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Which clippings match 'Laszlo Moholy-Nagy' keyword pg.1 of 1
12 SEPTEMBER 2014

MoMA: Geometry of Motion 1920s/1970s

Geometry of Motion 1920s/1970s, March 19–July 28, 2008, The Yoshiko and Akio Morita Media Gallery, second floor, The Museum of Modern Art.

"This exhibition considers the transformation of the art object from static image to light projection within two distinct artistic lineages: the unconventional optical techniques and social analyses of the 1920s Neue Optik, or 'New Vision,' generation of artists, among them László Moholy–Nagy, Hans Richter, and Marcel Duchamp; and the situational aesthetics advanced by Gordon Matta–Clark, Robert Smithson, and Anthony McCall in the 1970s. Drawing attention to the conditions and complexities of perception–both within the framework of institutional display and in other surroundings–these artists have redefined the social potential of visual agency."

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TAGS

1920s1970safterimage • Anthony McCall • art object • artistic lineage • durationEl Lissitzkyexhibitionexperimental cinema • fluid light projection • geometric abstraction • Gordon Matta-Clark • Hans Richter • Hollis Frampton • immaterialityintangible creationsJames Turrell • Klaus Biesenbach • Laszlo Moholy-Nagylight and space • light and space movement • light artlight projectionMarcel Duchamp • Maria Nordman • materialisationmotion artsmovementmovement-image • moving through space • Museum of Modern Art • Neue Optik (New Vision) • non-narrative • objecthood • objecthood and space • optical techniques • Paul Sharits • peripatetic • Richard Serra • Robert Irving (artist) • Robert Irwin • Robert Smithson • Roxana Marcoci • solid light films • static image • structural film • VernissageTV (VTV) • Viking Eggeling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JANUARY 2014

100+ Years of Design Manifestos

"Since the days of radical printer–pamphleteers, design and designers have a long history of fighting for what's right and working to transform society. The rise of the literary form of the manifesto also parallels the rise of modernity and the spread of letterpress printing. ...

The original list was largely drawn from Mario Piazza's presentation at the Più Design Può conference in Florence, though I've edited and added to it. I've also incorporated links where I was able to find them."

(John Emerson, 22 July 2009, Social Design Notes)

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TAGS

Albe Steiner • Alberto Marangoni • Allan Chochinov • anti-manifesto • Antonio Sant Elia • architectureArts and Crafts MovementBauhaus School • Blair Enns • Bruce MauBruce SterlingBruno TautDanish designDe Stijl • Dean Allen • design manifesto • Dieter RamsDogme 95El Lissitzky • Ellen Lupton • Filippo Tommaso MarinettiFuturism • Gelsomino DAmbrosio • Giancarlo Iliprandi • Gianfranco Torri • Giovanni Anceschi • Giovanni Baule • Giovanni Lussu • GNUgood designgraphic designGuy DebordIcogradainfographicsJeffrey Zeldman • Karim Rashid • Kathleen Hanna • Ken Garland • Laszlo Moholy-Nagyletterpress printing • literary form • manifestoManuel Lima • Mario Piazza • Mark Goldman • Marke Hamburg • Michael Erard • Mitch Goldstein • Noah Scalin • pamphleteer • Patrik Schumacher • Pierre Bernard • Pino Grimaldi • publishing • radical rethinking • Scandinavian Design Council • Society of the Spectacle (Guy Debord)typography • Umair Haque • un-manifesto • Walter Gropius • Warren Berger • William McDonough • William Morris

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
27 OCTOBER 2012

Kurt Kranz: programming of beauty

Kurt Kranz: Programming of beauty, Exhibition marking the 100th birthday of Kurt Kranz
19th November 2010 to 29th May 2011.

"Inspired by a lecture by László Moholy–Nagy, Kurt Kranz came to the Bauhaus Dessau in April 1930. In Walter Peterhans's photography class, Kranz began to experiment with photographic techniques and created some of the most striking abstract picture series to emerge from the Bauhaus. Alienated and abstracted faces and hands appear repeatedly in his dynamic picture series. These show Kranz's early affinity for film as, page for page, the abstract forms interact with one another. Kranz drafted his first concepts for abstract films at the Bauhaus, although he was first able to realise these decades later in 1972.

The exhibition to mark the artist's 100th birthday shows works from Kranz's Bauhaus years and his later work as an advertising graphic designer, and focuses on a selection of his large picture cycles. Strikingly diverse leporellos dating from the 1960s onwards take centre stage, as do the so–called 'Matrix– und Schiebebilder'."

(Bauhaus Dessau Foundation)

Fig.1 Kurt Kranz, Versinkende (Sinking one), 1931, Ingrid Kranz / Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau [http://artblart.com/2011/05/18/exhibition–kurt–kranz–programming–of–beauty–at–the–bauhaus–dessau/].

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TAGS

1931 • abstract films • abstract forms • abstract picture series • advertising graphic designer • Bauhaus DessauBauhaus Schoolcut-outdesign formalismface • Kurt Kranz • Laszlo Moholy-Nagy • leporello • photocollagephotographic experimentationphotographic image • photographic techniques • photographyphotomontage • picture cycles • picture series • sinking • visual communication • Walter Peterhans

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 FEBRUARY 2004

Moholy-Nagy: Frames Within Space-frames

"A primary characteristic of the 'language' of montage is its tendency towards multiple and layered meanings. One example of this multiplicity is the combination of incongruous visual and verbal elements within the space of a single picture. ...these individual elements are combined in compositions, which are more like energy fields than traditional perspectival space (with its attendant sense of rational time). The syntax of montage is non–linear; any single element tends towards a multiplicity of possible connections with other elements. Meanings are contextual and relative, and the literalness of photography gives way to metaphor, metonymy and allegory. These effects are created not only by the cutting and fragmentation of elements but also by the space between the elements which, like gaps that must be jumped, activate and energise the image. It would not be incorrect to see these 'fields' as a kind of shattered mirror reflection of the energy, confusion and contradictions of life as the Dadaists saw it. Many of their works, however, emphasise the desire, perhaps the necessity, to see below this surface reflection to the underlying structure of society or the psyche. Iconographically, the most consistent reminder of that desire is the repeated use of anatomical photographs and diagrams in the work of Hausmann and Ernst. In addition to their visual impact as figures, these elements tend to constantly remind the viewer to be conscious of what is below the surface, even if that underlying layer is not visible. Thus, during this period the foundations were laid for the Surrealists' examination of the unconscious and for John Heartfield's satirical analysis of the ideology of Nazi Germany in the early 30's. Apart from and following Dada's end as an organised movement, important photomontages were also produced by Constructivist artists such as Lazio Moholy–Nagy and Alexander Rodchenko."
(John Pickel, 1988)

Fig.1
Title on Object: Eifersucht
Published Title: Jealousy

1927
collage with photographic/photo–mechanical and drawn elements
63.8 x 56.1 cm.
Museum Purchase; ex–collection Sybil Moholy–Nagy
GEH NEG: 4339
81:2163:0011

Old GEH Number: 4685–11

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