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22 OCTOBER 2012

Timeline illustration of 1000 names of Sony Music artists since 1887

"Sony Music has unveiled a graphic installation documenting the company's 125 year musical history. Designed by Alex Fowkes, winner of Creative Review's 'One to Watch' in 2011, the Sony Music Timeline runs throughout the central atrium of Sony's open plan Derry Street offices.

The Installation features nearly 1000 names of artists signed to Sony Music and its affiliated labels from the foundation of Columbia Records in 1887 to the present day, including musical icons Elvis Presley, Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Janis Joplin, The Clash, Micheal Jackson and many many more.

Interspersed among the artist names are certain key developments in technology, musical formats and corporate history – from the invention of early recording cylinders to vinyl, cassette, CD, radio, MTV, the Sony Walkman, the iPod and the introduction of digital streaming services.

The work is organised by decade into 54 columns measuring over 2 meters tall and covering almost 150 square meters of wall space. It uses CNC cut vinyl as the sole medium for the whole installation.

Emma Pike, VP Industry Relations, who commissioned the piece said, 'The brief was to bring the inspiration of our music into the heart of our building and make our office space live and breathe our incredible musical legacy. Alex's beautiful graphics and illustrations do exactly that.'

Sony's partnership with Fowkes is set to continue as the Sony Music Timeline will grow each year with the addition of new artist names signed by the major.'"

(Sony Music, 2012)

Sony Music Timeline Process Video, Design & Art Direction: Alex Fowkes Photography & Video: Rob Antill, Music Production: Joseph Bird.

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TAGS

125 years • 18872012 • Alex Fowkes • analogue and digital formatsBob DylanBruce SpringsteencassetteCD • Columbia Records • consumer electronicscorporate historyCreative Review (magazine)design innovation • developments in technology • digital streamingdigital technologyearly recording technologyElvis Presley • Emma Pike • graphic illustrationhistoryhistory of information technologyhistory of recording technologyinformation designiPod • Janis Joplin • Jimi Hendrix • Lex Media • Michael JacksonMTV • music artist • music artsmusic formatmusic history • musical legacy • Paul Sexton • pioneering technologyposter illustrationproduct designradio • recording cylinder • Rob AntillSonySony MusicSony Walkmantechnology convergenceThe Clashtimelapsetimelinevinyl record

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JULY 2012

Stadium UK: BBC Olympics title sequence revealed

"RKCR/Y&R, Red Bee Media and Passion Pictures' director Pete Candeland turn the UK into a giant sporting venue for the BBC's Olympics marketing trail and title sequences

Super–stylised athletes are seen competing in Scottish lochs, terraced streets and around London in the film which will be used across all the BBC's TV and digital Olympics content. The film also features Five Steps, the Olympics 'theme tune' written by Elbow.

RKCR/Y&R developed the concept, the animation was by Passion and the sequence was produced by Red Bee Media. It will be used for the BBC's 2012 title sequences and on desktop, mobile tablets and 'connected' TV content. A full two–minute, 40 second version will be premiered on BBC ONe on July 3. 60, 40, 30 and five second versions will be used throughout the Games."

(Creative Review, 2 July 2012, 10:12)

Fig.1 BBC "Stadium UK" created by Agency: RKCR/Y&R; ECD: Damon Collins; Creatives: Jules Chalkley, Nick Simons, Ted Heath, Paul Angus; Production company: Passion Pictures/Red Bee Media; Animation production company: Passion Pictures; Director: Pete Candeland.
Fig.2 Published on 24 Jul 2012 by "london2012", the London 2012 Olympic mascots Wenlock and Mandeville.

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20123D3D animationadvertisingadvertising campaignanimationanimation production • athlete • BBC • BBC Children in Need • BBC Philharmonic Orchestra • BBC TV • connected TV content • Creative Review (magazine) • Damon Collins • Elbow (band) • Five Steps (music) • Jules Chalkley • landmarkslandscapeLondonLondon 2012 Olympics • Mandeville • marketing campaign • marketing trail • Nick Simons • NovaVox gospel choir • official trailerOlympic GamesOlympic Games 2012Olympic StadiumOlympics • Olympics content • Passion Pictures • Paul Angus • Pete Candeland • promotion • Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe Y&R • Red Bee Media • RKCR/Y&R • Scottish lochs • sport • Sport Relief • sporting arena • sporting venue • Stadium UK • Team GB • Ted Heath • terraced streets • theme tunetitle sequenceUKUnited Kingdomvisual design • Wenlock

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 APRIL 2012

Butcher's Hook: three students repurpose an old London butcher's shop to establish their design studio

"Butcher's Hook is (or perhaps that should be will be) a three–member design studio and gallery based in an old butcher's shop in London's Portobello. The studio has been formed by Benio Urbanowicz, James Coltman, Josh Blanchett and Dan Jones, students from Kingston and LLC, all of whom graduate this summer. ...

In order to introduce themselves to the local populace, Butcher's Hook set up a digital display using an old Nintendo Wii remote, custom made Infa–Red yellow pencils, a wireless doorbell, a printer and a few extra ingredients.

'We gave away free art made by the user themselves, with the option to receive a digital copy sent to them,' they say. 'We had a great weekend, where over 150 people got involved, through their own choice... and every single one went home to find our business cards printed on the back of their own masterpiece.'

As well as launching their studio, Butcher's Hook has also entered the project into the D&AD Student Awards in response to the brief Make Your Mark."

Posted by Creative Review, 4 April 2012, 16:13

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2012 • Benio Urbanowicz • BFIbook cover designbusiness incubatorButchers Hook • butchers shop • competitioncreative industriesCreative Review (magazine)custom madeD and AD • Dan Jones • design businessdesign studentsdesign studio • design studio and gallery • digital copy • digital display • DIYemploymententrepreneurshipgraduate bridgegraduate designersgraduatesgraphic designindustry realitiesinfraredinitiative • James Coltman • Josh Blanchett • Kingston University • launching a studio • LLC • local community projects • LondonLondon College of Communication (UAL) • Make Your Mark • new studio • Nintendo Wiipencil • Portobello • real-life studiorepurposingstart-upstudent awardsstudents • walk-in studio • window dressing • wireless doorbe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 APRIL 2012

Another Graphic Design Graduate: So Much Left to Learn

"Butcher's Hook is a design studio in London's Portobello formed by soon–to–be graduates of Kingston University and LCC in response to a D&AD brief in which students are encouraged to Make Their Mark.

It was featured on Creative Review's blog this morning.

http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr–blog/2012/april/butchers–hook–say–hello

By providing 'design for the local community' with a pledge to spend at least 10% of their time working on community projects, the students have started their own design agency and they haven't even left college yet.

Whilst Creative Review seem impressed by the students' ambitious move away from the computer screen to find their own work, it is clear these graduates haven't ventured into industry yet. Whilst I am happy to celebrate the initiative and drive that these students clearly have and I do not deny their talent and bravery, I am rather cynical of its potential. With 6 months experience, I am struggling to find a job in London and, like many graduates, have considered setting out on my own. What has prevented me from doing anything more than mildly pondering over the thought, is my lack of knowledge and experience.

Working on your own, or in a small team requires flawless Mac [computer] skills, impeccable design skills and not to mention bravery and confidence. It is also worth considering that client liaison skills can not be forged over night and the time and attention this occupies should not be underestimated. I once worked with an agency that was not much more than a year old and I didn't see them design anything all week. The agency was made up of just the two of them, and whilst their work is impressive and their client list respectable, they spent almost the entire day liaising with clients, organising the next week's schedule and discussing production. Whilst I have nothing good in terms of design to show from that placement, I can't deny I came out much more knowledgeable and more certain that I wasn't ready for that yet. The two of them had at least 8 years experience from a top London design agency, which not only prepared them for production and project management alongside design, but no doubt aided their client list too.

For me, The Butcher's Hook epitomises what is wrong with graduates. University teaches ideas, a little in the way of typographic principle and basic Adobe operation skills. Most importantly, university teaches arrogance. It wasn't until I started my first placement, I realised how little I actually knew. Idealistic tutors cherish the students' naivete and love for design, and keep from them what the reality is like. My biggest fear about starting out on my own would be the lack of good projects, which is something well–established agencies can provide you with. On your own, a new and unreliable studio, you lack the knowledge and experience that can get you good clients with impressive budgets. Low budget work can be dull to design and the project management and client liaison can become stressful. Designing on a budget is harder. Students only design ideas and don't often have to worry about the production costs and client needs. I would be interested to see what local community work these graduates get at Butcher's Hook, and whether they have the stamina and love for design to keep it going. I wish them good luck, but wouldn't encourage other graduates to do the same. Never underestimate how much you have left to learn."

(anonymous, 5 April 2012)

TAGS

2012Adobe • Adobe Creative Suite Design Premium • Adobe Creative Suite Master Collection • Adobe software • Another Graphic Design Graduate (blog) • arrogance • business realityButchers Hookclient liaison • client liaison skills • client list • client needs • community projects • computer skillsCreative Review (magazine)D and ADdesign agencydesign business • design for the local community • design graduatesdesign ideasdesign industrydesign skillsdesign softwaredesign studentdesign studio • designing on a budget • find a job • get a jobgraduategraduatesgraphic design graduate • graphic design intern • graphic designeridealistic tutorsindustry placementinternshipKingston Universityknowledge and experience • lack of experience • lack of knowledge • LCC • liaising with clients • London • love for design • low budget • Mac skills • make their mark • my first placement • naive • production management • project managementrequirements gathering • setting out on your own • small team • starting out on your own • typographic principlesUK • well-established agencies • working on your own

CONTRIBUTOR

Shaun Belcher
03 MARCH 2012

Open journalism: the newspaper is moving beyond a newspaper

"If the story of the Three Little Pigs broke today, how would a modern newspaper cover it? That's the concept behind a new TV ad for The Guardian, the newspaper's first major TV spot for 25 years.

The spot launches a campaign to promote the paper's 'open journalism' approach–its name for the way in which it is attempting to involve its readership in not just commenting on stories, but contributing to and even determining its news agenda. 'Open is our operating system, a way of doing things that is based on a belief in the open exchange of information, ideas and opinions and its power to bring about change,' said Alan Rusbridger, editor–in–chief of Guardian and MediaGuardian publisher Guardian News & Media. 'The campaign is designed to bring that philosophy to life for new and existing readers.'

The launch ad examines the way in which the tale of the Three Little Pigs might be covered by The Guardian today, with all the different forms of content and different channels that implies. It also seeks to get over the way in which stories develop over time as new facts come to light and the effect of social media on switching the focus of coverage and debate.

An epic two–minute version (shown above) debuted on Channel 4 last night.

Comparisons will inevitably be made with 1986's classic Points of View by BMP (indeed the Guardian itself has said that the new ad is a 'nod' to the old one. They share an endline: The Whole Picture).

But while Points of View got over its message succintly and elegantly, Three Little Pigs is less focussed, less pithy. This can be seen as a reflection of the changing nature of media–newspapers are now less about relating THE story and more about acting as a platform for multiple strands around a topic to be explored by multiple participants, including the readers themselves, in real time. But it makes for a less memorable piece of advertising storytelling.

'The aim is to reach progressive audiences and show them why they should spend time with us,' according to Andrew Miller, chief executive of the Guardian's parent company Guardian Media Group. But you have to wonder whether such progressive types would not be aware of what the Guardian is doing anyway? The ad will probably make existing Guardian readers feel better about themselves, but will its slightly daunting complexity attract many new ones?"

(Patrick Burgoyne, 1 March 2012, Creative Review)

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adadvertisersauthorityauthorship • Bartle Bogle Hegarty • BBH (advertising agency) • bloggingcitizen journalismcoverageCreative Review (magazine)debate • depth of coverage • digital firstdigital publishingend of printjournalismmediamedia convergencemedia landscapemedia paradigm shift • news editor • newspaperold media • open journalism • open software • printprint mediaprint publishingpublishingpublishing model • range of coverage • readershipThe GuardianThe Whole Picture • Three Little Pigs • traditiontransformationtruth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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