Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Digital Materialism' keyword pg.1 of 1
24 NOVEMBER 2016

Download Finished (2006): a procedural video machine

"Download Finished was an online ressource which transformed and re-published films from P2P networks and online archives. Found footage became the rough material for the transformation machine, which translated the underlying data structure of the films onto the surface of the screen. The original images dissolved into pixels, thus making the hidden data structure visible. Through Download Finished, file sharers became authors by re-interpreting their most beloved films. ...

Download Finished questions the relationship between the original and its copy in a digital environment. It deals with questions arising from the cultural practice of file sharing (and the breakages and voids it makes evident within the copyright system)."

(!Mediengruppe Bitnik)

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!Mediengruppe Bitnik (arts collective) • 2006 • Adnan Hadzi • aesthetics • algorithmic reconfiguration • algorithmic remixing • algorithmic transformation • art projectartefactingauthorship • automatic composition • Carmen Weisskopf • chance artcorrupting digital datacut-up • Daniel Ryser • data glitches • data remixing • databendingdigital aestheticsdigital detritusdigital errorsdigital materialismdistortion • Domagoj Smoljo • Download Finished (2006) • found footage • generative works • glitch aestheticsglitch practitionersglitched out video • online ressource • P2P • procedural remixing • procedural transformation • procedural video machine • re-publishreinterpretation • reinterpreting • remixedrepurposingsynthesis machines • system-based synthesise • systems arttech-art • transformation machine • transformed by technology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 SEPTEMBER 2014

Automatic Art: human and machine processes that make art

Exhibition: 3 July–10 September 2014, GV Art gallery, London, 49 Chiltern Street, Marylebone, London W1U 6LY.

"This exhibition presents 50 years of British art that is generated from strict procedures. The artists make their work by following rules or by writing computer programs. They range from system–based paintings and drawings to evolving computer generated images."

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2014algorithmic art • Anthony Hill • Automatic Art (exhibition) • boredomresearch • British artchance artcomputer artcomputer art practicecomputer generated artcomputerised artdesign formalismdigital art exhibitiondigital artworkdigital materialism • Dominic Boreham • Ernest Edmonds • exhibitiongenerative artgenerative designgouache • GV Art Gallery • Harold Cohen • Jeffrey Steele • John Carter • Julie Freeman • Kenneth Martin • latticemachine-made • Malcolm Hughes • Michael Kidner • Nathan Cohen • orderly patternsorganisational processPaul Brown • Paul Smith (boredomresearch) • Peter Lowe • procedural artprocess artrule-based work • Sean Clark • simple rulesStephen BellStephen Scrivener • Steve Sproates • Susan Tebby • system-based drawing • system-based painting • systems art • Terry Pope • Trevor Clarke • Vicky Isley (boredomresearch) • visual abstractionvisual art • William Latham

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2014

Bruce Sterling: afterglow effects and digital detritus

"Cypherpunk writer, journalist and critic Bruce Sterling gives a talk on the future of digital culture and its seedy (geo)politics at the opening ceremony of transmediale 2014 afterglow, January 29,2014. Introduction by Kristoffer Gansing."

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2014 • afterglow • afterglow effects • afterlife of objects • Andy Cameron • Arduinoart production • atemporality • Bruce Sterlingcomputational artscyberpunkcypherpunkdebrisdigital anthropologydigital culturedigital detritusdigital graveyarddigital materialismDIYDragan Espenschiede-waste • electronic frontier • entropyGeocitiesgeopolitical landscapegeopolitics • gold rush • Grateful Deadhackinginternet of things • John Perry Barlow • Kristoffer Gansing • lived condition • means of production • mulch • net artnet.artnetartobsolescenceobsolete ecologiesobsolete technologyOlia Lialinapunch cardsRaspberry Piredundant technology • Richard Barbrook • surveillance • techart • the futureTransmediale festival • Walt Whitman

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
18 JANUARY 2012

Glitch art: created purposefully through databending and corruption

"Data glitches are unavoidable. As technology gets more complex, it's easier and easier for a small bug to creep in and ruin your perfect data. But a growing number of artists in different fields are coming to value these glitches, and have begun attempting to insert them purposefully into their work using a technique called 'databending'.

'Glitch art' is a term that there's some debate over: Many argue that it can only apply when a glitch is unintentional –– when it occurs naturally due to an error in hardware or software that leads to the corruption of whatever it is the artist was trying to create.

But there are ways of intentionally inducing some of these glitches, a process called 'databending'. Databending draws its name from the practice of circuit bending –– a practice where childrens' toys, cheap keyboards and effects pedals are deliberately short–circuited by bending the circuit board to generate spontaneous and unpredictable sounds."

(Duncan Geere, 17 August 2010, Wired UK)

Fig.1 Don Relyea, "glitched out video".

Fig.2 David Szauder, "supra glitch".

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aestheticisationaestheticsanalogue errorsartartefactingartefacts • bug • bugs • circuit bending • corrupting digital code • corrupting digital datacorruptioncraft as conceptdatadata glitchesdatabendingdegradationdesign formalismdigitaldigital culturedigital detritusdigital errorsdigital materialismdistortionerrorexperimentationgenerativeglitchglitch aestheticsglitch artglitch practitionersglitched out videoglitches • glitschig • inducing glitches • malfunction • perfect data • purposeful glitching • randomnessreadymade • short-circuit • supra glitch • tech-arttechniquetechnologyunintentionallyunpredictability

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2004

Digital Detritus

Oliver Wolf, Lea Filadoro, Josef Renner (Studienbereich Neue Medien Hgkzürich)
Ein User oder eine Gruppe kann sich die Müllabfuhr ins 'Haus' holen (abonnieren für einen best. Zeitraum ). Dabei wird sämtlicher von den einzelnen Personen 'angefertigter' Datenmüll in einem kollektiven Mülleimer eingesammelt (Sammeln) und grob gesiebt/gescannt(Trennung). Dieser kollektive Müll (Mülleimer als Repräsentant der Information) kann dann wiederrum durchforstet werden (Recycling) und für den Einzelnen/ die Gruppe sichtbar gemacht werden (Aufbereitung).

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