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12 SEPTEMBER 2014

MoMA: Geometry of Motion 1920s/1970s

Geometry of Motion 1920s/1970s, March 19–July 28, 2008, The Yoshiko and Akio Morita Media Gallery, second floor, The Museum of Modern Art.

"This exhibition considers the transformation of the art object from static image to light projection within two distinct artistic lineages: the unconventional optical techniques and social analyses of the 1920s Neue Optik, or 'New Vision,' generation of artists, among them László Moholy–Nagy, Hans Richter, and Marcel Duchamp; and the situational aesthetics advanced by Gordon Matta–Clark, Robert Smithson, and Anthony McCall in the 1970s. Drawing attention to the conditions and complexities of perception–both within the framework of institutional display and in other surroundings–these artists have redefined the social potential of visual agency."

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1920s1970safterimage • Anthony McCall • art object • artistic lineage • durationEl Lissitzkyexhibitionexperimental cinema • fluid light projection • geometric abstraction • Gordon Matta-Clark • Hans Richter • Hollis Frampton • immaterialityintangible creationsJames Turrell • Klaus Biesenbach • Laszlo Moholy-Nagylight and space • light and space movement • light artlight projectionMarcel Duchamp • Maria Nordman • materialisationmotion artsmovementmovement-image • moving through space • Museum of Modern Art • Neue Optik (New Vision) • non-narrative • objecthood • objecthood and space • optical techniques • Paul Sharits • peripatetic • Richard Serra • Robert Irving (artist) • Robert Irwin • Robert Smithson • Roxana Marcoci • solid light films • static image • structural film • VernissageTV (VTV) • Viking Eggeling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 AUGUST 2013

Sonia Delaunay and the Art Simultané

"Together, the Delaunay [Sonia and Robert Delaunay] start a research on color that will be the essence, the content and the form but also the line of a new painting for a non–figurative art. Influenced by the Fauvism, she first presents works whose subjects and models are marked, slashed by the brutality of the shades. Creative perfection to aim at, the music offers to the artists, at this time, the philosophical assessment that will underlie their respective works. Powerful associations of rhythms and melodies, the compositions gather in the idea of 'simultaneous' what makes a new challenge for poets and painters. Sonia Delaunay then progressively develops a lyrical use and signification of the color, close from cubism, between rhythm and shade. Repetitions of forms, structures but also colors, her paintings take a direction all her artistic propositions will follow."

(Ozarts Etc, 3 December 2011)

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abstract artabstract artists • art and fashion • art simultanecar • Citroen • colour • colour and fashion • colour and light • colour blocking • contrasting colour • costume designcubist and abstract artcubist conceptionsdesign formalismdesignerfabricfashion design • Fauvism • female artistgeometric designsmodern artmodern womanmodernist aestheticsmodernist paintingmosaicmovement-imagemulti-disciplinary • multi-disciplinary artist • mural • non-figurative art • paintingpatchworkpatchwork quiltpatternrepetitionRobert DelaunaysimultaneismsimultaneitySonia Delaunaytextile design • textiles design • theatrical stage design • theatrical staging • Tissus Delaunay • vibrant colourvisual abstractionvisual artistvisual contrastvorticismwomen artistswomen in art and designzig-zag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2003

Deleuzian Memory of Sans Soleil

"Deleuze's notion of time–image cinema describes a revolutionary and political cinema. To understand time–image cinema, we must contrast it with movement–image cinema, 'in which frame follows frame according to necessities of action, subordinating time to movement.'1 Clearly, Sans Soleil is nothing like movement–image cinema. The film has no action or plot that could subordinate time; instead, Marker claims that the only qualification these images have for being included in the film is that they quicken the heart. These images span many different time periods from World War II to the present, and a scene is just as likely to cut to West Africa or San Francisco as it is to cut to a different angle within the same room. In the film, an unnamed and unseen narrator reads the fictitious letters of Sandor Krasna, a traveling cameraman (a thinly–veiled alter–ego for Marker)."

(B.C. Holmes)

TAGS

16mm • Alexandra Stewart • Anne-Marie L Hote • Antoine Bonfanti • Arielle Dombasle • authorial intrusion • Bajazet (1672) • Beaulieu (camera) • Catherine Adda • Charlotte Kerr • Chris Markercinema • Daniele Tessier • Eugenio Bentivoglio • fictitiousness • Florence Delay • Gilles Deleuze • global histories • Guinea-Bissau • Haroun Tazieff • Hayao Yamaneko • human memory • IcelandJames StewartJapan • Jean Racine • Jean-Michel Humeau • Judy Burton • Kasabian (band) • Kim NovakLa Jeteeletters • Madeleine Elster • Mario Marret • meditation • Modest Mussorgsky • movement-imagenarrationnarratorParis • Paul Bertault • personal histories • Pierre Camus • Riyoko Ikeda • San Francisco • Sana Na N hada • Sandor KrasnaSans Soleil (1983) • Spectron video synthesizer • Stalker (1979)stock footageThomas Stearns Eliottime-imagetravelogueVertigo (1958)video synthesizerWorld War II
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