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Which clippings match '2016' keyword pg.2 of 4
17 NOVEMBER 2016

When Nigel Farage met Donald Trump

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2016Brexit • childish • Donald Trumpface swaphead replacementhumour • Hunter Tirpak • informal alliance • mash-upNigel FarageparodyPennsylvaniapolitician caricaturepower relationspuppetRepublicanrepurposingright-wingsatirical illustration • Tiny Farage • Tiny Trump • UK EU membership referendumvideo compositingVladimir Putin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 OCTOBER 2016

HyperNormalisation: our retreat into a simplified version of the world

"The documentary is inspired by the unpredictable events of recent times – from the rise of Donald Trump to Brexit, the war in Syria, the endless migrant crisis, and random bomb attacks. It seeks to explain both why these chaotic events are happening, and why we and our leaders can't understand them. Curtis's theory is that Westerners - politicians, journalists, experts and members of the public alike - have retreated into a simplified, and often completely fake version of the world. But because it is all-encompassing, we accept it as normal.

HyperNormalisation explores this hollow world by looking back at 40 years of events, and profiling a diverse cast of characters such as: the Assad dynasty, Donald Trump, Henry Kissinger, Patti Smith, the early performance artists in New York, President Putin, intelligent machines, Japanese gangsters and suicide bombers."

(Holly Barrett, 22nd September 2016, Royal Television Society)

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20169/11 • Acid Phreak (pseudonym) • Adam CurtisAfghanistan • AirBnB • Alexei Yurchak • Anthony GiddensArab Spring • Arkady Strugatsky • BBC documentary • BBC iPlayer • Boris Strugatsky • Brexit • British filmmaker • British National Front • Carl Rogers • cartoon villain • chaos • chaotic events • chatbot • civil rights movement • Corrupt (pseudonym) • cyber activism • cyberspace • Damascus • David Frost • Declaration of Independence in Cyberspace • delusion • digital rightsdisruptive innovationdocumentaryDonald Trump • Eli Ladopoulos • ELIZA (natural language processing) • fakeness • functioning society • Gulf War • HAC (pseudonym) • Hafez al-Assad • Henry Kissinger • hippies • hypernormalisation • HyperNormalisation (2016) • intelligent machines • internet utopianismIraq • John Barlow • John Lee • Joseph Weizenbaum • Judea Pearl • Julio Fernandez • late communist period • Lester Coleman • liability theory • Lionel Ritchie • machine fetishisation • Mark Abene • Martha Rosler • Masters of Deception (MOD) • migrant crisis • Muammar Gaddafi • Muslim Brotherhood • New YorkNigel FarageOccupy Wall Street • Outlaw (pseudonym) • paradoxPatti Smith • Paul Stira • performance artists • Phiber Optik (pseudonym) • powerlesspretence • random bomb attacks • retreat into simplified views of the world • Roadside Picnic (1972) • Ronald Reagan • Royal Television Society • Scorpion (pseudonym) • self-absorbed baby boomers • self-fulfilling prophecy • Soviet UnionStalker (1979)suicide bombersSyria • Tahir Square • techno-panic • techno-utopiaterrorism • time of great uncertainty • Timothy LearyTron • Uber • Vladimir PutinVladislav Surkov • War in Syria • Yakuza

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 OCTOBER 2016

Debate duets: Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump serenade each other

"The second US presidential debate was characterised by levels of vitriol never before seen on the US political stage.

But while millions of viewers across the world watched in horror as the Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton bloodied themselves over the Trump tapes, Clinton emails, tax, Syria and Obamacare, others saw the opportunity for humour.

Enter the memes.

The combination of microphones and roaming candidates, aided by the town hall-style of the debate in St Louis, proved fertile ground for imagining an alternate reality – one where Clinton and Trump were serenading each other.

As the debate ground on the #debatesongs hashtag spawned memes of the pair singing along to duets from Frozen, Grease and – probably most memorably – Dirty Dancing."

(Bonnie Malkin, 11 October 2016, Guardian Unlimited)

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2016 • Bill Medley • culture jammingdebateDonald Trump • duets • Guardian UnlimitedHillary Clintonhumour • Jennifer Warnes • LuckyTV • mash-upparody • presidential debate • re-purposeremixrepurposing • Time of my life (1987)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2016

Cassetteboy vs The Snoopers' Charter

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2016Cassetteboycollaged togetherConservative partycut-upcut-up techniquedata securityDavid CameronEvery Breath You Take (song)information privacy • Investigatory Powers Bill • Mark Bolton • mash-uppersonal datapoliticianprivacy policy • privacy protection • re-editre-purposeremix culturesnoopers charter • snooping • social commentary • Steve Warlin • The Police (band) • Theresa MayUK • UK politics • use of private information

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JUNE 2016

The Materiality of Research: 'Woven into the Fabric of the Text: Subversive Material Metaphors in Academic Writing'

"In the social sciences, though, often we write about our research as if theories and arguments are buildings. Theories have frameworks and foundations and they need support. Arguments can be constructed, shored up by facts and buttressed with a solid line of reasoning. Sometimes they can be shaky and even fall down. But as well as communicating what we mean, metaphors structure our thinking. Or, at least, the metaphors we choose when we write can reveal a great deal about underlying assumptions. The theories-as-buildings metaphor always makes me imagine an enormous wall made of rectangular bricks, orderly and straight, progressing upwards and onwards. The researcher's job is to climb the scaffolding, find a gap near the top and make a brick to fill it, or to knock a few crumbling bricks out and replace them with others, strong and freshly fired. Or rarely, to grab a spade and start digging a new foundation, because this metaphor doesn't work like Minecraft: bricks can't float, unsupported.

Why does this way of thinking about knowledge hold such sway over us? For one thing, it offers a comforting sense of progress and control. Buildings have blueprints; their construction appears to proceed in a predictable fashion; engineers can calculate precisely where the load bearing walls and lintels need to be; construction workers know how to mix the mortar so it won't crumble. Making buildings is also something that happens in the public sphere; even with houses, the insides only become private when the work is finished and people move in. And though we all know full well that knowledge creation doesn't actually happen in the controlled and predictable way the metaphor implies, this is the structure that it imposes on our writing: an activity that is orderly, involves rationality over emotion and inhabits the public sphere not the private."

(Katie Collins, 27 May 2016)

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TAGS

2016academic writingaffordances • building metaphors • conceptual metaphorcreative practicecultural practicesfeminine voice • generative practice • integrative practices • Katie Collins • material metaphors • metaphors structure our thinking • needlecraft metaphors • piecing together • predictable fashion • progress narrativesresearch activitiesresearchersewingsocial sciencestitching • theories-as-buildings metaphor • theory building • thinking about knowledge • underlying assumptions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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