Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Supply Chain' keyword pg.1 of 1
28 MARCH 2015

Make informed purchasing decisions using Palm Oil barcode scanner

"POI (Palm Oil Investigations) has launched a Palm Oil barcode scanner for Australia and New Zealand products. ...

Scan the product barcode. Read the palm oil status. Select an alternative ethical product. Send a pre-written email to the company. Hit buy to compile ethical purchasing percentages and share your percentage to social media so you can show how you are making a difference.

Around 40% of products on supermarket shelves contain palm oil. Palm oil is a common ingredient in food (Biscuits, bakery items, Ice Cream, Chocolate, Confectionery, Crisps, Margarine, Health food bars, Cereals) etc. Derivatives of the oil are common in personal care products (Shampoo, Conditioner, Soaps, Skin care, Toothpaste) as well as household cleaning and detergents.

Rarely labelled by its correct name, palm oil is the hidden ingredient. There are over 200 names for palm oil its derivatives, the most common is the generic term vegetable oil. Other common names used in food production are emulsifier 471 and humectant glycerol."

(Palm Oil Investigations)

1

TAGS

alternative ethical products • Android appsAotearoa New ZealandAustralia • bakery items • barcode scannerbarcode scanner appbiodiversitybiscuit • Borneo • cereals • certification status • chocolate • co-exist in the wild • confectionery • consumer advocacyconsumer products in homecrisps • critically endangered species • derivatives • detergentecosystem • El Paso Zoo • elephant • emulsifier • endangered speciesethical consumption • ethical palm oil supply • ethical purchasingextinction • facing extinction • free software • habitat loss • hair conditioner • health food bars • hidden ingredient • household detergents • humectant glycerol • ice cream • industry regulation • iOS appsmargarine • oil palm plantations • orangutanpalm oil • palm oil content • Palm Oil Investigations (POI) • palm oil scanner app • palm oil status • palm oil usage • personal care products • POI Palm Oil Barcode Scanner • product barcode • purchasing decisions • rhinorhinoceros • SE Asia • shampoo • skin care • soaps • South-East Asia • Spectrum Solutions • Sumatra • supermarket shelvessupply chaintiger • toothpaste • tropical forestvegetable oil • virgin rainforest

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 SEPTEMBER 2013

World's first ethical smartphone to launch in UK

"Fairphone, which is described by its makers as 'the world's first ethical smartphone' is set to launch in London. The first prototype of the Fairphone, which has been developed by a team in The Netherlands, will be shown at the London Design Festival next week. Fairphone's makers say they use conflict–free materials and aim to ensure that every worker in the phone's supply chain receives a fair wage."

(Angus Montgomery, 10 Sep 2013, Design Week)

1
2

TAGS

2013 • Action Aid • AmsterdamAndroid OSapplied research • Bas van Abel • black box system • Closing the Loop (programme) • conflict-free • conflict-free materials • Democratic Republic of Congodesign responsibilityDesign Weekethical consumption • fair wage • fairer principles • fairness • Fairphone • Fairtrade • Jelly Bean OS • London Design Festival • made • mobile phoneNetherlands • non-profit organisation • Peoples Republic of Chinaphoneprototype • raise awareness • recyclingresearch projectresponsible designreuse • Schrijf-Schrijf • smartphonesocial enterprise • social values • South Kivu • speculative designsupply chainvaluesWaag Society • wages • workers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

Consultation to reclassify and measure the UK Creative Industries

"The purpose of this consultation is to update the DCMS Creative Industries classification and we are inviting input from interested parties. We have been engaging with industry and partner organisations over potential changes via a Technical Working Group of the Creative Industries Council and are now at a point where we would like to go out to consultation and seek wider views.

We have been working with partners (NESTA, Creative Skillset and Creative and Cultural Skills), to review and update the classification used in the DCMS Creative Industries Economic Estimates (CIEE). We intend to use this review 'Classifying and Measuring the Creative Industries', referenced below, as an objective starting point to suggest which occupations and industries should be included in the updated DCMS classification.

The review uses the idea of 'creative intensity' (the proportion of people doing creative jobs within each industry) to suggest which industries should be included. If the proportion of people doing creative jobs in a particular industry is substantial, above a 30% threshold, the industries are candidates for inclusion within the Creative Industries classification.

Similar to the outlook in our current Creative Industries Economic Estimates, the 'creative intensity' approach focuses on industries where the creative activity happens. The intention is to produce a classification which provides direct estimates of employment and the contribution to the economy, with no double counting – rather than attempting to capture all activity further down the value chain, for example, retail activities. The classification generated in this way can be used as a starting point for indirect estimates which include wider economic effects along the supply chain.

Any approach has data and methods constraints, which may affect some industries more than others. These limitations are reflected in the consultation and consultees are invited to suggest alternatives, supported by evidence–based argument. Weaknesses in the underlying classifications and data used to construct these estimates, which are identified by users, will be fed–back to the organisations which set these standards and provide these data so that we can influence longer–term improvements."

(Department for Culture, Media & Sport, 19 April 2013)

TAGS

2013 • CIEE • classificationclassification scheme • Classifying and Measuring the Creative Industries • contribution to the economy • creative activity • Creative and Cultural Skills • creative industries • Creative Industries classification • Creative Industries Economic Estimates • creative intensity • creative jobs • creative occupations • Creative Skillset • data constraints • DCMS • DCMS Creative Industries Economic Estimates • Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) • economic effects • estimate • estimation • evidence-based argument • government consultation • longer-term improvements • measurement • methods constraints • NESTAproposals • proposed changes • public consultationreview • SOC • Standard Occupational Classification • supply chain • Technical Working Group of the Creative Industries Council • UKUK Governmentvalue chain

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.