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11 DECEMBER 2013

Divining a Digital Future - Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell

"Ubiquitous computing (or 'ubicomp') is the label for a 'third wave' of computing technologies. Following the eras of the mainframe computer and the desktop PC, ubicomp is characterized by small and powerful computing devices that are worn, carried, or embedded in the world around us. The ubicomp research agenda originated at Xerox PARC in the late 1980s; these days, some form of that vision is a reality for the millions of users of Internet–enabled phones, GPS devices, wireless networks, and 'smart' domestic appliances. In Divining a Digital Future, computer scientist Paul Dourish and cultural anthropologist Genevieve Bell explore the vision that has driven the ubiquitous computing research program and the contemporary practices that have emerged––both the motivating mythology and the everyday messiness of lived experience.

Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the authors' collaboration, the book takes seriously the need to understand ubicomp not only technically but also culturally, socially, politically, and economically. Dourish and Bell map the terrain of contemporary ubiquitous computing, in the research community and in daily life; explore dominant narratives in ubiquitous computing around such topics as infrastructure, mobility, privacy, and domesticity; and suggest directions for future investigation, particularly with respect to methodology and conceptual foundations."

Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell (2011). "Divining a Digital Future: Mess and Mythology in Ubiquitous Computing", MIT Press, May 2011, ISBN 978–0–262–01555–4.

TAGS

1980s2011computer sciencecomputingcontemporary practices • contemporary ubiquitous computing • cultural anthropologydaily lifedesktop computer • desktop PC • Divining a Digital Future (book) • domesticity • embedded in the world around us • everyday messiness • feature phone • future investigation • Genevieve Bell • GPS devices • infrastructureinterdisciplinary collaboration • internet-enabled phones • lived experiencemainframemobility • Paul Dourish • privacyresearch communityresearch methodology • small and powerful computing devices • smart domestic appliances • smart phones • third wave of computing technologies • ubicomp • ubicomp research • ubiquitous computing • ubiquitous computing research • wireless networkswornXerox PARC

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
19 APRIL 2012

Bryan Rieger: Rethinking the Mobile Web

"A few months back I submitted the smallest speck of an idea for a talk I was hoping to present at Over The Air in London. Having presented at Over The Air before I assumed my experiences this time around would more or less be the same – a chance to bounce a few of my recent thoughts off two–dozen or so UK developers.

To suggest that my assumption was wrong would in–fact be a massive understatement...

Three weeks later, the dust is still settling on the 90,000 140,000 presentation views, hundreds of tweets, and multitude of conversations, and I finally have time to provide the presentation with a much–needed introduction."

(Bryan Rieger)

Fig.1 "Rethinking the Mobile Web" by Yiibu

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TAGS

abstraction layer • accessible and inclusive mobile experiences • adaptive layoutAJAXAndroid OSApple • Bada • BlackBerry LtdBMW • Bryan Rieger • cHTML • CSS animations • CSS3device • DeviceAtlas • feature phone • featurephone • Fennec • Google (GOOG)HTMLHTML5Internet accessInternet ExploreriOSiPhone • Java ME • JavaME • market sharemedia queries • media types • MicroB • mobile browsermobile devices • mobile internet users • mobile operating systems • mobile web • most used devices • Nokia • Nokia Qt • Obigo • OBML • one web • Opera Binary Markup Language • OperaMini • optimised for mobile • Over The Air • Palm (OS) • phone • popular devices • presentation • real web • Rethinking the Mobile Web • Samsung • Skyfire • SlideSharesmartphoneSony Ericsson • SquirrelFish • standards support • SVG • Symbian • tabbed browsingtechnology • UK developers • w810i • WAP • WebKit • WebOS • William GibsonWindows Mobile • WML • WURFL • Yii

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JUNE 2006

ShotCodes: Browsing The Web On Camera Phones Through Offline URL Barcodes

"Hardly a week goes by without another company unveiling a new service (often based on barcode or RFID scanners) to facilitate the interaction between people and physical objects. Still, Dutch ShotCodes has managed to take a original shot at this market with a visual approach that will appeal to consumers because, well, visuals always appeal to consumers.

What is it? In their own words: 'Today, businesses cannot get people to use their mobile phones to browse the internet. This is because typing in domain names on a phone is a time–consuming and frustrating process. ShotCodes change all of this, radically. ShotCodes are offline web links. When captured by a mobile camera, ShotCodes instantly and effortlessly take users to any desired location on the internet on their phones. ShotCodes are easy to make and can be tied to any web address.'

Businesses can make their own ShotCodes and add them to existing print media or turn them into brand new tools for sales and customer interaction. End users can download free software (via sms/texting) and install it on their mobile phone. This software, which is available for major mobile phone brands and types, enables phones to act upon ShotCodes. For a demo, see: www.shotcode.com/data/movieformat.

ShotCodes is a new technology that allows users of camera phones to access Web pages on their phones without having to enter URLs into their handsets. The system works in a similar manner to barcodes: users snap circular barcodes; that are recognised by Java software on the host phone; that references (looks–up) a database of associated Web addresses. In this way the placement of printed ShotCode patterns in the concrete environment could provide a means for phone users to access associated online content.
Review list of compatible camera phones."
(Springwise, 2006)

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