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Which clippings match 'Software Art' keyword pg.1 of 1
14 NOVEMBER 2014

Body Navigation: austere ambience of projection-dance work

"Two dancers and their digital reproduction are the scenographic frame of this humorous and emotional portrait of human relations. Based on rules and structured in a game like manner, the installation makes way for a playful dialog between the man, woman and the digital 'footprints' they leave behind.

The Body Navigation performance was originally part of a larger installation and modern dance performance in Copenhagen, by Tim Rushton, Danish Dance Theatre called Labyrint.

We used processing for the infrared blobtracking of the dancers and drawing the open gl graphics. During the performance Tina controlled the whole thing live from an Isadora–based interface via osc."

Body Navigation: dance installation and choreography for Labyrint at Kaleidoskop K2, Copenhagen 2008. Video artist: Ole Kristensen and Jonas Jongejan; choreography: Tina Tarpgaard; dancers: Hilary Briggs, Luca Marazia, Nelson R. R. Smith and Laura Lohi; produced by: Danish Dance Theatre.

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2008 • Athelas Sinfonietta • austere ambience • austere environment • black and white • body movement • Body Navigation (2008) • boundary functionschoreographyCopenhagendance performance • Danish Dance Theatre • digital footprints • digital reproduction • doppelgangerfloor • footprints • geometry • Gyorgy Ligeti • Hilary Briggs • human re­lations • infrared camera • infrared tracking • interactive projectioninteractive videoIsadora • Jonas Jongejan • Kaleidoskop K2 • Laura Lohi • Luca Marazia • Mathias Friis-Hansen • movement performance • Nelson Smith • Ole Kristensen • Open Sound Control (OSC) • palimpsestpartition of spacepatterns of movementperformance • play­ful dialogue • playful workPongprojected from overhead • Recoil Performance Group • scenograph­ic frame • software artspatial mapping • Tina Tarpgaard • tracingtrajectoryvideo projectionvoronoi

CONTRIBUTOR

Anna Troisi
09 DECEMBER 2012

The Art & Media Course at Tama Art University in Japan

"Art & Media Course in Information Design Department of Tama Art University manages various kinds of art forms by utilizing digital technologies and bio medias, such like interactive installations, audio & visual performances, software arts, bio arts, digital animations, and future cinemas. Through the background of recent dynamic changes of relationship between technology and human society, we aim to bring up new types of multi–skilled creators who can transcend the traditional boundaries of fine arts, science, engineering, mathematics and philosophy.The Course has established unique creative environment configured by four individual laboratories which has their own research themes."

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applied media arts • art and culture • Art and Media Course in Information Design Department • art forms • art history • art media • art theorybio artbio data • bio media art • CGIcommunication designcommunication design education • communications networks • community arts • craft and materials • creative cinema • cultural and social relations • Department of Information Design • design coursedesign managementdesign theory • digital animation • digital architecturedigital technologiesdrawing • Faculty of Fine Arts • fine art • future cinema • future phenomenology • human interfaces • IDDlab • information and society • information design • information networks • information without form • integrated media arts • interaction designinteractive artinterdisciplinary workingJapankinetic artmedia arts • media design history • media design theory • media information literacy • multi-skilled creatorsnew craftsperforming arts • social network theory • software artsound art • Tama Art University • technology and human societytime-based artvideo artvideo mediavisual literacyvisual media • write objects

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2012

Joshua Nimoy: representing digital culture in film

"I take representing digital culture in film very seriously in lieu of having grown up in a world of very badly researched user interface greeble. I cringed during the part in Hackers (1995) when a screen saver with extruded 'equations' is used to signify that the hacker has reached some sort of neural flow or ambiguous destination. I cringed for Swordfish and Jurassic Park as well. I cheered when Trinity in The Matrix used nmap and ssh (and so did you). Then I cringed again when I saw that inevitably, Hollywood had decided that nmap was the thing to use for all its hacker scenes (see Bourne Ultimatum, Die Hard 4, Girl with Dragon Tattoo, The Listening, 13: Game of Death, Battle Royale, Broken Saints, and on and on). In Tron, the hacker was not supposed to be snooping around on a network; he was supposed to kill a process. So we went with posix kill and also had him pipe ps into grep. I also ended up using emacs eshell to make the terminal more l33t. The team was delighted to see my emacs performance –– splitting the editor into nested panes and running different modes. I was tickled that I got emacs into a block buster movie. I actually do use emacs irl, and although I do not subscribe to alt.religion.emacs, I think that's all incredibly relevant to the world of Tron."

(Joshua T. Nimoy)

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13: Game of Death • Adobe • alt.religion.emacs • Andy King • art of code • Battle Royale • blockbuster • Bourne Ultimatum • Bradley Munkowitz • Broken Saints • C++CG • CG artist • Cinema 4D • code • Consumer eXperience Design • CXD • David Lewandowski • Die Hard 4 • digital culture • Digital Domain • Emacs • emacs eshell • emacs irl • Eshell • film • Girl with Dragon Tattoo • GREPhacker • Hackers (film) • Hollywood • Houdini (software) • Jake Sargeant • Jurassic Park (film) • l33t • Linux • Media and Visual Designer • network • nmap • OpenFrameworksOpenGL • pipe ps • POSIX • posix kill • Processing (software) • screen saver • software artspecial effects • SSH • Swordfish (film) • terminal • The Listening • The Matrix (1999)Tron • TRON: Legacy • user interfaceVFX • wxWidgets

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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