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Which clippings match 'Microsoft' keyword pg.1 of 5
24 NOVEMBER 2013

PhoneGap: Adobe's mobile development framework

"Building applications for each device–iPhone, Android, Windows Mobile and more–requires different frameworks and languages. PhoneGap solves this by using standards–based web technologies to bridge web applications and mobile devices. Since PhoneGap apps are standards compliant, they're future–proofed to work with browsers as they evolve."

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TAGS

2012Adobe Systems IncAndroid OS • Apache Callback • Apache Cordova • Apache License • Apache Software Foundation (ASF)application developmentappsBlackBerry Ltdcross-platformCSS3 • device-specific languages • enabling technologiesHTML5 • hybrid code snippets • hybrid technologyIBMinteroperabilityiOS • iPhone application development • JavaJavaScriptMicrosoftmobile apps • mobile development framework • mobile devices • mobile platform • native code snippets • native device APIs • Nitobi Software • Objective-C • open frameworkopen source • open source framework • open source platform • PhoneGap • PhoneGap Deploy • platform independent • Research in Motion (RIM) • RIM • SDKsoftware deploymentsoftware framework • software wrapper • standardisationstandards compliantstandards-based web technologiesweb application developmentweb standardsweb technologiesWindows Mobile

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2012

Welcome to the Era of Design

"All businesses, no matter what they make or sell, should recognize the power and financial value of good design.

Obviously, there are many different types of design: graphic, brand, packaging, product, process, interior, interaction/user experience, Web and service design, to name but a few. ...

You see, expecting great design is no longer the preserve of a picky design–obsessed urban elite – that aesthetically sensitive clique who'd never dare leave the house without their Philippe Starck eyewear and turtleneck sweaters and buy only the right kind of Scandinavian furniture. Instead, there's a new, mass expectation of good design: that products and services will be better thought through, simplified, made more intuitive, elegant and more enjoyable to use.

Design has finally become democratized, and we marketers find ourselves with new standards to meet in this new 'era of design.' To illustrate, Apple, the epitome of a design–led organization, now has a market capitalization of $570 billion, larger than the GDP of Switzerland. Its revenue is double Microsoft's, a similar type of technology organization but one not truly led by design (just compare Microsoft Windows with Apple's Lion operating system)."

(Adam Swann, 5/03/2012, Forbes)

Fig.1 "Mille Miglia" bicycle by VIVA [http://www.vivabikes.com/].

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TAGS

advertisingaestheticsAmazon.comApple • Apple Care • applied discipline • B2Bbrandbrandingbrandsbusiness • business to business • CMO Network • competitive advantagecreativity • customer recommendation • customer satisfaction • customer-centric • customersdesign • design-led organisation • elegant design • employee satisfaction • enjoyable to use • era of design • experience design • feel good • financial value • First Direct • Forbesgood designgraphic designhyperconnectedIKEAinnovative designinteraction designinterior designintuitive designleadership • led by design • marketer • marketingmeaningful experiences • Michael Eisner • MicrosoftMicrosoft Windows • new era • new standardsoperating systempackagingPhilippe StarckPinterest • process design • product design • rewarding experiences • service design • service touchpoints • social media • social-media-fueled society • Switzerland • urban elite • user experience designweb design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2012

Pictures Under Glass: sacrificing tactile richness

"As it happens, designing Future Interfaces For The Future used to be my line of work. I had the opportunity to design with real working prototypes, not green screens and After Effects, so there certainly are some interactions in the video which I'm a little skeptical of, given that I've actually tried them and the animators presumably haven't. But that's not my problem with the video.

My problem is the opposite, really – this vision, from an interaction perspective, is not visionary. It's a timid increment from the status quo, and the status quo, from an interaction perspective, is actually rather terrible. ...

I'm going to talk about that neglected third factor, human capabilities. What people can do. Because if a tool isn't designed to be used by a person, it can't be a very good tool, right? ...

Do you see what everyone is interacting with? The central component of this Interactive Future? It's there in every photo! That's right! – HANDS. And that's great! I think hands are fantastic! Hands do two things. They are two utterly amazing things, and you rely on them every moment of the day, and most Future Interaction Concepts completely ignore both of them. Hands feel things, and hands manipulate things.

Go ahead and pick up a book. Open it up to some page. Notice how you know where you are in the book by the distribution of weight in each hand, and the thickness of the page stacks between your fingers. Turn a page, and notice how you would know if you grabbed two pages together, by how they would slip apart when you rub them against each other.

Go ahead and pick up a glass of water. Take a sip. Notice how you know how much water is left, by how the weight shifts in response to you tipping it.

Almost every object in the world offers this sort of feedback. It's so taken for granted that we're usually not even aware of it. Take a moment to pick up the objects around you. Use them as you normally would, and sense their tactile response – their texture, pliability, temperature; their distribution of weight; their edges, curves, and ridges; how they respond in your hand as you use them.

There's a reason that our fingertips have some of the densest areas of nerve endings on the body. This is how we experience the world close–up. This is how our tools talk to us. The sense of touch is essential to everything that humans have called 'work' for millions of years.

Now, take out your favorite Magical And Revolutionary Technology Device. Use it for a bit. What did you feel? Did it feel glassy? Did it have no connection whatsoever with the task you were performing?

I call this technology Pictures Under Glass. Pictures Under Glass sacrifice all the tactile richness of working with our hands, offering instead a hokey visual facade."

(Bret Victor, 8 November 2011)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JULY 2011

Chris O'Shea @ Nottingham GameCityNights Episode 6

"Headlining Episode 6 is artist and designer Chris O'Shea, known internationally for his immersive, interactive multimedia work. Using Microsoft's Kinect, Chris will be talking us through the melding of videogames and play into contemporary art, with demonstrations of his previous and current projects."

(GameCityNights, 24 June 2011)

Fig.1 Chris O'Shea (2010). "Air Guitar prototype"

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TAGS

2011 • 3D skeletal tracking • air guitar • applied research • artist and designer • artistic practiceBritish artistChris OSheaconceptualisationcorrelative analoguedesign researchdesign researcherdesignerdevice • Dr Sketchy • experimentationGameCity • GameCityNights • gamesgraphic representationguitarGuitar Hero • hand tracking • high-fidelity prototypehistogramimmersiveinteraction designinteractive multimediainteractive music gamesKinect • LibFreenect • MicrosoftNottingham • OfxKinect • OpenCVOpenFrameworks • OpenKinect • OpenNI • playingpractice-ledprototyperesearch project • Rock Band • speculative designtheory buildingUKusabilityvideogames and playvisualisationXbox Kinect

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2011

Video for Wikipedia: Guide to Best Practices

"This new effort takes advantage of a movement toward open video – a movement that has its roots in the free software movement that is largely powering the web today and which, through companies such as Apache, IBM, Mozilla, Oracle and Red Hat, has resulted in trillions of dollars of value creation for the stakeholders involved. The open or open–source video movement recognizes the contributions from, but also the limitations inherent in, the video work of industry leaders such as Adobe, Apple, and Microsoft. Flash, Quicktime, Windows Media and Silverlight are handsome technologies. But they have been developed and controlled by commercial companies that often protect themselves against innovations by outside coders, designers, developers, programmers – technologists, lawyers, producers, and educators keen to move away from proprietary solutions that are delivered for the benefit of shareholders first and the billions of everyday people who connect via the web a pale second.

The open video movement recognizes the importance of rights and licensing strategies designed to create profit or serve national interests, but it is critical of systems that prohibit access to film and sound assets becoming part of our collective audiovisual canon. Many film and sound resources digitized for preservation, for example, do not appear online because of dated copyright rules; and some of the great investments (millions of dollars in fact) by, for example, the U.K. government in film and sound resource digitization result in materials being put online only behind educational and national paywalls that keep students in Nairobi and Nashville from using London–based resources in their work.

Enabling video to catch up to the open–source movement on the web goes to the heart of our efforts to improve our understanding of the world. The central technologies of the web – HTML, HTTP, and TCP/IP – are open for all to build upon and improve, and video's future should be similarly unobstructed."

(Peter B. Kaufman, 2010)

Fig.1 Kid Kameleon, CC BY SA NC

2). Video for Wikipedia and the Open Web October 2010 An Intelligent Television White Paper PETER B. KAUFMAN INTELLIGENT TELEVISION WWW.INTELLIGENTTELEVISION.COM THE OPEN VIDEO ALLIANCE Version 1.0

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TAGS

2010AdobeAdobe FlashApache Software Foundation (ASF)AppleaudiovisualBBC archiveBritish Film InstituteBritish Governmentcontent rightscopyrightcopyright rulesdigitisation • educational paywalls • film resources • free software movement • HTML • HTTP • IBMinnovationLibrary of Congress • licensing strategies • media resources • MicrosoftMITMozillaNairobi • Nashville • national paywalls • open sourceopen video • open-source movement • open-source video movement • Oracle Corporation • ownership • paywall • preservation • proprietary solutions • proprietary technologiesQuickTime • Red Hat (Linux) • remix cultureSilverlightsound resources • U.S. National Archives • value creationWikipedia • Windows Media • Yale University

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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