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Which clippings match 'Humans And Machines' keyword pg.1 of 1
26 SEPTEMBER 2014

Rethinking Intermediality in the Digital Age

"In the past decades 'intermediality' has proved to be one of the most productive terms in the domain of humanities. Although the ideas regarding media connections may be traced back to the poetics of the Romantics or even further back in time, it was the accelerated multiplication of media themselves becoming our daily experience in the second half of the twentieth century that propelled the term to a wide attention in a great number of fields (communication and cultural studies, philosophy, theories of literature and music, art history, cinema studies, etc.) where it generated an impressive number of analyses and theoretical discussions. 'Intermediality is in' ('Intermedialität ist in'), declared one of its pioneering theorists, Joachim Paech, at the end of the 1990s. However, we may also note, that since then other theoretical approaches introduced even newer perspectives that have not only revitalized the study of media phenomena in general but have specifically targeted the emerging new problematics raised by the new electronic media. Facing the challenge of the daily experiences of the digital age, discussions of media differences or 'dialogues' highlighting the 'inter,' the 'gap,' the 'in–between,' the 'incommensurability' between media are currently being replaced by discourses of the 'enter' or 'immersion,' and the 'network logic' of a 'convergence culture' in which we have a 'free flow of content over different media platforms' (Henry Jenkins). At the same time the turn towards the corporeality of perception in all aspects of communication has also shifted the attention from the 'interaction of media' towards the 'interaction with media,' from the idea of 'media borders' towards the analysis of the blurring of perception between media and reality, of humans and machines – media being perceived more and more not as a form of representation but as an environment and as a means to 'augment' reality."

The inaugural conference of ISIS (International Society for Intermedial Studies / former NorSIS) Cluj–Napoca, October 24–26, 2013. Conference venue: Sapientia University, Calea Turzii nr. 4.

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TAGS

2013 • augment reality • augmented reality • between media • Cluj-Napoca • convergence culture • corporeality of perception • digital age • discussions of media differences • emerging new problematics • form of representation • Henry Jenkinshumans and machinesimmersion • incommensurability • interaction of media • interaction with media • intermediality • International Society for Intermedial Studies • Joachim Paech • Marie-Laure Ryan • media and reality • media borders • media phenomena • media platforms • multiple delivery platforms • multiplication of media • narrative theory • network logic • new electronic media • Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvaniatransmedia storytelling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2012

Irony and Utopia: History of Computer Art

"Some pioneers of VR technology, including Brenda Laurel and Jaron Lanier, have been among its principal exponents, suggesting that the creation of virtual worlds and of shared cyberspaces will have revolutionary social consequences and allow hitherto unimagined forms of human expression. Such a view is echoed in the work of academic theorists like Donna Haraway and Alluquere Rosanne Stone, who believe that advanced information technologies may have radical political consequences, an idea which they pursue through the image of cyborgs which blur the distinction between humans and machines. These ideas can also be found in the use of VR as a theme in youth culture, for example the cyberpunk nightclubs and cafes in London and San Francisco. Here too, we find an agenda for cultural and political change, in this case, again, premised on innovations in human–machine interface technologies."

(Ralph Schroeder, 1994, pp.519–528)

2). Ralph Schroeder (1994). "Cyberculture, cyborg post–modernism and the sociology of virtual reality technologies: surfing the soul in the information age", Futures 1994 26(5) 519–528 (from a reading list created by Beau Sievers for the lecture series titled "Irony and Utopia: History of Computer Art" at the Bruce High Quality Foundation University).

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TAGS

1994 • advanced information technologies • Alluquere Rosanne Stone • BHQFU • Brenda Laurelcomputer artcultural and political changecyberculturecyberpunk • cyberpunk nightclubs • cyborgDonna HarawayHCI • history of computer art • human expression • human-machine interface technologies • humans and machinesinformation ageirony • Jaron Lanier • Londonman machinepostmodernism • radical political consequences • Ralph Schroeder • San Francisco • shared cyberspaces • social consequencestechnology innovation • unimagined forms of human expression • utopiavirtual realityvirtual reality technologiesvirtual worldsVR • VR technology • youth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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