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19 DECEMBER 2013

UK Department for Business, Innovation & Skills

"The Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS) is the department for economic growth. The department invests in skills and education to promote trade, boost innovation and help people to start and grow a business. BIS also protects consumers and reduces the impact of regulation."

(GOV.UK)

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TAGS

2009 • British businesses • consumer law • Department for Business Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR) • Department for Business Innovation and Skills (BIS)Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) • Department for Innovation Universities and Skills (DIUS) • economic growth • employment market • flexible working • further educationgovernment policy • grow a business • higher educationinnovation • Manufacturing Advisory Service (MAS) • researchscience research • shared parental leave • skills and education • UKUK Government

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

Consultation to reclassify and measure the UK Creative Industries

"The purpose of this consultation is to update the DCMS Creative Industries classification and we are inviting input from interested parties. We have been engaging with industry and partner organisations over potential changes via a Technical Working Group of the Creative Industries Council and are now at a point where we would like to go out to consultation and seek wider views.

We have been working with partners (NESTA, Creative Skillset and Creative and Cultural Skills), to review and update the classification used in the DCMS Creative Industries Economic Estimates (CIEE). We intend to use this review 'Classifying and Measuring the Creative Industries', referenced below, as an objective starting point to suggest which occupations and industries should be included in the updated DCMS classification.

The review uses the idea of 'creative intensity' (the proportion of people doing creative jobs within each industry) to suggest which industries should be included. If the proportion of people doing creative jobs in a particular industry is substantial, above a 30% threshold, the industries are candidates for inclusion within the Creative Industries classification.

Similar to the outlook in our current Creative Industries Economic Estimates, the 'creative intensity' approach focuses on industries where the creative activity happens. The intention is to produce a classification which provides direct estimates of employment and the contribution to the economy, with no double counting – rather than attempting to capture all activity further down the value chain, for example, retail activities. The classification generated in this way can be used as a starting point for indirect estimates which include wider economic effects along the supply chain.

Any approach has data and methods constraints, which may affect some industries more than others. These limitations are reflected in the consultation and consultees are invited to suggest alternatives, supported by evidence–based argument. Weaknesses in the underlying classifications and data used to construct these estimates, which are identified by users, will be fed–back to the organisations which set these standards and provide these data so that we can influence longer–term improvements."

(Department for Culture, Media & Sport, 19 April 2013)

TAGS

2013 • CIEE • classificationclassification scheme • Classifying and Measuring the Creative Industries • contribution to the economy • creative activity • Creative and Cultural Skills • creative industries • Creative Industries classification • Creative Industries Economic Estimates • creative intensity • creative jobs • creative occupations • Creative Skillset • data constraints • DCMS • DCMS Creative Industries Economic Estimates • Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) • economic effects • estimate • estimation • evidence-based argument • government consultation • longer-term improvements • measurement • methods constraints • NESTAproposals • proposed changes • public consultationreview • SOC • Standard Occupational Classification • supply chain • Technical Working Group of the Creative Industries Council • UKUK Governmentvalue chain

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

Neville Brody: removal of design from school curriculum is 'insanity'

"plans to remove creative subjects from the UK curriculum are 'short–sighted insanity', according to incoming D&AD president Neville Brody (+ interview).

Speaking to Dezeen, Brody described government plans to overhaul the curriculum as 'one of the biggest mistakes in British government' and added: 'The UK government is trying to demolish and smash all ideas about creative education.'

In September, education secretary Michael Gove announced plans to replace GCSE examinations for students up to the age of 16 with a new English baccalaureate (EBacc) system. Creative subjects such as art and design will not count towards the EBacc qualifications, which instead are graded on performance in academic 'stem' subjects. These stem subjects are English, mathematics, history or geography, the sciences and a language. ...

'The creative industries need high–quality creative graduates. If we're not getting the graduates, we're not going to sustain the industry,' said Brody. 'Creative services as a percentage of GDP is higher here than any other country, so why would you not want to support, promote and build that?'"

(Dezeen, 26 November 2012)

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2012Andrew Marrart and designart schools • arts students • British Government • creative education • creative graduates • creative industriescreative professionscreative servicescreative subjectsD and ADdesign curriculumDezeenEBacceducation budgetEnglish BaccalaureateGCSE • GDP • graphic design agency • Michael GoveNeville Brody • non-UK students • overseas students • Research Studios (agency) • Royal College of Art • school of communication • skilled dangerous minds • STEM • studying arts • UKUK Governmentvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Chris Treweek
15 NOVEMBER 2012

UK Reviewing the new Design & Technology Curriculum

Reviewing the new Design & Technology Curriculum
Westminster Education Forum National Curriculum Seminar Series 2013
Timing: Morning, Wednesday, 13th February 2013
Venue: Central London

"As the Government concludes its National Curriculum review, this timely seminar focuses on the content of the new curriculum for Design and Technology (D&T) for each Key Stage, due to be introduced into schools from September 2014 – as well as the implementation challenges for schools. It will bring together key policymakers with school and college leaders, teaching unions, universities, employers and other stakeholders.

Delegates will assess the opportunities and challenges presented by D&T's designation as a 'foundation' subject, with a much less prescriptive Programme of Study, as well as the level of teaching time required to deliver the new Programme and whether it meets the needs of employers, colleges and universities.

Sessions also focus on wider issues in D&T including the quality of facilities available in both primary and secondary schools in England, the profile and CPD opportunities for D&T teachers and the role that industry can play in the delivery of D&T in schools."

(Westminster Education Forum, UK)

Fig.1 Chicago Middle School students participate in an invention school workshop led by James Dyson as the James Dyson Foundation begins its mission to encourage more American students to become future engineers and inventors, at the Sir Miles Davis Academy in Chicago, May 5, 2011 [http://momandmore.com/2011/05/james–dyson–foundation–just–launched.html].

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20132014 • Academy of Culinary Arts • Bel Reed • Bill Nicholl • CPDcurriculumcurriculum delivery • David Anderson • Department for Education • design and construction • design and technologyDesign and Technology AssociationDesign Council (UK) • DT • EBacceducation policyengineering and designEnglandEnglish Baccalaureate • foundation subject • Gina White • Government • implementation challenges • innovation and creativity • Institution of Mechanical Engineers • Isobel Pollock • IT • key stage • lateral thinking • lobbying • national curriculum • National Curriculum Seminar Series • North Baddesley Junior School • Ofsted • policy makersprimary schoolproblem-solving • programme of study • public policy • purposeful activities • Queen Elizabeths Grammar School • Richard Green • Royal Academy of Engineering • Sara Jayne Stanes • school leaders • secondary school • Susan Smith • synthetic thinkingtechnology educationUKUK GovernmentuniversitiesUniversity of CambridgeUniversity of Leeds • WEET • WEETF • WeF • Westminster Education Forum • Westminster Forum Projects • WFNF • WFP • WHF • Whitehall • WLPF • WMF

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2012

UK Government Digital Service Design Principles

"We're not designing for a screen, we're designing for people. We need to think hard about the context in which they're using our services. Are they in a library? Are they on a phone? Are they only really familiar with Facebook? Have they never used the web before?

We're designing for a very diverse group of users with very different technologies and needs. We need to make sure we've understood the technological and practical circumstances in which our services are used. Otherwise we risk designing beautiful services that aren't relevant to people's lives."

(UK Government Digital Service, Last updated 3 April 2012)

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2012 • 7 digital principles • API • building digital services • building for inclusion • consistencydesign methoddesign principlesdesign process • design with data • designing with data • desire paths • digital by default • digital firstdigital services • Directgov • do less • do the hard work to make it simple • GDS • Government Digital Service • Government Digital Service Design Principles • government needs • iterate • make things better • make things open • needs • official process • Open Government Licence • organising principle • prototypingprototyping and testing • real user needs • real users • start with needs • thinking about user needs • tried and tested • UKUK Government • understand context • understand user needs • uniformityuser needsvalue for moneywebsites

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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