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Which clippings match 'Mimesis' keyword pg.1 of 2
29 OCTOBER 2013

Skeuomorphism has fallen out of favour in recent years

"Skeuomorphism has fallen out of favour in recent years, and is almost regarded as a dirty word by many in the design community. Apple this week announced a radical revision to the approach at its annual developer conference in California and its new mobile operating system will ditch real world visual metaphors in favour of a stripped–back minimalist approach. ... The podcast app recently lost its reel–to–reel tape deck look, a reference which would have been lost on many younger smartphone users. Not everyone will be pleased with the decision though, and some regret the decline of the skeuomorph."

(Sam Judah, 3 June 2013, BBC News Magazine)

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TAGS

Apple OS • binder • clipboard • de-facto symbol • desktop metaphor • envelope • golden compass • GUIinterface designinterface metaphor • jotting paper • leather-bound desk blotter • mimesismimicry • mobile operating system • nostalgic yearningoffice metaphorold-world equivalentsreal world objectsreal world visual metaphor • red wax seal • representational systemsresemblancescissorsskeuomorphskeuomorphic designskeuomorphismsoftware programme • sticky notes • trash canUIvisual metaphor • Windows 7

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2011

An interactive system defines a virtual space

"An interactive system defines a virtual space, whether the system's interface provides access to the inhospitable planet of Stroggos or the Microsoft Windows desktop. Users of both these systems interact with a place, one created by a computer and in which users and computational agents carry out their individual and collective activities. The intuitive and often–discussed benefit of a well–designed interface metaphor is that it allows users to carry over conventions from their 'real' experience when performing tasks within the interface world.

Another key and often unarticulated value of an interface arises from the interface's mimetic quality. While mimesis is often discussed by narrative theorists as a contrast to diegesis, distinguishing the concepts of showing versus telling (Aristotle), my emphasis here is to distinguish between an artifact that is intended to be an imitation of something, but is not really that thing and an artifact that is intended to be mistaken as that thing. An example of the former case would be a film of a fictional account of the D–Day landing on the beaches of Normandy. An example of the later might be a virtual reality system displaying photo–realistic graphical images of a physical space. D–Days stories like The Longest Day and Saving Private Ryan are, in some ways, imitations, and so are more mimetic than VR systems whose design is intended to '...produce synthetic images visually and measurably indistinguishable from real world images.' (Greenberg 1999)(pg. 45)."

(R. Michael Young, 1999)

Greenberg, D. P. 1999. 'A framework for realistic image synthesis'. Communications of the ACM 42(8):45–53.

1). R. Michael Young (1999). 'Notes on the Use of Plan Structures in the Creation of Interactive Plot', Papers from the 1999 Fall Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Symposium

TAGS

1999 • AAAI • AristotleAssociation for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence • computational agents • conventionsD-Day landingdesktop metaphordiegesis • Donald P. Greenberg • fictional account • graphical images • image synthesis • imitation of something • imitations • interact with a place • interactive narrative • interactive system • interface metaphor • interface world • intuitiveMicrosoft Windowsmimesis • mimetic quality • mistaken as that thing • narrative theory • Normandy • performing tasks • photo-realistic • physical space • real experience • real world images • realism • Saving Private Ryan • showing • stories • Stroggos • synthetic images • telling • The Longest Day • usersvirtual heritagevirtual realityvirtual reality systemvirtual space • VR systems • WWII

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2011

L.A. Noire brings actors' full performance to gaming

"With a technology called MotionScan, an actor's complete performance––their facial expressions, how they talk, when they blink––are captured for use in a video game. We spoke to Brendan McNamara, the head of the team behind the detective game using this tech, 'L.A. Noire.' ...

Made by Team Bondi and Rockstar––the AAA developer behind the violent and cinematic Grand Theft Auto series––L.A. Noire is set in post–WWII Los Angeles, giving the player the role of Cole Phelps (Mad Men's Aaron Staton), a war–hero turned police detective."

(Kevin Ohannessian, Fast Company, 4 February 2011)

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TAGS

3DaestheticsAustraliabelievability • Brendan McNamara • CGICGI actorscinematic • criminal investigation • detail • detective • detective storydigital actorsexpressionfacial animationfacial expressionsfacial nuancefidelityforensicsgamesgesturegraphic representationhyperrealismimitationimmersion • L.A. Noire • LA Noire • lifelikeLos Angeles • mannerism • micro expressionsmicroexpressionmimesismimicrymotion capture • MotionScan • murder mystery • nuance • performance capturepost-World War IIpuppetrealistic • Rockstar Games • story • Team Bondi • video gamevisual depictionvisual designvisual spectaclevisualisation • whodunit

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 AUGUST 2010

Shanghai Thames Town: A little piece of England in China

"Tucked away near the last stop of Line 9, the satellite settlement of Thames Town opened in 2006 as part of Shanghai's One City, Nine Towns program, with low–rise apartments and gated complexes designed to house 10,000 residents. Despite an intensive marketing effort (including a beauty pageant), the community failed to take off, and what's left is a ghost town –– and an ideal place for a quiet afternoon stroll.

As its name suggests, the design of Thames Town is inspired by England, with a main square, red telephone booths, streets named High, Oxford, and Queen and, of course, its very own man–made Thames river. If you start to lose yourself in your surroundings, worry not: images of Haibao have made it out here to reassure you that you are, in fact, still in Shanghai."

(Frances Woo, 22 January 2010, CNNGo.com)

Fig.1 Anthony Skriba. 27 April 2010. 'three separate wedding parties', stillgoingnative

Fig.2 Sarah Low, 2009. 'Boxing Day / China Trip: Day 10 and 11'

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TAGS

2006AlphavillearchitectureauthenticitycitycopyEngland • ersatzism • experience • folly • Haibao • mimesis • Nine Towns, One City • nostalgianoveltyPeoples Republic of Chinaplacereplicarepresentation • satellite settlement • Shanghaisimulation • Thames Town • theme parkUKurban planningurban simulationwedding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 DECEMBER 2009

Ceci n'est pas une pipe: undercutting our expectation about representation

"Doesn't a picture that declares, 'This is not a pipe,' undercut our expectation that representation will give us the thing – in this case, the pipe – itself? The difficulty it presents is no accident. Magritte was perhaps unique among the visual artists of this century in the depth of his philosophical lore. Another of his pipe dreams contains a depiction of a pipe on a blackboard under which 'This is not a pipe' is inscribed in a schoolmasterly hand. Floating above the blackboard Magritte depicts a kind of Platonic pipe. By virtue of its disproportionate size and free–floating dislocation, this utopian pipe is made to seem a mirage, while the depiction of a pipe, comfortably ensconced in its frame, enjoys a higher ontological dignity. The superficial contrast between the flat, two–dimensional blackboard pipe and the Platonic or transcendental overpipe is subverted, and it dawns on us that it is the picture of the pipe that we know, not the pipe in itself."

(Flint Schier, 23 January 1983, The New York Times)

Fig.1 La Trahison des images (Ceci n'est pas une pipe), 1929; Fig.2 René Magritte – Die zwei Mysterien, 1966, "Die Pfeife ist keine Pfeife", (Ceci n'est pas une Pipe)

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TAGS

19291983artartistBelgian • ceci nest pas une pipe • idealismmeta-paintingMichel FoucaultmimesispipePlatoRene Magritterepresentationrepresentational strategiessignificationsignifiedsignifier • this is not a pipe • truthvisual arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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