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Which clippings match 'Cultural And Political Change' keyword pg.1 of 1
31 DECEMBER 2012

The Value of Culture: Culture and Anarchy

"Melvyn Bragg presents the first in a series of programmes examining the idea of culture and its evolution over the last 150 years. In 1869 the poet and critic Matthew Arnold published Culture and Anarchy, a series of essays in which he argued passionately that culture – 'the best which has been thought and said' – was a powerful force for good. In this first programme Melvyn Bragg visits the Sheldonian Theatre in Oxford, where Arnold first unveiled his ideas on the subject, and discovers how Arnold's ideas were refined and rejected by later thinkers."

(Melvyn Bragg, 2012)

Matthew Arnold (1869). "Culture and Anarchy: An Essay in Political and Social Criticism" [http://www.authorama.com/book/culture–and–anarchy.html].

"The Value of Culture: Culture and Anarchy", Radio broadcast, Episode 1 of 5, Duration: 42 minutes, First broadcast: Monday 31 December 2012, Presenter/Melvyn Bragg, Producer/Thomas Morris for the BBC Radio 4, UK.

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TAGS

1869 • 2012access to learning • arriviste • BBC Radio 4cultural and political changecultural changecultural historycultural valuecultureCulture and Anarchy • force for good • high culturehistory of ideas • ideas refined and rejected by later thinkers • Matthew ArnoldMelvyn Braggpopular culture • proliferation of universities • radio broadcast • red brick status • red brick university • redbrick universityRussell Group • series of essays • Sheldonian Theatre in Oxford • the idea of culture • The Value of Culture (radio) • Thomas Morris • university education • university status

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2012

Irony and Utopia: History of Computer Art

"Some pioneers of VR technology, including Brenda Laurel and Jaron Lanier, have been among its principal exponents, suggesting that the creation of virtual worlds and of shared cyberspaces will have revolutionary social consequences and allow hitherto unimagined forms of human expression. Such a view is echoed in the work of academic theorists like Donna Haraway and Alluquere Rosanne Stone, who believe that advanced information technologies may have radical political consequences, an idea which they pursue through the image of cyborgs which blur the distinction between humans and machines. These ideas can also be found in the use of VR as a theme in youth culture, for example the cyberpunk nightclubs and cafes in London and San Francisco. Here too, we find an agenda for cultural and political change, in this case, again, premised on innovations in human–machine interface technologies."

(Ralph Schroeder, 1994, pp.519–528)

2). Ralph Schroeder (1994). "Cyberculture, cyborg post–modernism and the sociology of virtual reality technologies: surfing the soul in the information age", Futures 1994 26(5) 519–528 (from a reading list created by Beau Sievers for the lecture series titled "Irony and Utopia: History of Computer Art" at the Bruce High Quality Foundation University).

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TAGS

1994 • advanced information technologies • Alluquere Rosanne Stone • BHQFU • Brenda Laurelcomputer artcultural and political changecyberculturecyberpunk • cyberpunk nightclubs • cyborgDonna HarawayHCI • history of computer art • human expression • human-machine interface technologies • humans and machinesinformation ageirony • Jaron Lanier • Londonman machinepostmodernism • radical political consequences • Ralph Schroeder • San Francisco • shared cyberspaces • social consequencestechnology innovation • unimagined forms of human expression • utopiavirtual realityvirtual reality technologiesvirtual worldsVR • VR technology • youth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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