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Which clippings match 'Good Design' keyword pg.1 of 2
23 MARCH 2017

Ten years of smartphones (and visions of a circular economy)

"Smartphones sind schlecht zu reparieren, schlecht aufzurüsten, schlecht zu recyceln. Für die Konsumentinnen ist das ärgerlich – und kann für die Hersteller richtig teuer werden. ...

Dass Mobiltelefone eine längere Lebensdauer haben, ist aber ein wichtiger Beitrag zum Umweltschutz: Für ihre Herstellung werden Edelmetalle und so genannte Seltene Erden gebraucht, die unter grossem Energieaufwand und mittels gesundheitsschädigender Chemikalien gefördert werden. Jedes reparierte Telefon schont Ressourcen. Im Auftrag von Greenpeace berechnete das deutsche Oeko-Institut, dass sich die Smartphone-Lebensdauer im Schnitt um 1,5 Jahre verlängern liesse. Nimmt man all das zusammen – Energieaufwand, kurze Lebensspanne und geringe Recyclingquote – wird klar, dass es so nicht endlos weitergehen kann."

(Greenpeace Schweiz, 1 March 2017)

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TAGS

20072017animated explainer videocell phone • circular economy • consumer electronicsconsumerismconsumptiondesign intelligencedesign responsibilitydisposable consumptione-waste • energy expenditure • environmental damage • environmental protection • environmentalismgood designgreen designGreenpeace • Greenpeace Schweiz • harmful chemicalsinternational environmental health and sustainability issues • life span • long-lasting productslonger-lasting productsobsolescence • Oeko-Institut • Oko-Institut • patterns of consumptionplanned obsolescenceprecious metals • product cycles cause • rare earths • recycle and repair • recycling rate • renewable resources • service life • short-lived devices • smartphone • smartphone lifetime • smartphone production • sustainabilitysustainable design principles • technical habits • technology sector

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JANUARY 2014

100+ Years of Design Manifestos

"Since the days of radical printer–pamphleteers, design and designers have a long history of fighting for what's right and working to transform society. The rise of the literary form of the manifesto also parallels the rise of modernity and the spread of letterpress printing. ...

The original list was largely drawn from Mario Piazza's presentation at the Più Design Può conference in Florence, though I've edited and added to it. I've also incorporated links where I was able to find them."

(John Emerson, 22 July 2009, Social Design Notes)

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TAGS

Albe Steiner • Alberto Marangoni • Allan Chochinov • anti-manifesto • Antonio Sant Elia • architectureArts and Crafts MovementBauhaus School • Blair Enns • Bruce MauBruce SterlingBruno TautDanish designDe Stijl • Dean Allen • design manifesto • Dieter RamsDogme 95El Lissitzky • Ellen Lupton • Filippo Tommaso MarinettiFuturism • Gelsomino DAmbrosio • Giancarlo Iliprandi • Gianfranco Torri • Giovanni Anceschi • Giovanni Baule • Giovanni Lussu • GNUgood designgraphic designGuy DebordIcogradainfographicsJeffrey Zeldman • Karim Rashid • Kathleen Hanna • Ken Garland • Laszlo Moholy-Nagyletterpress printing • literary form • manifestoManuel Lima • Mario Piazza • Mark Goldman • Marke Hamburg • Michael Erard • Mitch Goldstein • Noah Scalin • pamphleteer • Patrik Schumacher • Pierre Bernard • Pino Grimaldi • publishing • radical rethinking • Scandinavian Design Council • Society of the Spectacle (Guy Debord)typography • Umair Haque • un-manifesto • Walter Gropius • Warren Berger • William McDonough • William Morris

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
29 SEPTEMBER 2013

Handmade in Britain: The Story of Wallpaper

"In the second programme in the series, presenter Paul Martin reveals the secret history of wallpaper from the 17th century to the present day.

The film explores how wallpaper, seemingly so fragile and easy to replace, provides a vital index of changing tastes in the home. The programme shows how from its earliest days wallpaper imitated other, more costly wall coverings: from the 17th–century papers that were designed to look like embroidered textiles to 18th–century flocked wallpapers. The latter, intended as a cheaper substitute for costly damasks or velvets, became a triumph of British innovation, coming to grace the grandest of state apartments and country house interiors.

Focussing on how wallpaper was actually made, the programme goes onto explore how it became one of the battlefields in discussions about design in the 19th century. For, although technological innovations in machine printing had allowed manufacturers to print elaborate designs with complex colour–ways, some commentators were shocked by the poor aesthetic quality of British wallpapers. The programme looks at how designers and reformers attempted to take the situation in hand: from 'The False Principles of Design', an exhibition organised by Sir Henry Cole, the first Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, which sought to instruct the British public in good and bad design; to the pioneering work of Augustus Pugin and William Morris.

Finally, the film traces the fortunes of wallpaper in the 20th century. Patterned walls faced stiff competition from the purity of plain, painted or whitewashed walls, as advocated by modernists like Le Corbusier. However, new techniques, like screen–printing, allowed shorter runs of innovate wallpapers, which were aimed at architects and interior designers. And, as Paul Martin discovers, wallpaper is still flourishing at the beginning of the 21st century. A combination of digital printing, screen–printing and hand–printing allows companies, like Timorous Beasties, to produce exciting new designs.

Presented by Paul Martin, contributors include Christine Woods, Anthony Wells–Cole, Martha Armitage, Allyson McDermott and Paul Simmons (Timorous Beasties), as well as V&A experts."

First broadcast on 25 September 2013 on BBC Four as part of the Handmade in Britain series [http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03bm1rg].

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TAGS

16th century17th century18th century19th century20th century21st century • Allyson McDermott • Anthony Wells-Cole • antiqueart and craftsArts and Crafts Movement • Augustus Pugin • bad design • BBC Four • changing tastes • Christine Woods • colourways • damask • deluxe item • design craftdigital printingdomestic material object • elaborate designs • embroidered textiles • flock wallpaper • good design • hand-printing • Handmade in Britain (series) • Henry Cole • industrial grime • interior design • interior designer • interior stylingLe Corbusierluxury • machine printing • makersmanufacturing technology • Marthe Armitage • Palladio Wallpapers • pattern • Paul Martin • Paul Simmons • poisonprinting processscreenprinting • stately homes • technological innovation • The False Principles of Design • Timorous Beasties • two-up-two-down • velvetVictoria and Albert Museum • wall coverings • wallpaperwallpaper design • wallpapering • William Morris

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JANUARY 2013

Dieter Rams: lasting principles for good design

"Tom Dyckhoff meets up with Dieter Rams, whose designs have found a permanent home in museums over the world."

The Culture Show, Episode 17, broadcast on Thursday 3 December 2009 23:20 BBC Two.

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TAGS

19561960 • 606 Universal Shelving System • BBC TwoBraun • Braun PCS 5 • component systemconsumer electronicsconsumer productsdesign formalismDieter Ramsformalist design aestheticsFrankfurtgood designindustrial designindustrial designerJonathan Ivelong-lasting productslonger-lasting products • Mishal Husain • modular designmodular systemnew materialsPhilippe Starck • plattenspieler • product design • shelving • SK4 (record player) • Tom Dixon • Tom Dyckhoff • Vitsoe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2012

The history of the UK Design Council

"The Design Council started life in 1944 as the Council of Industrial Design. It was founded by Hugh Dalton, President of the Board of Trade in the wartime Government, and its objective was 'to promote by all practicable means the improvement of design in the products of British industry'. And that was to stay unaltered through half a century of social, technological and economic change."

(UK Design Council)

Fig.1 "1951 Festival of Britain", Graphic created by: Design Council/Council of Industrial Design | From University of Brighton Design Archives. [JRGS Alumni Society: http://www.mel–lambert.com/Ruskin/News/News_Archive/JRGS02A_News_Archive32.htm]

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TAGS

1944 • Board of Trade (UK) • Britain Can Make It • British industry • Buy wisely in Britain • CABE • Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment • consumers • Council of Industrial Design (UK) • Creative Britain • creative economy • David Kester • Design Centre (UK) • Design Council (UK)design educationdesign fielddesign historydesign industrydesign practitioners • design reform • design work • Festival of Britain • good design • Hugh Dalton • industrial design • Ivor Owen • John Sorrell • Keith Grant • manufacturing • Millenium Products • post-warprofessional association for designrealisation rulesrecognition rulesretailers • S C Leslie • shared practices • Sir Gordon Russell • Sir Paul Reilly • technological changeUKwartime

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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