Not Signed-In
Which clippings match '2001' keyword pg.1 of 9
25 NOVEMBER 2014

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

"The year is 1974, and Arthur C. Clarke is standing inside one of those cavernous computer centers that held the massive machines of the day. ...

He doesn't call it the internet. But he says that even before the dawn of the twenty–first century, the boy's home will include a computer console – something much smaller than those massive machines humming in the background in 1974 – that provides 'all the information he needs for his everyday life: his bank statements, his theater reservations, all the information you need over the course of living in a complex modern society.' ...

'They will make it possible to live really anywhere we like. Any businessman, any executive, could live almost anywhere on Earth and still do his business through a device like this,' he says. 'It means we won't be stuck in cities. We'll live out in the country or wherever we please and still carry on complete interactions with other human beings as well as computers.' Our cities haven't exactly shrunk. But we're certainly able to connect with each other from wherever we might be."

(Cade Metz , March 2013, Wired.com)

1

TAGS

19742001ABC TV (Australia) • Arthur C Clarke • Australian Broadcasting Corporation • computer centre • computer console • connected worldconnectivity • every household • future forecastingfuturisthome computer • household computer • Internetpredicting the futurepunch cards • punch-card reader • science fiction writer • tape drives • translocationWired (magazine)world connectivity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2014

The Visitor: Living by Numbers (2001)

Luc Courchesne (2001). 'The Visitor : Living by Numbers' immersive experience (reflexive Panoscope) work premièred at Art Gallery of New South Wales (Sydney, Australia), August 2001.

"Interactive video panorama for computer with microphone and hemispheric projection system (Panoscope 360). Created with support from the Daniel Langlois Foundation for Art, Science and Technology, the International Academy for Media Arts and Sciences, the Canada Council for the Arts, Université de Montréal and the Société des arts technologiques (SAT). The original version is in English.

General description: The Visitor: Living by Numbers is inspired by Pier-Paolo Pasolini's 1969 film Theorema and by a dream Courchesne's daughter had when she was 10 years old. In the installation, visitors are planted somewhere in the Japanese countryside. From there they will try to make a life for themselves by saying any number between one and twelve to indicate the direction they want to go or to show interest in people and what they have to say. Exploring the territory, happening upon and entering a shelter, meeting and dealing with the inhabitants and gaining status within the group will define a visitor's experience. Leaving the place and the inhabitants to themselves (as in Pasolini's film) or being forced to escape after an earthquake (as in his daughter's dream) will further characterize the visitor's experience.

The experience starts in daytime, in the middle of rice fields just north of Ogaki-City in central Japan (Gifu Prefecture). In the inner garden of a low building, visitors will happen upon a woman preparing tea. This first encounter may lead to an invitation to diner where a mixed group of people (6) prepare and share a Japanese style stew (nabet). The diner is endless but conversations with dining partners may bring a visitor to spare moments in the intimacy of one's room where he or she is offered the host's mind and thoughts on different topics growing increasingly personal. In the process, a visitor builds a position in the group that either will have him invited to take more place among the group, or gradually ignored and abandoned.

Meanwhile, night has come and the risk of an unforgiving event in this earthquake prone area is more tangible. If such a thing was to happen, destroying the shelter and forcing everyone out, visitors would, depending on their status, be left behind or invited to join in the chaotic and confuse quest for a new place where every aspect of this group’s life will resume in the same way as if nothing had happened."

1
2

TAGS

2001 • Art Gallery of New South Wales Sydney • art installationAustraliaimmersive aesthetic experienceimmersive experienceinteractive artworkintimate interactionsintimate interfaces • Japanese countryside • Luc CourchesneSydney

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 SEPTEMBER 2014

Human Flesh Search (HFS)

"This article studies an interesting Internet phenomenon known as Human Flesh Search which illustrates the far-reaching impacts of the Internet that is less documented. Due to its huge threat on individual privacy, human flesh search has introduced huge controversy and invited heated debate in China. This paper reviews its growth, explores the impetuses, identifies the distinctions from the alternative search engines, and summarizes the benefits and drawbacks. Furthermore, the paper develops a systematic review of the prior literature in human flesh search by surveying major sources such as academic journals, national and international conferences, and public and private databases. Finally, the paper identifies five research gaps in the literature and offers an initial interpretation and analysis of these remaining research issues. Human flesh search is still growing and the current study helps the computing field learn the past and present of this emerging phenomenon and properly manage its future development."

(Rui Chen and Sushil Sharma, 2011)

Rui Chen and Sushil Sharma (2011). Journal of Information Privacy and Security, Volume 7, Issue 1, 2011, pages 50-71.

1

TAGS

20012011abuse • alternative search engines • breaching anonymity • breaching confidentiality • broadcasting personally identifiable information • committing an offense • controversycrowdsourcingcultural codescultural normscyber vigilantismcyberbullying • cyberposse • cyberpsychologydeath threats • denial-of-service attack • digilantism • distributed researching • DoS attack • doxing • doxxing • emerging phenomenon • etiquette • exposing corruption • exposing fraud • falsehoodgossipharassment • HFSE • Human Flesh Search (HFS) • human flesh search engine • identifying people • illegal access • individual privacy • information about specific individuals • information about specific organisations • information accuracy • information privacyinformation reliabilityinformation sharing • Internet phenomenon • Internet-based practice • massive human collaboration • monitoring • netizen • normsonline activismpanopticonpeople-powered searchPeoples Republic of Chinapublic humiliationpublic shamingpunishment • research gaps • research issues • revealing classified informationrevealing private informationRui Chensearch engines • social breach online • social controlsocial normssurveillanceSushil Sharmasystematic review • unofficial information • vigilante reactions • vigilantismviolation • vitrio

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JULY 2014

Consuming to Achieve Affective Goals

"The term affective consumption refers to the use of a good to achieve an affective goal of either entering a positively valenced affective state, or leaving a negatively valenced one. Affective goals may be achieved using either an instant gratification strategy or a delayed gratification strategy."

(W. Edward Roth)

W. Edward Roth (2001) ,"Consuming to Achieve Affective Goals: a Framework For Analysis With Application", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, eds. Mary C. Gilly and Joan Meyers-Levy, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 217.

1

TAGS

2001affective consumptionaffective goal achievement • affective goals • consumer research • consumingconsumption practicesconsumption spectacle • health and fitness • health and fitness centre • instant gratification • instant gratification strategy • W Edward Roth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 NOVEMBER 2013

Free Range: London's Annual Art and Design Exhibition

"Free Range is an Old Truman Brewery special project set up by Tamsin O'Hanlon to provide new creative graduates with the opportunity to showcase their work on an international level. Since its inception in 2001, Free Range has become the number one platform and launch pad for the next crop of creatives to showcase their work to both public and industry. Attracting visitor numbers to rival the largest art events, the annual Free Range exhibitions present the work of thousands of art, design students in several distinct categories including: fashion, art, graphics, photography and interior design."

1

2

TAGS

2001annual eventart and design graduate exhibitionart and design showBrick Lane Londondesign exhibitiondesign graduatedesign showcasedesign studentdesign talent • fashion exhibition • Free Range (exhibition) • graduate exhibitiongraduate showsgraduate students • graphic design exhibition • interior design exhibition • LondonLondon graduate showsnew creative graduatesOld Truman Breweryphotography exhibitionstudent exhibitionstudent showcase • Tamsin OHanlon • visual art exhibition

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.