink • drink driving • drinking alcohol • drinking and driving • driving • driving buzzed • driving drunk • driving under the influence • driving while intoxicated • drug taking • drunk • drunk driving • drunken driving • DUI • DWI • eating food • emotive manipulation • excess alcohol • humorous spot • impaired drivers • impaired driving • myth • operating under the influence • overtly drunk drivers • PSApublic information advertisementpublic service announcementsafetytransport safetyTV commercial • under the influence of alcoho

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 FEBRUARY 2009

The engineer is a myth produced by the bricoleur

"If one calls bricolage the necessity of borrowing one's concept from the text of a heritage which is more or less coherent or ruined, it must be said that every discourse is bricoleur. The engi~eer, whom Levi–Strauss opposes to the bricoleur, should be one to construct the totality of his language, syntax, and lexicon. In this sense the engineer is a myth. A subject who would supposedly be the absolute origin of his own discourse and would supposedly construct it 'out of nothing,' 'out of whole cloth,' would be the creator of the verbe, the verbe itself. The notion of the engineer who had supposedly broken with all forms of bricolage is therefore a theological idea; and since Levi–Strauss tells us elsewhere that bricolage is mythopoetic, the odds are that thee engineer is a myth produced by the bricoleur. From the moment that we cease to believe in such an engineer and in a discourse breaking with the received historical discourse, as soon as it is admitted that every finite discourse is bound by a cenain bricolage, and that the engineer and the scientist are also species of bricoleurs then the very idea of bricolage is menaced and the difference in which it took on its meaning decomposes."
(Jacques Derrida)

Jacques Derrida, Writing and Difference, trans. Alan Bass. London: Routledge, pp 278–294

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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