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Which clippings match 'Mp3' keyword pg.1 of 2
01 JANUARY 2013

Neil Young Expands Pono Digital-to-Analogue Music Service

"Beginning next year [2013], Pono will release a line of portable players, a music–download service and digital–to–analog conversion technology intended to present songs as they first sound during studio recording sessions. In his book out this week, Waging Heavy Peace, Young writes that Pono will help unite record companies with cloud storage 'to save the sound of music.' As Flea raves to Rolling Stone, 'It's not like some vague thing that you need dogs' ears to hear. It's a drastic difference.'

Pono's preservation of the fuller, analog sound already has the ear of the Big Three record labels: Warner Music Group, Universal Music Group and Sony Music. WMG – home to artists including Muse, the Black Keys, Common and Jill Scott – has converted its library of 8,000 album titles to high–resolution, 192kHz/24–bit sound. It was a process completed prior to the company's partnership with Young's Pono project last year, said Craig Kallman, chairman and chief executive of Atlantic Records.'"

(Patrick Flanary, 27 September 2012, Rolling Stone)

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TAGS

2013 • 24-bit • Apple • Atlantic Records • audio • audio encoding • audio format • audio quality • Bonnaroo Festival • Buffalo Springfield • CDCD qualitycloud computing • cloud storage • compact disc • Craig Kallman • data compression • David Letterman • digital delivery • digital-to-analogue • Dolby • Doug Morris • experience • Flea • formatHawaiian • hearing • high-quality format • high-resolution • iTuneslistening experiencelistening to musicmedia devicesmedia formatmedia playermedia technology • Meridian • mp3 • Mumford and Sons • music • music distribution • music formatmusic player • music publishing • music recording • music service • My Morning Jacket • Neil Young • new service • perception • Pono • preservationradical innovationrecording artists • recording publishers • Red Hot Chili Peppers • righteous • Rolling Stone magazine • songs • Sony Musicsoundtechnologytechnology innovationtranscoding • UMG • Universal Music GroupWarner Music Group • WMG

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2012

Dara Ó Briain's Science Club: The Story of Music

"Special guest James May explores how music is inextricably linked to our emotions, materials scientist Mark Miodownik takes apart an electric guitar and neuroscientist Tali Sharot reports on the ground breaking research which treats Parkinson's Disease with rhythm. Plus, science journalist Alok Jha asks whether computers are ruining music."

(BBC Two, UK)

Fig.1 this animation is from Episode 6 of 6 of Dara Ó Briain's Science Club, Tuesday 30 Dec 2012 at 9pm on BBC Two, voiced by Dara Ó Briain, animated by 12Foot6, Published on YouTube on 19 Dec 2012 by BBC.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 SEPTEMBER 2009

How Firefox Is Pushing Open Video Onto the Web

"HTML 5, the emerging standard, is that content creators will be able to embed video and audio files on web pages with the same simplicity and ease as images and links.

The tools being used to power this behavior are the Ogg Theora and Vorbis codecs maintained by the non–profit Xiph.org. Currently, most video and audio on the web is presented using either Adobe's Flash Player, Microsoft's Silverlight or Apple's QuickTime. These are proprietary technologies, which means they come with various restrictions – licenses, patents and fees – attached.

Ogg, being open–source and patent–free, has no fees and very few use restrictions. Ogg has been around for a while. It was beaten out by MP3 in the Napster days as the audio format of choice, and has remained obscure ever since. It's also gotten a bad reputation because of poor quality and large file sizes compared to competing tools like h.264, which is used by both Quicktime and Flash, and will be used in the next release of Silverlight.

However, in the past year, the quality issues dogging Ogg have been largely solved thanks to the increased interest and involvement of developers who want to see support for open video on the web become a reality.

At a recent developer conference, Google showed off how it was building Ogg support directly into its Chrome browser to handle video playback without using any plug–ins. Mozilla's Jay Sullivan was then invited on stage, where he announced the next version of Firefox would also include built–in Ogg support, all part of a grand plan among browser makers to, in Sullivan's words, free video from 'plug–in prison.'"
(Michael Calore. Webmonkey, 18 June 2009)

TAGS

Adobe SystemsAppleChromeCODECconvergenceFirefox • Flash Player • Google IncH.264HTMLHTML5innovationinterdisciplinary • Jay Sullivan • MicrosoftMozillamp3Oggopen codecsopen sourceopen video • patent-free • QuickTimeSilverlightsolutiontechnologyTheoraVorbis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 DECEMBER 2008

Podcasting Heidegger's Being and Time

"One of the most important philosophical works of the twentieth century, Being and Time is both a systematization of the existential insights of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche and a radicalization of Husserl's phenomenological account of intentionality. What results is an original interpretation of the human condition leading to an account of the nature and limitations of philosophical and scientific theory. This account has important implications for all those disciplines that study human beings."
(Hubert Dreyfus, UC Berkeley)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 MAY 2007

Mp3 Player With Built-in FM Transmitter

The GH–KANA–GT series of mp3 players incorporates an FM transmitter so that you can host your own pirate radio station from inside the house, car, etc. The transmitter is enabled through replacing the player's headphones with a small antenna (plugged into headphone socket). The player that was created by the Japanese company Green House comes with 1GB of flash memory and support for both mp3 and wma digital music files.

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TAGS

antenna • broadcastFM • GH-KANA-GT • Green House • Japanlistening experiencemedia devicesmedia playermp3musicmusic player • pirate • player • radiotransmitter
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