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Which clippings match '1995' keyword pg.1 of 5
13 APRIL 2017

Sonic Outlaws Documentary (1995)

"Sonic Outlaws, a fragmented, gleefully anarchic documentary by Craig Baldwin, approaches this incident from several directions. Some of the film is about the legal nightmare that ensued from Negativland's little joke. In a highly publicized case, U2's label, Island Records, charged Negativland with copyright and trademark infringement for appropriating the letter U and the number 2, even though U2 had in turn borrowed its name from the Central Intelligence Agency. SST then dropped Negativland, suppressed the record and demanded that the group pay legal fees. Trying to remain solvent, Negativland sent out a barrage of letters and legal documents that are now collected in 'Fair Use', an exhaustive, weirdly fascinating scrapbook about the case.

Sonic Outlaws covers some of the same territory while also expanding upon the ideas behind Negativland's guerilla recording tactics. Guerilla is indeed the word, since these and other appropriation artists see themselves as engaged in real warfare, inundated by the commercial airwaves, infuriated by the propaganda content of much of what they hear and see, these artists strike back by rearranging contexts as irreverently as possible. Their technological capabilities are awesome enough to mean no sound or image is tamper-proof today."

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1995 • Alan Korn • anarchic documentary • appropriation art • appropriation artist • audio collage • Bill Daniel • billboard bandit • bone-dry educational film • Casey Kasem • cellular phone scanner • Chris Grigg • commercial airwaves • copyright infringement • Craig Baldwin • cultural criticismculture jamming • David Wills • documentary collage • Don Joyce • Doug Kahnfair usefound footage • guerilla recording tactics • guerrilla tactics • independent rock band • John Heck • John Oswald • Josh Pearson • Linda Morgan Brown • Lloyd Dunn • Lone Ranger • Mark Hosler • media jammer • media piracy • media recontextualisation • multimedia plagiarism • music samplingNegativland • noise maker • Paul Neff • pirated audiotape • public information film • Public Works Productions • Ralph Johnson • recontextualisation • Richard Lyons • Roger CormanRonald Reagan • sample based artist • sampled music • satirical samplings • Silly Putty • sly commentary • Sonic Outlaws Documentary (1995) • stealing ideas • subversive fun • tape music • Tape-Beatles • trademark infringement • U-2 spy plane • U2 (band) • video collage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

19th Kalamata International Dance Festival

The Kalamata International Dance Festival began in 1995 to promote dance and showcase the work of talented Greek and international choreographers.

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1995artistic expressionchoreographycontemporary arts • contemporary dance • contemporary dance festival • dance • dance festival • festivalGreece • Kalamata International Dance Festival • performanceperforming arts • Qudus Onikeku • Rachid Ouramdane • showcase • Ultima Vex • Vicky Marangopouloy • Wim Vandekeybus

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 APRIL 2013

The idiomatic paradigm of user interface design

"This third method of user interface design solves the problems of both of the previous two. I call it idiomatic because it is based on the way we learn and use idioms, or figures of speech, like 'beat around the bush' or 'cool.' They are easily understood but not in the same way metaphors are. There is no bush and nobody is beating anything. We understand the idiom because we have learned it and because it is distinctive. Pretty simple, huh? This is where the human mind is really outstanding, mastering learning and remembering idioms very easily without having to depend on comparing them to known situations or understanding how they work. It has to, because most idioms don't have any metaphoric meaning at all. Most of the controls on a GUI interface are idioms. Splitters, winders, comboboxes and scrollbars are things we learn idiomatically rather than intuit metaphorically.

We tend to think that learning is hard because of the conditioning we have from the technology paradigm. Those old user interfaces were very hard to learn because you also had to understand how they worked. Most of what we know we learn without understanding; things like faces, social interactions, attitudes, the arrangement of rooms and furniture in our houses and offices. We don't 'understand' why someone's face is composed the way it is, but we 'know' their face. We recognize it because we have looked at it and memorized it, and it wasn't that difficult.

The familiar mouse is not metaphoric of anything but rather is learned idiomatically. That scene in Star Trek IV where Scotty returns to twentieth–century Earth and tries to speak into a mouse is one of the few parts of that movie that is not fiction. There is nothing about the mouse that indicates its purpose or use, nor is it comparable to anything else in our experience, so learning it is not intuitive. However, learning to point at things with a mouse is incredibly easy. Someone probably spent all of three seconds showing it to you your first time, and you mastered it from that instant on. We don't know or care how mice work and yet we can operate them just fine. That is idiomatic learning.

The key observation about idioms is that although they must be learned, good ones only need to be learned once. It is quite easy to learn idioms like 'cool' or 'politically correct' or 'kick the bucket' or 'the lights are on but nobody's home' or 'in a pickle' or 'inside the beltway' or 'take the red–eye' or 'grunge.' The human mind is capable of picking up an idiom like one of the above from a single hearing. It is similarly easy to learn idioms like checkboxes, radiobuttons, pushbuttons, close boxes, pulldown menus, buttcons, tabs, comboboxes, keyboards, mice and pens.

This idea of taking a simple action or symbol and imbuing it with meaning is familiar to marketing professionals. Synthesizing idioms is the essence of product branding, whereby a company takes a product or company name and imbues it with a desired meaning. Tylenol is a meaningless word, an idiom, but the McNeil company has spent millions to make you associate that word with safe, simple, trustworthy pain relief. Of course, idioms are visual, too. The golden arches of MacDonalds, the three diamonds of Mitsubishi, the five interlocking rings of the Olympics, even Microsoft's flying window are non–metaphoric idioms that are instantly recognizable and imbued with common meaning.

Ironically, much of the familiar GUI baggage often thought to be metaphoric is actually idiomatic. Such artifacts as window close boxes, resizable windows, infinitely nested file folders and clicking and dragging are non–metaphoric operations–they have no parallel in the real world. They derive their strength only from their easy idiomatic learnability."

(Alan Cooper, 1995)

Alan Cooper (1995). "The Myth of Metaphor", Visual Basic Programmer's Journal.

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1995 • click and drag • cognitive map • combo box • computer mouseconceptual modelfigure of speechgraphical user interfaceGUI • hard to learn • human-computer interactionidiom • idiomatic • idiomatic learnability • idiomatic learning • idioms • imbued with meaning • interface designinterface metaphor • known situations • learned behaviour • learning and remembering • meaning making • nested file structure • no parallel in the real world • non-metaphoric idioms • non-metaphoric operationsn • pulldown menu • pushbutton • radiobutton • resizable window • scrollbar • synthesizing idioms • tabbed browsing • technology paradigm • user interface design • user interfaces • widget

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JUNE 2012

UK Times Higher Education: education news and resources

"Times Higher Education is the UK's most authoritative source of information about higher education. Designed specifically for professional people working in higher education and research, Times Higher Education was founded in 1971 and has been online since 1995.

We cover policy issues and intellectual developments worldwide through a specialist staff of reporters and many contributors from within the academic community. Times Higher Education provides high–quality information and analysis as well as a forum for debate for the academic community on higher education policy issues – public funding, tuition charges, quality assurance, institutional governance, student assessment, postgraduate training etc – and on intellectual developments, personalities and debates. Coverage includes a large number of book reviews of both specialised texts and books of general interest to an academic audience."

(TSL Education Ltd.)

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19711995 • academic audience • academic community • authoritative source • book reviews • collegescoveragedebateseducation • education news • education resources • educational resources • forum for debate • HE statistics • high-quality analysis • high-quality informationhigher education • higher education policy • institutional governance • intellectual developments • magazinepersonalities • policy issues • postgraduate training • public funding • quality assurancequantitative dataquantitative information • specialised texts • statistics • student assessment • THETHESTimes Higher EducationTimes Higher Education Supplement • TSL Education Ltd • tuition charges • tuition feesUKuniversities • university jobs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 APRIL 2012

LycetteBros: revisting Not My Type

"The Not My Type animation series was primarily produced for distribution on the internet. Set in an office, the Not My Type series explores the various relationships within. While avoiding the use of language and dialogue, Not My Type, takes various typographic faces, symbols and characters and then duplicates, distorts and moves them to create a simple, stylistic production.

The initial version was created using Macromedia Director in 1995 (while John was at University) and was then recreated in 2000 for internet distribution using Flash – which was a perfect fit for a font based, primarily black & white animation. Not My Type I was so well received that another episode soon followed, culminating in four episodes by the end of 2002."

(John and Mark Lycette)

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TAGS

1995200020022D animationAdobe Flashanimated episodesanimationanimation seriesAustraliablack and white • distribution on the internet • episodesexpressive typographyfonts • internet distribution • John LycetteLycette BrosMacromedia DirectorMark LycettemuteNot My Typeoffice settingshort film • stylistic production • typetypeface personalitiestypographic characterstypographic faces • typographic symbols • typography

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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