Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Morality' keyword pg.1 of 3
17 SEPTEMBER 2017

The Macedonian digital workers behind the US fake news industry

"In the final weeks of the US presidential election, Veles attained a weird infamy in the most powerful nation on earth; stories in The Guardian and on BuzzFeed revealed that the Macedonian town of 55,000 was the registered home of at least 100 pro-Trump websites, many of them filled with sensationalist, utterly fake news. (The imminent criminal indictment of Hillary Clinton was a popular theme; another was the pope's approval of Trump.) The sites' ample traffic was rewarded handsomely by automated advertising engines, like Google's AdSense. An article in The New Yorker described how President Barack Obama himself spent a day in the final week of the campaign talking 'almost obsessively' about Veles and its 'digital gold rush.'"

(Samanth Subramanian, 15 February 2017, Wired)

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TAGS

20172020advertising • American news sites • baseless claimsCNN • consumerist boom • deceitfulnessdeceptiondestabilised perception • digital gold rush • digital work • digital worker • Donald Trumpfake news • fake news industry • fake news websites • fakery • false claims • false information • false news • false statementsfalsehoodfalsificationfalsify realityfraud • fraudulent behaviour • gullibilityinfamyliesMacedonia • manipulating information • manipulative contrivances • misinformationmistruthsmoralitynews mediapost-truth politicspro-Trump mediasensationalism • sensationalist stories • Titov Veles • true or false • Trump Veles • US election • US election campaign • Veles • viral news media • Yugoslavia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 FEBRUARY 2016

Retailer uses drones to playfully respond to social media censorship

"clothing retail store BUYMA recently produced a creative commercial that strictly wants you to buy their clothes. Since Japanese TV programs are legally obligated to cover sensitive body parts, BUYMA uses drones to fully censor two professional belly [sic] dancers while they dance their routine naked."

[This Buyma ad which was created for television clearly plays with concepts around censorship - both in the context of Japanese broadcast media and perhaps more importantly in the context of social media where it will likely have most traction. In doing so the ad playfully references contemporary restrictions in place on sites such as Facebook.]

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2015ballet • Buyma (retailer) • censorshipcheekyclassical balletclothing retailercomedy of mannerscultural conventionsdancedroneetiquette • flying drone • high-technology • hoverJapan • Japanese online retailer • morality • naked ballet dancing • naughty • nude man • nude women • nudity • obscenity • obscuring nudity • online retailer • playful provocation • playfulnesspolite societyquadcoptersexual taboo • social media censorship • social shopping service • tabootv adtv advertveiledviral advisual gag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2014

The Phantom of Liberty: humorous critique of bourgeois conventions

"Luis Buñuel's The Phantom of Liberty was quickly dismissed upon its release in 1974. Not only did it have to contend with the lingering success of 1972's similarly themed but significantly less abstract The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, but it was quickly followed by the dreamlike, bi–polar romantic entanglement of the director's last film, That Obscure Object of Desire. Like Discreet Charm, the plot–free Phantom of Liberty is a patchwork of comedic sketches and sight gags through which Buñuel ravages a complacent European culture and the various sexual hang–ups and historical and cultural disconnects of its inhabitants. This heady, almost off–putting masterwork isn't particularly easy to decipher (maybe we aren't meant to), which is why it's best to approach it as a literal comedy of manners.

Films structured around daisy chains of dysfunction are a dime a dozen; most, though, are as tiresomely long–winded as they are content with their own strained circularity. This isn't the case with Phantom of Liberty, which begins with a shot of Goya's 1808 masterpiece 'The Third of May.' The painting depicts Napoleon's army executing a group of faceless Spaniards, and via a reenactment of this struggle, Buñuel depicts how one of Napoleon's captains tries to defile the monument of Doña Elvira only to be smacked on the head by the moving arm of the statue of the woman's husband. (He later intends to sleep with the woman's corpse, and when he opens her coffin, he's amazed by how her beauty has been preserved.) It's the first of many sight gags in the film, each and every one as startling as they are perversely funny. All these moments are possessed by a sense of shocked wonderment and discovery, and they all more or less evoke fragile pasts and characters trying to reconcile their historical detachments."

(Ed Gonzalez, 13 September 2003, Slant Magazine)

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1974absurd situationsabsurdist humourabsurdity • Adolfo Celi • Adriana Asti • Anne-Marie Deschott • apparition • Arch de Triomphe • archaic rules • Bernard Verley • black humour • bourgeois • bourgeoise societycancer • chance encounter • cigarettes • Claude Pieplu • coffin • comedic sketches • comedycomedy of mannerscorpsecritiquecultural conventionscultural pastdaughterdining practicesdinner tabledisappearancedoctor • Dona Elvira • eatingepisodic structureetiquetteEuropean cinema • European culture • faith • Francois Maistre • girl • Goya • Helene Perdriere • hotel • housemaid • humour • impulses • internal logic • intrusion • Jean Rochefort • Jean-Claude Brialy • Julien Bertheau • Le Fantome de la Liberte (1974) • Luis Bunuel • mailman • masterwork • Michael Lonsdale • Michel Piccoli • Milena Vukotic • Monica Vitti • Montparnasse • morality • nanny • narrative preconceptions • obscene • ostrich • parodypatchwork • Paul Frankeur • phallicphallic symbol • Philippe Brigaud • Pierre Maguelon • policepolite societypostcard • postman • psychoanalysisritual • rooster • rulesschool • schoolchildren • Serge Silberman • sexual hang-ups • sexual taboo • sight gag • sketch comedy • sniper • social behavioursocial conventionsSpanish filmsubconscioussurrealist cinemasurrealist filmmakertaboo • That Obscure Object of Desire (1977) • The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972) • The Phantom of Liberty (1974) • The Third of May (1808) • toilettriptych • vanished • visual gagzoo

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MAY 2014

Gabriel Tarde: The Laws of Imitation

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1903adaptation • beliefs and desires • biological conflict • changing environmentCharles Darwin • civic opinion • collective behaviour • creative associations • cultural innovations • diffusion of innovations • environmentally adaptive inventions • evolution of the species • extralogical factors • extralogical social factors • Francis GaltonGabriel Tarde • human innovation • imitation • intermental activity • international political • inventioninventiveness • mass communications • mass society theory • microsociologymorality • opposing ideas • opposing motivations • opposition • paths of imitation • pattern of activity • physical conflict • prestige hierarchy structures • psychological conflict • public opinion research • rational aspects of a culture • rational development • receptivity • social adjustments • social conflict • social consequencessocial interactionsocial invention • social patterns • social psychology • social system • social variables • societal change • sociologytechnical innovation • The Laws of Imitation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JUNE 2013

The Stanford Prison Experiment

"Welcome to the Stanford Prison Experiment web site, which features an extensive slide show and information about this classic psychology experiment, including parallels with the abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib. What happens when you put good people in an evil place? Does humanity win over evil, or does evil triumph? These are some of the questions we posed in this dramatic simulation of prison life conducted in the summer of 1971 at Stanford University.

How we went about testing these questions and what we found may astound you. Our planned two–week investigation into the psychology of prison life had to be ended prematurely after only six days because of what the situation was doing to the college students who participated. In only a few days, our guards became sadistic and our prisoners became depressed and showed signs of extreme stress. Please join me on a slide tour describing this experiment and uncovering what it tells us about the nature of human nature."

(Philip G. Zimbardo)

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1971Abu Ghraib Prisonauthoritybrutalitycommand responsibility • Cool Hand Luke (1967) • dehumanisationdeindividuationdignitydisciplineethics • guard • guilthuman experimentationhuman naturehuman subjectshuman willhumiliationimprisonmentmoral dignitymoral dilemmamoralitynature of morality • Philip Zimbardo • powerpower corruptsprisonprisonerpsychology • research experiment • research study • self-controlsimulation studysocial experimentssocial responsibility • Stanford Prison Experiment • suffering injustice

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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