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Which clippings match 'Montage' keyword pg.1 of 2
28 JANUARY 2014

Montage theory: the Battleship Potemkin Odessa Steps scene

"Montage––juxtaposing images by editing––is unique to film (and now video). During the 1920s, the pioneering Russian film directors and theorists Sergei Eisenstein and Dziga Vertov demonstrated the technical, aesthetic, and ideological potentials of montage. The 'new media' theorist Lev Manovich has pointed out how much these experiments of the 1920s underlie the aesthetics of contemporary video.

Eisenstein believed that film montage could create ideas or have an impact beyond the individual images. Two or more images edited together create a 'tertium quid' (third thing) that makes the whole greater than the sum of its individual parts.

Eisenstein's greatest demonstration of the power of montage comes in the 'Odessa Steps' sequence of his 1925 film Battleship Potemkin. On the simplest level, montage allows Eisenstein to manipulate the audience's perception of time by stretching out the crowd's flight down the steps for seven minutes, several times longer than it would take in real time"

(Glen Johnson)

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TAGS

1920s1925 • audience perception • Battleship Potemkin (1925)cinematic visual languagecontinuity editing • cross cutting • crowdDziga Vertovediting technique • film aesthetics • film montage • film sequence • ideological potential • juxtapositionLev Manovichmontagemontage theory • narrative design • Odessa Steps • parallel action • parallel cut • parallel editing • parallel textsequence designSergei Eisensteinshot reverse shotstaircasestairwaysteps • tertium quid • third thing • whole is greater than the sum of the parts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2013

The Kuleshov Effect

"Technique which demonstrates the inherent power of montage as a primary tool in the manipulation of the viewer's perception. According to Kuleshov, cinema consists of fragments and it is their combination rather than their content that is essential in evoking and triggering different emotions. His original experiment consists of using the same shot of the character's face, frozen in a neutral emotion while editing it next to different objects he appears to be glancing at: a girl in a coffin, a bowl of soup, and a woman. The audience interpreted the three situations as expressions of sadness, hunger and lust."

(Laura Minca)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 OCTOBER 2011

Mise-en-scene, Montage, and the Unique Language of Film

"Mise–en–scène refers to the visual design of a film. A narrative film's visual elements can include lighting, set décor, costume design, props, blocking, spatial relationships, scene composition – Mise–en–scène is how these visual elements work together to tell the story. Every visual element designed for narrative film is considered mise–en–scène. Even non–narrative films, such as documentaries, can be said to have a certain degree of mise–en–scène. This arrangement and design expresses aspects of the characters, themes, and story that are necessarily in dialogue."

(Michael McVey, Skiffleboom.com)

Fig.1 James McTeigue (2006). "V for Vendetta"

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TAGS

ocking • characterscostume designdecor • designed • dialoguefilm • film grammar • film languagelightingmise-en-scenemontage • narrative film • props • scene compositionset decorspatial relationshipsstory • tell the story • themesvisual designvisual elements

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MAY 2010

We Feel Fine is an exploration of human emotion on a global scale

"Since August 2005, We Feel Fine has been harvesting human feelings from a large number of weblogs. Every few minutes, the system searches the world's newly posted blog entries for occurrences of the phrases 'I feel' and 'I am feeling'. When it finds such a phrase, it records the full sentence, up to the period, and identifies the 'feeling' expressed in that sentence (e.g. sad, happy, depressed, etc.). Because blogs are structured in largely standard ways, the age, gender, and geographical location of the author can often be extracted and saved along with the sentence, as can the local weather conditions at the time the sentence was written. All of this information is saved.

The result is a database of several million human feelings, increasing by 15,000 – 20,000 new feelings per day. Using a series of playful interfaces, the feelings can be searched and sorted across a number of demographic slices, offering responses to specific questions like: do Europeans feel sad more often than Americans? Do women feel fat more often than men? Does rainy weather affect how we feel? What are the most representative feelings of female New Yorkers in their 20s? What do people feel right now in Baghdad? What were people feeling on Valentine's Day? Which are the happiest cities in the world? The saddest? And so on.

The interface to this data is a self–organizing particle system, where each particle represents a single feeling posted by a single individual. The particles' properties–color, size, shape, opacity–indicate the nature of the feeling inside, and any particle can be clicked to reveal the full sentence or photograph it contains. The particles careen wildly around the screen until asked to self–organize along any number of axes, expressing various pictures of human emotion. We Feel Fine paints these pictures in six formal movements titled: Madness, Murmurs, Montage, Mobs, Metrics, and Mounds.

At its core, We Feel Fine is an artwork authored by everyone. It will grow and change as we grow and change, reflecting what's on our blogs, what's in our hearts, what's in our minds. We hope it makes the world seem a little smaller, and we hope it helps people see beauty in the everyday ups and downs of life."

(Jonathan Harris & Sep Kamvar, May 2006)

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TAGS

2005artworkbig data • blog entries • culturedatadata collection and analysisdata scrapingdatabase • demographic • depressed • everydayfeelinggeographical locationgraphic representation • happy • human emotion • human feelingsI am feeling • I feel • information aestheticsinformation graphicsinteraction designinteractiveinterfaceJonathan Harrismadnessmedia artmetrics • mobs • montage • mounds • murmurs • opinion miningparticle systemspatternpatterns of human behaviourphrase • sad • scrapesentiment analysisSep Kamvarvisual depictionvisualisation • We Feel Fine • weblog

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 NOVEMBER 2009

Tension & Release: What are the functions of rhythm in film?

"All of the tools, the choreographic processes, and the editor's sources of intuitive knowledge about editing a film's rhythm are used by editors in service of fulfilling rhythm's purposes in film. The question in this chapter is: What are the functions of rhythm in film? The following discussion suggests that the functions of rhythm are to create cycles of tension and release and to synchronize the spectator's physical, emotional, and cognitive fluctuations with the rhythms of the film."

(Karen Pearlman, 05 March 2008, The Art of the Guillotine)

Karen Pearlman, 2009. 'Cutting Rhythms: Shaping the Film Edit'. Focal Press.

Fig.1 Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho shower scene; Fig.2 CHAPTER 3: Timing, Pacing, and Trajectory Phrasing; Fig.3 CHAPTER 4: Tension, Release, and Synchronization; Fig.4. A podcast of Karen Pearlman.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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