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Which clippings match 'Stockholm' keyword pg.1 of 2
10 MARCH 2014

Blowing in the Wind: metro station screen reacts to train arrival

"On behalf of Åkestam Holst and Apotek Hjärtat we modified one of Clear Channel's Play screens on Odenplans subway platform. The mission was to capture the effect of the turbulence from the train and make it look like the models hair on the screen was caught by the breeze.

To do this we needed to build a device that could be calibrated to sense the arrival of the train and not react to passing passengers. Using an ultra sonic sensor, connected to a Raspberry Pi and a local network socket, we connected our device to the screens computer where the film could be activated by the passing trains.

Stopp managed the shooting and post production of all video material used for the customized screen at Odenplan and all other Play screens around the subway.

A simple idea, well executed, that let us use existing technology in a new way. The installation was appreciated by the head of Clear Channel and as a result Apotek Hjärtat was offered to keep it live for five additional days, as a way for them to show the opportunities their screens can offer."

(STOPP/STHLM)

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TAGS

2014adadvertising in public spacesadvertising screens • Akestam Holst • apolosophy • Apotek • Apotek Hjartat • arriving train • breeze • caught by the breeze • Clear Channel • Clear Channel Play • digital billboardsdigital screenshair • hair product • hair tousled by the wind • interactive animations • interactive subway ad • local network socket • metro station • moving train • Odenplan • Odenplan metro station • passing trains • pharmacyrail advertisingrailway advertisingrailway stationRaspberry PiStockholm • STOPP (integrated production company) • subwaySwedentrain arrivaltrain stationturbulence • ultra sonic sensor • ultrasonic sensor

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2013

Nobel winner declares boycott of top science journals

"Leading academic journals are distorting the scientific process and represent a 'tyranny' that must be broken, according to a Nobel prize winner who has declared a boycott on the publications.

Randy Schekman, a US biologist who won the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine this year and receives his prize in Stockholm on Tuesday, said his lab would no longer send research papers to the top–tier journals, Nature, Cell and Science.

Schekman said pressure to publish in 'luxury' journals encouraged researchers to cut corners and pursue trendy fields of science instead of doing more important work. The problem was exacerbated, he said, by editors who were not active scientists but professionals who favoured studies that were likely to make a splash."

(Ian Sample, Monday 9 December 2013, The Guardian)

TAGS

2013 • academic credibility • academic impactacademic journalsacademic papersacademic workassessing impactassessment of scholarshipboycott • Cell and Science (journal) • citation-based measures of impactcredible information • cut corners • eLife (online journal) • journal impactlevel playing fieldmeasurement of impactmedical researchNature (journal)Nobel Prizeperformativity • physiology or medicine • publication of academic papersquantitative study of scholarship • Randy Schekman • research impactresearch papers • science journals • science researchscientific community • scientific credibility • scientific processStockholmThe Guardian • top-tier journals • Wellcome Trust • working scientists

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 NOVEMBER 2012

Hyper Island: designing learning experiences to stay creative and competitive in an increasingly digitised world

"For over 15 years Hyper Island has been designing learning experiences for students and industry professionals alike. It all started with three men, a few beers, and one vision. The year was 1994, and multimedia pioneers Lars Lundh, Jonathan Briggs, and David Erixon converged in bar in Stockholm to discuss an upcoming CD–ROM project.

Together they realized their new digital world demanded a new kind of learning: industry–based learning. They envisioned a new institution that could prepare people for the lightening–fast pace of the modern workplace. A place where students could grow, not only as professionals, but also as human beings. ...

Hyper Island is now a thriving global presence, with two main areas of focus. Student Programs immerse young talent in intensive learning experiences from digital art direction to e–Commerce to data strategy. Executive Programs boost understanding of how digital changes societies and consumer behavior –– and how organizations need to change to stay creative and competitive in an increasingly digitized world. Hyper Island is now worldwide, located in Stockholm, Karlskrona, New York, London, and soon, Singapore. And Executive Programs teams can travel around the world designing and executing learning experiences for Fortune 500 companies and start–ups alike.

As the digital world shifts and evolves, Hyper Island continues to react and expand, creating an agile, forward–looking learning environment for students and industry leaders. What began as a bold experiment on a windswept island has become a revolutionary way to learn, reflect, collaborate, and above all, innovate."

(Charlotte Sundåker)

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1994 • bold experiment • CD-ROM • centre for learning • challenging students • collaborateconsumer behaviourcreativity and innovation • data strategy • David Erixon • designing learning experiences • digital art direction • digital changes societies • digital worlddigitised worlde-commerceexperiential learningHyper Islandindustry leadersindustry professionals • industry-based learning • innovate • intensive learning experiences • Jonathan Briggs • Karlskrona • Lars Lundh • learning environmentLondonmultimedia • new digital world • new kind of learning • New Yorkpersonal developmentprofessional developmentreflect • revolutionary way to learn • Singapore • stay competitive • stay creative • Stockholmstudents • Stumholmen • Swedenworkplaceyoung talent

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2012

Plato Art Space: Ilhan Koman and Candas Sisman's 'Flux'

"Famous Turkish sculptor İlhan Koman's boat Hulda arrives in İstanbul, its final destination, after its long journey which began in Stockholm. Hulda was both Koman's home and studio during his residence in Stockholm.

The exhibition consists of the photographs and videos from Hulda's journey, 10 original sculptures such as Whirlpool and Dervish by İlhan Koman and a video –dedicated to İlhan Koman– by young artist Candaş Şişman. The photographs and videos are from the cities Hulda visited during its journey –Stockholm, Amsterdam, Bordeaux, Lisbon, Barcelona, Naples, Malta, Thessalonica and İstanbul. The exhibition in Plato Art Space is also the final leg of the activities of Hulda Festival (www.huldafestival.org).

The exhibition is also undertaking the mission of building a bridge between young generation artists and Koman by presenting Candaş Şişman's work. Şişman's video Flux is influenced by Koman's sculptures (Pi, Moebius, Whirlpool and Ogre) and is dedicated to İlhan Koman's inspiring art. The video has a sound design which is also inspired by the materials of Koman's sculptures and is produced by Candaş Şişman.

The exhibition is curated by Yıldırım Arıcı and accompanied by a reader (published by Plato College of Higher Education) and it is featuring texts by Çetin Kanra, Aykut Köksal, Abidin Dino, Ferit Edgü, Burcu Beşlioğlu and a poem by Oktay Rıfat. "

(Plato Art Space, İstanbul contemporary art)

Fig.1 "Flux", Candaş Şişman, Hulda Festival 21 September 2010 – 23 November 2010 İstanbul, Turkey.

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TAGS

20103D animation • Abidin Dino • abstractionAmsterdamanimated sculptureanimationarchitectural formsartistartwork • Aykut Koksal • Barcelona • Bordeaux • Burcu Beslioglu • Candas Sisman • Cetin Kanra • contemporary art • Dervish • design formalismexhibition • Ferit Edgu • generative artgeometry • Hulda • Hulda Festival • Ilhan Koman • Istanbulkinetic sculptureLisbonMaltamaterial moving in space • Moebius (sculpture) • morphNaples • Ogre (sculpture) • Oktay Rifat • Pi (sculpture) • Plato Art Space • Plato College of Higher Education • primitive logicprimitive shapessculptorsculpturesound designStockholm • Thessalonica • TurkeyTurkish media art • Whirlpool (sculpture) • Yildirim Arici

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2012

Wild Strawberries: expressionistic and Freudian dream sequences

"There are other Expressionist and certainly Freudian dream sequences in the picture, almost always with the old man appearing in them as his present self. And some of these, largely because so many have badly copied, now look a little self–conscious– arty even. But the film's ability to engage the emotions makes it notable for more than just technique.

One of the prime reasons is what can only be described as the transcendent performance of Victor Sjostrom as Professor Borg. Sjostrom was the great Swedish silent–era director, who died aged 80, not long after the film was completed and whose The Phantom Carriage had so influenced Bergman. It was he who made the final scene one of the most serene of all Bergman's endings. 'Sjostrom's face shone', said the director. 'It emanated light – a reflection of a different reality, hitherto absent. His whole appearance was soft and gentle, his glance joyful and tender. It was like a miracle'.

Later, Bergman admitted that the character of Borg was an attempt to justify himself to his own parents, but that Sjostrom had taken his text, made it his own and invested it with Sjostrom's often painful experiences. It is still, however, chiefly concerned with forgiveness between parents and children and the lost possibilities of youth."

(Derek Malcolm, 10 June 1999)

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1957 • carriage • clockcoffincorpsedeathdreamdream sequenceexpressionism • expressionist • expressionisticfilmfilm-maker • forgiveness • Freudian • hearse • in the mindIngmar Bergman • lamppost • lucid dreaming • Lund • medical scientist • mysteriousnightmareold manpainful experiencesphantompsychology • redemption • silent-era • somnambulistStockholmSwedishSwedish filmmaker • Victor Sjostrom • visual metaphorvisual spectaclewheelWild Strawberries (1957)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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