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Which clippings match 'MoMA' keyword pg.1 of 3
28 DECEMBER 2012

Influential American experimental cinema: Meshes of the Afternoon

"Meshes of the Afternoon is one of the most influential works in American experimental cinema. A non–narrative work, it has been identified as a key example of the 'trance film,' in which a protagonist appears in a dreamlike state, and where the camera conveys his or her subjective focus. The central figure in Meshes of the Afternoon, played by Deren, is attuned to her unconscious mind and caught in a web of dream events that spill over into reality. Symbolic objects, such as a key and a knife, recur throughout the film; events are open–ended and interrupted. Deren explained that she wanted 'to put on film the feeling which a human being experiences about an incident, rather than to record the incident accurately.'

Made by Deren with her husband, cinematographer Alexander Hammid, Meshes of the Afternoon established the independent avant–garde movement in film in the United States, which is known as the New American Cinema. It directly inspired early works by Kenneth Anger, Stan Brakhage, and other major experimental filmmakers. Beautifully shot by Hammid, a leading documentary filmmaker and cameraman in Europe (where he used the surname Hackenschmied) before he moved to New York, the film makes new and startling use of such standard cinematic devices as montage editing and matte shots. Through her extensive writings, lectures, and films, Deren became the preeminent voice of avant–garde cinema in the 1940s and the early 1950s."

(MoMA, 2004)

The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA Highlights, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, revised 2004, originally published 1999.

Maya Deren (1943). "Meshes of the Afternoon", 16mm film, black and white, silent, 14 min. Acquired from the Artist.

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16mm1943 • Alexander Hackenschmied • Alexander Hammid • American cinemaavant-garde cinemablack and whiteBolexcinemacinematic devicescloakdeathdream • dream world • dreamlike qualityeditingexperimental cinemaexperimental film • experimental filmmaker • filmfilm pioneerfilmmakerflowerFreudianindependent cinemainfluential directorinfluential worksKenneth Angerkeyknife • matte • Maya Deren • Meshes of the Afternoon • mirrorMoMA • New American Cinema • non-narrativeopen-endedpersonal filmrecurring ideasrepetitionrhythmscreen-mediated virtual spaceseminalsilent filmstaircaseStan Brakhagesurrealist cinemasymbolic meaningsymbolism • Teiji Ito • tranceunconscious desires • unconscious meaning • women in filmwomen in historywordless

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2012

The Feral Diagram: Graffiti and Street Art 2011

"This diagram was meant as a challenge to the prevailing art world hegemony. It was created to prove the argument that graffiti and street art were already at the center of the art world whether they were officially recognized or not.

Utilizing the same graphic vocabulary as Alfred H. Barr, Jr (the first director of MoMA for the cover of the catalog for Cubist and Abstract Art exhibition in 1937) to create an impression of authority equivalent to his diagram. The Feral Diagram picks up chronologically where Barr left off, thereby subverting and redirecting the officially recognized historical trajectory.

Six years after the first draft of this diagram, the acknowledgement of graffiti and street art as important movements within the fine art community, if not the most important movements at the beginning of the new millenium, has come to light with major museum retrospectives, a never ending stream of books on the subject, websites, products, etc."

(Daniel Feral, 2011, Flickr)

Fig.1 revised "Feral Diagram 2.0" version.

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19372011 • Alfred Barr • art movementauthorised voicechartcritiquecubist and abstract art • Daniel Feral • diagram • Feral Diagram 2.0 • Futurism 2.0 • graffitigraffiti art • graphic vocabulary • hegemony • historical imaginings • historical trajectory • information graphicsMoMANYC • Pantheon Projects Group • posterpowerstreet art • The Feral Diagram • visual artvisual communicationvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2012

e-flux: an international visual art network

"Established in January 1999 in New York, e–flux is an international network which reaches more than 90,000 visual art professionals on a daily basis through its website, e–mail list and special projects. Its news digest – e–flux announcements – distributes information on some of the world's most important contemporary art exhibitions, publications and symposia.

The daily digest is put together in cooperation with nearly two thousand leading international museums, art centers, foundations, galleries, biennials and art journals. Our focused and selective approach to the information we choose to distribute has been rewarded by an exceptionally high degree of attention and responsiveness from our readers."

(e–flux)

Fig.1 "Pussy Riot" performing on top of Lobnoye Mesto stone platform on Red Square in Moscow. Photograph: Anna Artemeva/AFP/Getty Images.
Fig.2 Sally Mann "Candy Cigarette" 1989. Immediate Family. New York: Aperture, 1992.

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1999announcementsart • art biennials • art centresart exhibition • art foundations • art galleriesart gallery • art journals • Castello di Rivoli Museo dArte Contemporanea • contemporary artcontemporary art exhibitionscontemporary art publicationscontemporary art symposiadaily digeste-fluxe-mail list • Generali Foundation • Guggenheiminstitutions • international museums • international network • Moderna Museet • MoMAmuseum • Museum Ludwig • Museum of Modern ArtNew Yorknews digestpractitioners • publications • special projectsTateTate Modernvisual art professionalsWhitney Museum

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 APRIL 2011

Art Project: take a virtual (Google) tour of famous art museums

"Simply select a museum from the homepage and then either choose 'Explore the museum' or 'View Artwork'. Once you are in the main site use the drop–down menus or the side info bar to navigate between artworks and museums. Finally create and share your own collections online."

(Google Art Project, 2011)

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2011 • Alte Nationalgalerie • Amsterdam • App Engine • art • Art Project (Google) • artistsartworkBerlincollectiondetailFlorenceFrance • Freer Gallery of Art • Frick Collection • gallery • Gemaldegalerie • Google Art Project • Google IncGoogle Street Viewhigh resolutionintegrationLondonMadridmappingmasterpieceMetropolitan Museum of ArtMoMAMoscowmultimedia • Museo Reina Sofia • Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza • museum • Museum Kampa • National GallerynavigationNew YorkNew York CityobjectsPalace of Versailles • Picasa • Prague • resolution • RijksmuseumsearchSt. Petersburg • State Hermitage Museum • State Tretyakov Gallery • Tate Britaintechnologytool • Uffizi Gallery • Van Gogh Museum • Versailles • viewvirtual heritagevirtual tourvisual depictionvisualisationWashington DCweb application • zoom

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MARCH 2010

Hans Richter: Rhytmus 21

"Richter and Eggeling were among the first creators of abstract film. Although the films themselves were produced in Berlin, the works were grounded in Zurich Dada's experiments with abstraction. The artists originally experimented with painting on scrolls before turning to animated film. Eggeling directly transposed his scroll drawings to film to create "cinematic drawings"; Richter more fully exploited the new medium, abandoning his drawings altogether and filming paper rectangles, squares, and lines of various sizes and shades suggestive of movement and depth."

(The Museum of Modern Art)

Fig. 1 Germany, 1921. 3 min. Film in the permanent collection of The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2010 Hans Richter

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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