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Which clippings match 'Vintage Technology' keyword pg.1 of 2
16 MARCH 2014

Space Invaders (1978): the groundbreaking arcade game

"Space Invaders is quite simply the most influential video–game of all time. A single player moves an armed 'base' left or right along the bottom of the screen and shoots the endless waves of aliens marching relentlessly down the screen towards earth. There are four buildings (shields) at the bottom of the screen that the player can hide behind, but these will eventually be destroyed by either enemy missiles or by direct contact with the invaders themselves. The player's shots will also destroy the shields. The aliens' descent quickens as they are eliminated, making them harder to hit. A flying saucer will fly across the top of the screen at regular intervals and can be shot to earn extra points."

(Alexis Bousiges and Kukulcan, Arcade–History)

Fig.2 Youths play on a Space Invaders machine in Newcastle (UK) in December 1980.

Fig.3 Space World, Auckland (Aotearoa New Zealand), 1982.

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19788-bitalien beingsarcade gamearcade machine • Arcade Video Game • Arcade-History • black and whiteclassic video gamescoin operatedcomputer historygroundbreakinghistory and culturehistory of video gamesinfluential works • misspent youth • shootoutSpace Invadersspacies • Taito Corporation • Tomohiro Nishikado • UFOvideo gamevideo game consolevintage technology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

Sinclair ZX81: semigraphical / pseudographical characters

"If you press GRAPHICS (shifted 9) then the cursor will come up as : this means graphics mode. If you type in a symbol it will appear in its inverse video form, & this will go on until you press GRAPHICS again or NEWLINE. RUBOUT will have its usual meaning. Be careful not to lose the cursor  amongst all the inverse video characters you've just typed in. ...

Right at the beginning are space & ten patterns of black, white & grey blobs; further on there are eleven more. These are called the graphics symbols & are used for drawing pictures. You can enter these from the keyboard, using graphics mode (except for space, which is an ordinary symbol using the  cursor; the black square is inverse space). You use the 20 keys that have graphics symbols written on them. For instance, suppose you want the symbol , which is on the T key. Press GRAPHICS to get the  cursor, & then press shifted T. From the previous description of the graphics mode, you would expect to get an inverse video symbol; but shifted T is normally <>, a token, & tokens have no inverses: so you get the graphics symbol  instead."

(Steven Vickers, 1981, Sinclair Research Limited)

Fig.1 "graphics mode" table from Steven Vickers (1981). "Sinclair ZX81 BASIC Programming", Second Edition 1981, Copyright 1980 Sinclair Research Limited (converted to HTML by Robin Stuart).

2). Matthew Eagles (2008). "ZX81 VDU" TrueType font which replicates the letters, numbers etc. displayed on the screen of the ZX81.

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1980s19818-bitbasic geometric shapesblack and white • block graphics • computer historygeometric figuresgeometric shapes • graphic symbols • graphical building block • graphics mode • history of computinghome computerindustrial archaeologymanualmonotone • PETSCII • pictorial systemspixel matrix • pseudographics • semigraphical characters • semigraphics • Sinclair Research Ltd • Sinclair ZX80 • Sinclair ZX81 • sixels • symbolsymbolstypefacevintage technologyvisualisationZX81

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2012

Computer History Museum: Selling the Computer Revolution

"The brochures selected here (just a fraction of the Museum's holdings in this area) show some of the more important technologies, companies, and applications in computing from 1948 to 1988. This covers the period from mechanical and relay–based computers to those based on the microprocessor – a remarkable transition that occurred over only 25 years. We hope you enjoy browsing through these historical documents."

(Computer History Museum)

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1940s1950s1960s1970s1980sanalogue computerAppleApple LisaApple PCArs TechnicaAtariBBC Microbrochure • Burroughs Corporation • COBOL • CommodoreCommodore 64computercomputer historyComputer History Museum • computer revolution • David Ogilvy • device • file system • Fortranhistorical documentshistoryhistory of computingIBMIBM PC • IBM PCjr • important technologiesindustrial archaeologyindustrial designinformation ageinnovationMad Menmainframemarketing campaignmaterial culturemechanical computer • microprocessor • museumPCproduct design • relay-based computers • retrosales brochureselling the computer revolutiontechnological change • technological evolution • technological innovationtechnologytechnology companiestechnology marketingtechnophobiaTexas Instrumentstransitional technologiesUNIVAC 9000 Seriesvintage technology • Wang Laboratories • ZX Spectrum

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2012

Gender difference portrayed in vintage business equipment brochures

This collection of photos from business equipment brochures dramatically shows the extent to which our assumptions about gender roles have changed.

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1960s1970sbrochure • business equipment • business equipment brochure • business machine • business machines • computercomputer historygendergender differentiationgender politicsgender rolesgendered technologygenderisationhistoryhistory of computingIBMimage collectionmainframematerial culture • office equipment • retrosales brochureselling the computer revolutionsex sellstechnology marketing • UNIVAC • UNIVAC 9000 Seriesvintage technologywomen and technology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MARCH 2012

Extensive collection of vintage pocket calculators

"1970s Vintage desktop and pocket calculators listed by company (131 identified brands, 613 calculators). ..., it is crazy to think that in many of these calculators you have a chip that is bigger in size than one of the Intel Core Family processors."

(Vintage Technology)

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1970s20th centuryarchaeologyartefactcache • calc • calculator • calculators • collection • company list • computer historyconsumer electronics • desktop calculator • digital technologyelectronicselectronics industrygadgethistory of information technology • Intel Core • LCD • material archive • material cultureobsolescenceobsoleteobsolete technology • pocket calculator • prehystories of new media • processor • product designredundant technology • technical collection • technological changetechnologytechnology and culturetechnology innovationvintagevintage technology • web museum

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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