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Which clippings match 'University Education' keyword pg.1 of 1
15 JANUARY 2014

Why online education is mostly a fantasy

"If you listen to the advocates of online learning, MOOCs and Internet–based courses will cure all of our education problems. Just hand out some Android tablets, stream some courses in Python, and sit back and watch as everyone magically becomes a highly productive knowledge worker propelling the United States to new heights of economic prosperity. But this vision of online learning is so ridiculous I'm waiting for Ricardo Montalban to show up in a white suit and welcome these people to Fantasy Island.

The online education utopians ignore the fact that free learning has existed for decades in the form of the public library and despite that availability, every kid within bicycling distance to his local branch didn't turn into a self taught entrepreneur. Suggesting that online courses are the cure–all for our educational needs is like saying all you have to do to teach kids in the ghetto is give away textbooks on the corner."

(Francisco Dao, 25 April 2013, PandoDaily)

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TAGS

2013 • Android tablet • at-risk learner • availabilitybricks and mortar • classroom based students • completion • completion rates • cost effective • course completion • cure all • cure-all • economic prosperity • education problems • educational needs • face-to-face instruction • Fantasy Island (television) • fixed structure • free learning • Hallie Bateman • highly productive • Internet-based courses • knowledge workerMinerva ProjectMOOCsmotivationmotivational needsonline courseonline educationonline learning • online movement • online programme • online students • PandoDaily • physical campuses • public library • real world student interaction • Ricardo Montalban • self-motivated • self-taught • sense of belonging • time flexibility • universityuniversity educationutopian technological prophecy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JANUARY 2013

Monsters University: Pixar parody of college recruitment ads

"This is delightful: a campaign by Pixar for its upcoming film Monsters University that spoofs those wonderfully cheesy college–recruitment ads that air during NCAA sporting events. The spot below, which ran during this week's Rose Bowl telecast, promotes the movie's eponymous institution and imitates the source material perfectly, from the tagline ('Image you at MU') to the awkwardly saccharine student testimonials. The whole spot is nicely paced ahead of the amusing reveal halfway through. (The realism of the animation helps a ton, too, and is its own best marketing for the film.) The website, monstersuniversity.com/edu, is quite brilliantly done as well. The 'Student Policies' section is particularly inspired. On the issue of 'Basic Monster Respect,' it offers this advice: 'All monsters are unique – by heritage, number of appendages, or simply number of eyes – and all monsters deserve respect.' Pets, it should be noted, are not allowed on campus, 'with the exception of seeing–eye snakes.'"

(Tim Nudd, 03 January 2013, Adweek)

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TAGS

20133D animationAdweekanimationcampus • campus life • character animationcollege • college recruitment • conventional universitiesfake university • film marketing • fraternityfreshmenhumourhyperbolemonster • Monsters University • movieparody • Pixar • promotional materialpromotional video • saccharine • satirical illustrationspoof • student admissions • student enthusiasm • student testimonials • student viewsstudentsuniversity • university campus • university education • university recruitment • university students

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 DECEMBER 2012

The Value of Culture: Culture and Anarchy

"Melvyn Bragg presents the first in a series of programmes examining the idea of culture and its evolution over the last 150 years. In 1869 the poet and critic Matthew Arnold published Culture and Anarchy, a series of essays in which he argued passionately that culture – 'the best which has been thought and said' – was a powerful force for good. In this first programme Melvyn Bragg visits the Sheldonian Theatre in Oxford, where Arnold first unveiled his ideas on the subject, and discovers how Arnold's ideas were refined and rejected by later thinkers."

(Melvyn Bragg, 2012)

Matthew Arnold (1869). "Culture and Anarchy: An Essay in Political and Social Criticism" [http://www.authorama.com/book/culture–and–anarchy.html].

"The Value of Culture: Culture and Anarchy", Radio broadcast, Episode 1 of 5, Duration: 42 minutes, First broadcast: Monday 31 December 2012, Presenter/Melvyn Bragg, Producer/Thomas Morris for the BBC Radio 4, UK.

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TAGS

1869 • 2012access to learning • arriviste • BBC Radio 4cultural and political changecultural changecultural historycultural valuecultureCulture and Anarchy • force for good • high culturehistory of ideas • ideas refined and rejected by later thinkers • Matthew ArnoldMelvyn Braggpopular culture • proliferation of universities • radio broadcast • red brick status • red brick university • redbrick universityRussell Group • series of essays • Sheldonian Theatre in Oxford • the idea of culture • The Value of Culture (radio) • Thomas Morris • university education • university status

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 DECEMBER 2012

University students face a constant stream of questionnaires designed to assess the standard of their courses

"I'm more bothered by the underlying assumptions about what makes good university teaching that lie behind many of these surveys. You can see them particularly clearly in the National Student Survey, and the reams of student feedback it publishes online – explicitly, so it says, to help prospective students choose a good course, and to help universities 'enhance the student learning experience'. ...

OK, I can see how at first sight that might seem obvious. Who, after all, wants to see their kids go off to university, at great expense, for a diet of dis–satisfaction? But, from where I sit, dissatisfaction and discomfort have their own, important, role to play in a good university education. We're aiming to push our students to think differently, to move out of their intellectual comfort zone, to read and discuss texts that are almost too hard for them to manage. It is, and it's meant to be, destabilizing.

At the same time, we're urging them never to be satisfied with the arguments they are presented with, never to take things on trust, always to challenge, always to see the weak points, or to want to push the argument further. Then along comes the National Survey, treats them as consumers, and asks them if they're satisfied."

(Mary Beard, BBC News, 2 December 2012)

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TAGS

2012anonymityassumptionsbureaucratic reductionchallenging conventional thinkingcomfort zoneconsumer culturecriticismcustomer satisfactiondepersonalising • destabilizing • discontent • dissatisfactionHigher Education Funding Council • honesty • Mary Beard • National Student Surveyperformativitypower without responsibilityquestionnaire • RateMyProfessor • satisfaction • satisfied consumers • satisfied students • student feedback • student learning experience • suggestions • surveysurvey form • survey-fatigue • surveysteaching • think differently • TripAdvisor • trusttrust and reliabilityundergraduateuniversityuniversity educationuniversity teaching • useful comments

CONTRIBUTOR

Phil Nodding
10 FEBRUARY 2012

Culture Jamming: University of Bums on Seats

"Welcome to the University of Bums on Seats, where we believe that nobody should be exempt from a university education. As Vice Chancellor here for the past 13 months, I have attempted to revolutionise our educational paradigm to ensure a rich diversity of abilities are represented in our student body.

It is never too late to start your education. Even at this late point in the academic year, we have many vacancies for degree–courses. We pride ourselves on our 'character–over–qualifications' admissions policy which ensures that no–one will be rejected on any grounds except non–payment of fees.

Unlike many conventional universities, our modern, economical approach to teaching is delivered by the latest computerised teaching–aids, graduate assistants, and other budget–conscious methods.

We particularly welcome applications from overseas students, and we are proud to be one of the very few universities which does not require proficiency in English as a pre–requisite to enrol.

If you have ever considered investing in your future by gaining the qualifications you may have missed earlier in life, then now is the time to apply. No questions asked.

We look forward to receiving your tuition fees."

(Prof Alan Dubious)

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TAGS

admissions • admissions policy • budget-conscious • buy a degreeconventional universitiescritical commentarycritiqueculture jamming • cynical • cynical revenue-gathering exercise • economical approach to teaching • English proficiency • exploitationfakefake university • fees • graduate assistants • humour • investing in your future • no questions asked • online learningparody • qualification • teaching-aids • tuition feesuniversity education • University of Bums on Seats

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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