Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Personal Satisfaction' keyword pg.1 of 1
18 MARCH 2013

Younger Workers Need a Career Narrative

"In recent years, much has been written about the importance of career narratives for mid–career and senior professionals, particularly those making a career transition. But, we'd argue, they're even more important for younger professionals who don't yet have a multipage CV or a high–powered headhunter in their corner. What, then, makes for an effective narrative?

First, it should be easy to remember and retell. The whole point is to give your colleagues a narrative that quickly comes to mind whenever they're asked about you, preventing them from making assumptions and drawing conclusions on their own. Two or four sentences, maximum.

Second, it should meaningfully link your past successes to your near and long–term development needs and suggest the kinds of assignments that would help to achieve those objectives. Those goals might certainly be developmental (to test a particular skill; gain experience with a certain tool or methodology; explore a specific industry). But they can also be more personal (limit travel to spend time with family, for instance).Think of it as a 'sound–bite resume' – on hearing it, senior professionals should have two reactions. First, they should be interested in working with you. Second, they should know if it makes sense for you to work with them.

Third, your narrative needs to hang together with the right combination of honesty, humility, and personal flavor. Doing so creates an authentic and compelling career narrative. Narratives that just articulate a string of successes are not credible and are not likely to be repeated. Similarly, boilerplate chronicles without any personal flair rarely get traction."

(Heidi K. Gardner and Adam Zalisk, 15 February 2013, Harvard Business Review)

TAGS

careercareer developmentcareer journeycareer narrativecareer pathcareer planningcareer progressioncareer story • career transition • curriculum vitae • CV • Harvard Business Reviewhuman resourcesleadershiplearning journeynarrative accountorganisational behaviourorganisational capabilities • organisational development • organisational productivitypersonal knowledge mappingpersonal satisfactionprofessional developmentprofessional skillsresume • senior professionals • sound-bite resume • strategysuccesstailored curriculumtailoring curriculumworkplace • younger professionals

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 NOVEMBER 2009

Manipulating Unconscious Desires: The Century of the Self

"Adam Curtis' acclaimed series examines the rise of the all–consuming self against the backdrop of the Freud dynasty.

To many in both politics and business, the triumph of the self is the ultimate expression of democracy, where power has finally moved to the people. Certainly the people may feel they are in charge, but are they really? The Century of the Self tells the untold and sometimes controversial story of the growth of the mass–consumer society in Britain and the United States. How was the all–consuming self created, by whom, and in whose interests?

The Freud dynasty is at the heart of this compelling social history. Sigmund Freud, founder of psychoanalysis; Edward Bernays, who invented public relations; Anna Freud, Sigmund's devoted daughter; and present–day PR guru and Sigmund's great grandson, Matthew Freud.

Sigmund Freud's work into the bubbling and murky world of the subconscious changed the world. By introducing a technique to probe the unconscious mind, Freud provided useful tools for understanding the secret desires of the masses. Unwittingly, his work served as the precursor to a world full of political spin doctors, marketing moguls, and society's belief that the pursuit of satisfaction and happiness is man's ultimate goal."

(InformationLiberation, 21 March 2006)

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.