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Which clippings match 'Sexualisation' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 JULY 2014

A Feminist Analysis of the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty

Abstract: "Drawing from several areas of research, this thesis explores the ways in which Dove's Campaign for Real Beauty appropriates feminist themes to sell beauty products, to the detriment of female consumers. Advertising and marketing have long held the power to create, shape, and reinforce cultural norms, and for years, advertisers have been able to propagate and strengthen gender stereotypes. Though there has been a push since the late 1990s to stem the flow of sexist and potentially dangerous advertising messages about women's bodies, ads still disseminate harmful messages that contribute to the further sexualization and oppression of women in the United States. Dove is just one of the many female–targeted brands that claim to hold progressive, woman–positive ideals, while still selling products intended to make women more beautiful–supposedly the ultimate goal for any modern female. While the campaign professes a desire to increase confidence and self–esteem for women and girls around the globe, it promotes a post–feminist, consumerist agenda that actually reinforces what Naomi Wolf titled 'the beauty myth'. Linguistic and visual analyses of Dove's print and viral marketing tactics within the contexts of advertising, feminism, and consumer culture reveal that instead of 'redefining' beauty, the Dove campaign is, in actuality, reinforcing decades–old ideology about women's appearance and status in society."

(Caitlin McCleary, 2014)

McCleary, Caitlin M., "A Not–So–Beautiful Campaign: A Feminist Analysis of the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty" (2014). University of Tennessee Honors Thesis Projects. http://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_chanhonoproj/1691

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TAGS

2013advertising campaignanxietyappropriationbeauty industrybeauty productsbody imageco-optionconsumer culturecultural normsdepictions of womendissertationDove (brand) • Dove Real Beauty Sketches (2013) • drawingemotional responseemotive manipulationempowerment themeevocative advertisingfemale consumerfemale-targeted brandsfeminist analysisfeminist themesgender stereotypesgendered brands • honours thesis • marketing campaign • Naomi Wolf • physical appearancepost-feminist agenda • real beauty • Real Beauty (campaign) • redefining beauty • self-criticism • self-esteemself-perceptionsexualisation • sketch artist • sketching • The Beauty Myth (1990) • Unilever • University of Tennessee • viralviral adviral advertisingviral marketing tactics

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JULY 2012

21 year old Valeria Lukyanova wants to be a real-life Barbie doll

"Most little girls grow up playing with Barbie dolls. Some even want to look like them. One 21–year–old has become one, or so she says.

Valeria Lukyanova has become an internet sensation in her home country of Russia, claiming on her blog to be the most famed woman on the Russian–language internet.

Her doll–like features, long blonde hair and 'perfect' body make her look like a real life Barbie."

(Laura Cox, PUBLISHED: 18:14, 22 April 2012 | UPDATED: 01:40, 25 April 2012, Dailymail.co.uk)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JUNE 2012

Late Soviet era girl next door photo book 'Sverstnitsa' (Peer Girls)

"Сейчас, спустя 22–25 лет, рубрика смотрится уже по–другому – как слепок эпохи, и можно даже проследить общее движение нравов от консервативного идеала "русской красавицы" кондово–советского периода журнала – к раскованности и менее стандартным типажам в купальниках. Хотя, надо отметить, что редактора очень осторожно и редко отклонялись от европейского типажа в пользу азиатского, но и такое немного было."

[A series of girl next door 'pin–up images' demonstrating the liberalisation of sexual attitudes in late Soviet era.]

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TAGS

1980s19891990bachelorettecheesecake • cultural liberalisation • cultural norms • English Russia (blog) • eroticismgender performance culture • girl next door • glamour magazineglamour shotliberal attitude • liberalisation • liberalisation of sexual attitudes • liberalismmens magazine • Peer Girls (magazine) • photo book • picture bookpin-uprepresentation of womenRussian culturesexual agencysexualisationSoviet eraSoviet popular culture • stone-washed jeans • Sverstnitsa (magazine) • teenage girlsUSSR • vintage glamor shot • young women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2012

Peggy Orenstein on our gender performance culture

"Peggy Orenstein ('Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie–Girl Culture') and Kaveri Subrahmanyam ('Digital Youth: The Role of Media in Development') had a conversation about girl culture and digital media for Googlers in Santa Monica on February 9, 2011. They were joined by Adriana Manago, who works with Kaveri at the Children's Digital Media Center (UCLA/CSULA)."
(About @Google Talks, 9 February 2011)

Fig.1 Kaveri Subrahmanyam talks to Peggy Orenstein about "Cinderella Ate My Daughter", About @Google Talks [18:24]

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Adriana Manago • Barbie Fashion Designer • boredomboys • bullying • chat roomCinderella • Cinderella Ate My Daughter • culture of prettydesiredigital mediadigital youthdoll playempowermentFacebookfeminismgendergender performance culture • girlhood • girlsGoogle Inc • Google Talks • identity • identity development • Kaveri Subrahmanyam • Lord and Taylor • market segmentationmedia literacy • media researcher • new medianew technology • nursery colours • overcoding • parent • Peggy Orenstein • performance cultureperformativitypinkpink and prettyplaying with dolls • popular zeitgeist • pornographyprettysextingsexual agencysexualisationsexualitysocial mediasocialisation • Tyler Clementi • young girl

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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