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Which clippings match 'Student Achievement' keyword pg.1 of 2
09 OCTOBER 2015

Is competition good for learning? Exploring ipsative assessment as an alternative

"Ipsative assessment is a powerful and under-used approach that provokes a radical rethink of the purposes and methods of assessment. Ipsative assessment means making comparisons with a learner's previous work to mark progress and enable learners from all backgrounds to achieve a personal best. The seminar presents a case for partially replacing competitive assessment with ipsative assessment in a dual systems approach, and it explores the possibilities and the challenges using research evidence and examples from case studies in the recently published book Ipsative Assessment: Motivation through marking progress by Gwyneth Hughes."

(Gwyneth Hughes, 07 October 2014)

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TAGS

2014 • all learners can succeed • Amanda West • assessment for learningassessment techniques • attainment • Carol Dweckcomparison with previous performance • competition and performativity • competitive assessment • conference presentation • Diane Reay • Dylan Wiliam • George Madaus • grading against external standards • Graham GibbsGwyneth Hughesimprovement against past performance • instrumental conditioning • instrumental learning • ipsative assessment • learning and attainment • learning and development • learning and teaching • learning not outcomes • learning pathways • learning process • marking progress • marks and performance • measuring individual performance • Miriam David • motivational needsmotivational theory • Patricia Broadfoot • Paul Black • performance metricsperformativitypersonal achievementpersonal bestpersonal improvementRichard Sennettself-esteem • self-referential assessment • Stephen Ball • student achievement • Sue Bloxham • unequal access

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JULY 2015

Assessment Careers: enhancing learning pathways

"Assessment is often viewed as a series of one-off events. This means that learners do not always benefit from feedback, they lack a sense of progress and self-reliance is not encouraged. This project will reconceptualise assessment from the perspective of an assessment career and use this to transform our institution's assessment processes. Like a working career, an assessment career develops through a series of related events that join up to give a coherent and progressive pathway that is self-directed."

(Gwyneth Hughes, Research Portal, Institute of Education, University of London)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JULY 2015

Longitudinal and ipsative assessment

"Ipsative assessment and feedback (assessment and feedback based on comparison with previous performance) describes an approach to assessment that focuses on improvement against past performance rather than grading against set criteria. Commonly used in performance-related disciplines such as music or sport, ipsative assessment enables credit to be given for improvement regardless of achievement (Hughes, Okumoto and Crawford, 2010). Ipsative feedback in turn makes comments on how far the student has travelled from a previous level of performance, which is both more motivational for non-traditional learners and more likely to promote self-regulation in all students.

In a wide range of assessment scenarios, from professional practice (medicine for example) to distance learning, ipsative assessment and feedback could reduce the need for testing and retesting of skills. Instead of 'learning for the test', a process of continuous monitoring and self-regulation could make the acquisition of professional or vocational competences more authentic, rewarding and genuine, and enable tutors to devote more time and effort to mentoring."

(Marianne Sheppard and Ros Smith, http://jiscdesignstudio.pbworks.com)

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TAGS

assessment for learning • assessment scenarios • assessment techniquescomparison with previous performancecontinuous monitoring • continuous personal development • diagnostic assessment • Gwyneth Hugheshow far the student has travelledimprovement against past performanceipsative assessment • ipsative assessment and feedback • ipsative feedback • JISC Design Studio • Kaori Okumoto • knowledge and skills acquisition • learning and successlearning engagement • learning for the test • level of performance • Likert scale • longitudinal learning datamaking processmeasuring individual performancemeasuring instrument • Megan Crawford • motivational needs • non-traditional learners • performance-related disciplines • personal achievementpersonal bestpersonal improvement • professional competences • professional practicequality of achievementrunning score • self-regulation • student achievementstudent performance • vocational competences

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2014

NZ Virtual Professional Learning and Development programme

"The Virtual Professional Learning Development programme (VPLD) provides professional learning through an online Community of Practice (CoP). The VPLD offers flexibility of choice, time and approach, and is designed to fit in with what you are already doing as teachers and/or leaders.

Participants develop their own learning goals around projects that interest them, within a learning inquiry process. The aims are to raise participants' professional knowledge and skills, while also accelerating students' achievement of learning outcomes.

A fundamental aspect of participating in the VPLD is engagement in the VPLD online Community of Practice (CoP). The CoP offers a safe environment in which educators can discuss and challenge alternative points of view about pedagogy and practice, across disciplines and sectors."

(New Zealand Ministry of Education)

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alternative points of view • Aotearoa New Zealandcommunity of practiceCoP • CORE Education • disciplinarity sectors • e-learningeducators • enquiry process • Hazel Owen • learning goalslearning outcomes • New Zealand Ministry of Education • pedagogy • personalising professional learning virtually • professional development • professional knowledge and skills • professional learning • student achievement • Te Kete Ipurangi • Te Tahuhu o te Matauranga • teachingteaching practice • Virtual PLD programme • Virtual Professional Learning Development programme (VPLD) • VPLD

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MARCH 2012

Integrating the process of design thinking into the classroom

"When you think of design thinking, think of innovative outcomes – like the iPod, or that perfect peeler that both cuts well and has an amazing grip, or the Aravind Eye Care system that allows for thousands of underresourced families in India to address cataract issues.

Pioneers of design thinking called it the process of 'a practical, creative resolution of problems or issues that looks for an improved future result' (Simon, 1969). Recently, educational researchers have been asking what happens when educators integrate the process of design thinking into the classroom. Their findings include numerous examples of enhanced student learning."

(Mount Vernon Institute for Innovation, Mount Vernon Presbyterian School, Atlanta)

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TAGS

21st centurybetter-functioning productschildrenclassroomcollaborationcomplexity • constructivist theories of learning • convergent thinking • creative resolution of problems • creativitycreativity skillscritical thinking • D.E.E.P. • design approach • design innovationdesign responsibilitydesign thinking • design thinking approach • design thinking in classroomdesign-based learningdesign-oriented thinking • deviate from facts • Discover Empathise Experiment Produce • divergent thinkingeducationeducatoreffective communication • enhanced student learning • experimentation • exploring possibilities • hands on • Herbert Simon • innovative outcomes • K-4 • know-how • learning as a social activity • multidisciplinary teams • MVPS • pedagogyproblem-oriented thinkingproblem-solvingproduct design • science concepts • science lab • scripted approach to enquiry • socio-technological dimensionssolving problemsspeculative designstudent achievementteaching science • traditional learning frameworks

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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