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Which clippings match 'MIDI' keyword pg.1 of 2
21 FEBRUARY 2014

MIDIDesaster plays Duke Nukem 64 intro on a dot matrix printer

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Atmel ATmega8circuit boardcomputer controlled musical instrumentcomputer printer • dot matrix printer • Duke Nukem • Duke Nukem 64 • Eye of the Tiger (1982) • Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) • Hysteria (2003) • impact matrix printer • MIDI • MIDIDesaster • music making technology • paper feed • print head • printer synth • Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) • sound generatorstepper motortechnology repurposingtheme musicuseless machinesWallace and Gromit

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 FEBRUARY 2014

Arduino controlled floppy drives play Somebody That I Used To Know

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Arduino • Arduino UNO • computer controlled musical instrument • controller programme • device • disk drive • floppy disk drive music • floppy disk drive orchestra • floppy drive • floppy music • Gigawipf • JavaMIDI • Moppy • music for floppy drivesmusic making technology • M_usical Fl_oppy • read/write headsSomebody That I Used To Know (song)technology repurposinguseless machineswhimsical interactions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JANUARY 2013

Machines replace humans: heavy metal robot 3-piece

"I'm impressed with Compressorhead – the three–piece robot band (three and a half if you count the little robot who drives one of the cymbals). I went to their website to see if I could discern the origins of the project, DIY, corporate, academic, or whatever and couldn't really find anything on the makers. Then I tracked down the drummer. Stickboy was created by Robocross Machines and a whimsical roboticist named Frank Barnes. ... Reminds me of the Survival Research Labs robot machines, built for public performance and disturbance."

(Maxwell Schnurer, 5 January 2013, Life of refinement)

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3-piece band • AC/DC • Ace of Spades • androidautomateautomationband • Compressorhead • computer controlled musical instrumentcybernetic artcymbals • disturbance • drummereffigyengineering • Frank Barnes • futuristic machinesGermanheavy metalhi-hathumanoid automatonindustrialisationkinetic automatonmachineman machinemechanism • metal band • MIDI • mohawke • Motorhead • musical instrumentplay • public performance • Robocross Machines • robot • robot band • robot machinesroboticrobotic artroboticistsimulationspeculative design • Stickboy • Survival Research Labs • TNT • whimsicalwhimsical interactions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2011

Gangpol und Mit: sonic & visual in love

"As a music and graphic duet, Gangpol und Mit works on a peculiar world of digital pop inhabited by colourful and geometrical characters – a bestiary that evolves in lysergic musicals and takes part in apocalyptic cartoons. In this project, music jumps from synth assaults and woody flute leads to mondo beats and cinematic harpsichord keys, with futuristic social songs wrapped in fake MIDI string quartet attempts. Meanwhile, on the visual side, salarymen dive into greasy food, call–center employees start a batucada, and computer motherboards are slaughtered on a wild island while some terrorist confettis explode everywhere."

(Gangpol und Mit, 29 Octobre 2011)

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Alpha-ville festivalanimationapocalyptic • batucada • bestiary • call-centre • cartooncharacter designcolourful characters • confetti • digital culturedigital popfakefuturistic • Gangpol und Mit • geometric • greasy food • lysergic • media artMIDI • mondo beats • motherboard • motion graphicsmusicsalarymansynthvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 OCTOBER 2010

The Internet of the 90's was bright, rich, personal, slow and under construction

"To be blunt [the Internet of the 90's] was bright, rich, personal, slow and under construction. It was a web of sudden connections and personal links. Pages were built on the edge of tomorrow, full of hope for a faster connection and a more powerful computer. One could say it was the web of the indigenous...or the barbarians. In any case, it was a web of amateurs soon to be washed away by dot.com ambitions, professional authoring tools and guidelines designed by usability experts.

I wrote that change was coming 'soon' instead of putting an end date at 1998, for example, because there was no sickness, death or burial. The amateur web didn't die and it has not disappeared but it is hidden. Search engine rating mechanisms rank the old amateur pages so low they're almost invisible and institutions don't collect or promote them with the same passion as they pursue net art or web design.

Also new amateur pages don't appear at such amounts as ten years ago because the WWW of today is a developed and highly regulated space. You wouldn't get on the web just to tell the world, 'Welcome to my home page.' The web has diversified, the conditions have changed and there's no need for this sort of old fashioned behaviour. Your CV is posted on the company website or on a job search portal. Your diary will be organised on a blog and your vacation photos are published on iPhoto. There's a community for every hobby and question.

This is why I refer to the amateur web as a thing of the past; aesthetically a very powerful past. Even people who weren't online in the last century, people who look no further than the first 10 search engine results can see the signs and symbols of the early web thanks to the numerous parodies and collections organised by usability experts who use the early elements and styles as negative examples."

(Olia Lialina, February 2005)

Fig.1 Cyndi Howells. 'Cyndi's Genealogy Home Page Construction Kit'

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1990s2005ad-hocaestheticsamateur • amateur pages • animated gifauthoring toolbox modeldesign for the screendesign formalismdesign historydigital culture • dot.com • experthistoryhome pageInternetmasterymedia artMIDInet artnew mediaOlia Lialinaparticipationpastiche • personal links • regulated space • regulationtransformationunder constructionusability • usability experts • usability guidelines • vernacularvisual communicationvisual designvisual languagevisual literacywebweb designweb vernacularwww

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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