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20 SEPTEMBER 2013

The Mass Observation Archive: a UK social history writing project

"The Mass Observation Project (MOP) is a unique UK–based writing project which has been running since 1981. ... [it] differs from other similar social investigations because of its historical link to the original Mass Observation and because of its focus is on voluntary, self–motivated participation. It revives the early Mass Observation notion that everyone can participate in creating their own history or social science. The Mass Observers do not constitute a statistically representative sample of the population but can be seen as reporters or 'citizen journalists' who provide a window on their worlds.

The material is solicited in response to 'directives' or open–ended questions sent to them by post or email three times a year. The directives contain two or three broad themes which cover both very personal issues and wider political and social issues and events.

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TAGS

1937198120th century21st century • Charles Madge • citizen journalismconfessioncultural heritagediagramdiary • directives • drawingseventseveryday lifehistorical archiveshistorical chronicles • Humphrey Jennings • letterslistlongitudinal studymapMass Observation Project (MOP)material culture • memoir • open-ended questionsopinion • ordinary people • personal experiencephotographsplacespolitical issuesposterity • press cutting • qualitative researchresearch resourcesself knowledge • self-identity • self-revelationsocial historysocial issuessocial researchstatistically representative samplestoriessubjectivitytheir storiesthematic patterns • Tom Harrisson • UK • University of Sussex • voluntary participationwriting project

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 FEBRUARY 2012

The Confluence of Digital Journalism and Digital Humanities

"I've increasingly felt that digital journalism and digital humanities are kindred spirits, and that more commerce between the two could be mutually beneficial. That sentiment was confirmed by the extremely positive reaction on Twitter to a brief comment I made on the launch of Knight–Mozilla OpenNews, including from Jon Christensen (of the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford, and formerly a journalist), Shana Kimball (MPublishing, University of Michigan), Tim Carmody (Wired), and Jenna Wortham (New York Times).

Here's an outline of some of the main areas where digital journalism and digital humanities could profitably collaborate. It's remarkable, upon reflection, how much overlap there now is, and I suspect these areas will only grow in common importance."

(Dan Cohen's Digital Humanities Blog)

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TAGS

academic disciplinesarchive • archivists • audiencebig data • blog posts • common platforms • common tools • communication platformconfluence • content management systems • convergencecrowdsourcingcultural technologyDan Cohen • data standards • developersdigital humanitiesdigital journalismdigital media • digital research • disciplinary fields • DocumentCloud • Drupal • high-quality writing • historical archivesinfrastructureJenna Wortham • Jon Christensen • journalism • Kindle Singles • Knight Foundation • Knight-Mozilla OpenNews • librarians • long-form journalism • Mozilla • MPublishing • museum professionals • New York Times • news organisations • novel functionality • Omeka • open source softwareopen web • OpenNews • platformsprimary sources • pro-am • Shana Kimball • short-form scholarship • social mediasoftware developersStanford University • techies • technologists • Tim Carmody • TwitterUniversity of Michiganweb standardsWired (magazine)WordPress • writers and researchers • Zotero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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