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Which clippings match 'Melbourne' keyword pg.1 of 4
17 JULY 2015

Came by Boat: Vietnamese refugee who calls Australia home

"The riveting story of fleeing war-torn Vietnam for the safety of Australia, winner of the Audience Award in the Australian Shorts section at the Human Rights Arts Film Festival."

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2014 • Alisa Woraprangkul • Asia Pacific • asylumAustraliaboat • boat people • Carmen Holman • documentary filmhuman rights • Human Rights Arts Film Festival • immigration • Indochina • Malcolm Bloedel • Malcolm Fraser • Marleena Forward • Melbourne • Ning Xue • Peter Frost • refugee • refugee crisis • Shannon Owen • Steve Thomas • Then I Came by Boat (2014) • Tri Nguyen • Victorian College of the ArtsVietnamVietnam warVietnamese • Vietnamese boat people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2015

William Barak apartment tower portrait revealed

"After six months under wraps, a 31–storey portrait of indigenous leader William Barak was momentarily revealed to the world on Monday. The 85–metre face has been created in the balconies of a new Grocon apartment building at the former Carlton United and Brewery site on Swanston Street. ...

William Barak was an elder of Melbourne's Wurundjeri tribe, an artist and social justice leader, credited with 'building a bridge between black and white culture'. He died in 1903."

(Aisha Dow, 3 March 2015, The Age)

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19032015apartment block • apartment building • apartment project • apartment tower • architectural facade • Ashton Raggatt McDougall (architects) • Australia • balcony • beardblock printing • Carlton United and Breweries • concrete balconies • Coranderrk • Daniel Grollo • David Waldren • dead indigenous people • facadeface • facial features • Grocon apartment building • Howard Raggatt • Indigenous elder • indigenous leader • Indigenous people • line of sight • Lonsdale Street • Melbourne • moustache • optical effectperceptual organisation • portrait building • Shine of Remembrance • social justice leader • Swanston Street • The Age (newspaper) • tribal chief • vantage pointvisual likeness • William Barak • Wurundjeri community • Wurundjeri elders • Wurundjeri tribe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JANUARY 2015

Melbourne youth subculture: before punk there were Sharpies

"An extension of the UK skinhead movement, the roots of sharp lie in the influx of European immigrants in Australia in the early 1960s. By the late 1960s the Sharpie subculture had evolved and existed in the mainly working class and migrant inner city suburbs such as Richmond, Fitzroy, Collingwood and Brunswick where Greeks, Italians, Yogoslavs and English immigrants all lived side by side. But as street corners gradually changed to shopping centres, by the early 1970s, the Sharpie movement started to spread to the outer suburbs of Melbourne where a 'rough as guts' working class ethos existed.

The name 'Sharpie' originated from the fashion. It was all about the clothes and looking sharp, and flash. The first wave of Sharpies from 1966 – 1969 were strongly influenced by UK Mod fashions, the 1964 Rockers and the style of certain Italian migrants. Demeanor was tough, hair was short back and sides and clothing was custom made by European tailors, thus allowing for a blend of neo–thirties suave combined with a contemporary larrikin attitude. Dances were also a big part of the Sharpies social fabric, with bands such as Billy Thorpe & the Aztecs, Wild Cherries, Ray Brown & the Whispers, and Max Merritt & the Meteors being popular choices.

From 1970–1980, the second wave of Sharpies were following hard, tough rock'n'roll bands like Lobby Loyde and the Coloured Balls, Buster Brown, Rose Tattoo, The Angels and ACDC. Sharpies were now often congregating in large numbers, regularly attending live band concerts at town hall and high school dances as well as early discos. But due to their sheer numbers, Sharpies were often perceived as being untouchable by the police and were often associated with excessive violence, regularly taking part in fights."

(Melynda von Wayward)

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1960s1970s • ACDC (band) • Australiabelonging • Billy Thorpe and the Aztecs (band) • British Australian • Brunswick (Victoria) • Buster Brown (band) • Carol Jerrems • clothesclothing fashion • Collingwood (Victoria) • Coloured Balls (band) • counterculturecultural codescustom madedisaffected youth • disco • European immigrants • European style • excessive violence • Fitzroy (Victoria) • Greek Australian • Heidelberg Technical College • high school dance • identity performanceinner city • inner city suburbs • Italian Australian • Italian immigrant • larrikin • larrikin attitude • Lobby Loyde (band) • looking sharp • Max Merritt and the Meteors (band) • Melbourne • Melynda von Wayward • mod fashionmullet • outer suburbs • protopunk • punk rockpunk rock ethos • Ray Brown and the Whispers (band) • Richmond (Victoria) • rock n roll • rockers • Rose Tattoo (band) • rough as guts • sharpie movement • sharpie subculture • sharpies • shopping centre • sideburns • skinheadsocial fabricstyle • suave • subculture • The Angels (band) • town hallurban clothingVictoria (Australia) • Wild Cherries (band) • working classworking class culture • working class ethos • youth cultureyouth subculture • Yugoslav

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JUNE 2013

The NFSA Life In Australia Series

Fig.1 James Jeffrey (1966). "Life In Australia: Adelaide": 20.25 Minutes. Made by The Commonwealth Film Unit / Department of Immigration 1966. Directed by James Jeffrey. A picture of life in the South Australian capital of Adelaide in the mid 1960s, social, commercial and recreational.
Fig.2 "Life In Australia: Brisbane", Fig.3 "Guide To Canberra", Fig.4 "Darwin – Doorway To Australia", Fig.5 "Life In Australia: Hobart", Fig.6 "Life In Australia: Melbourne", Fig.7 "Life In Australia: Perth", Fig.8 "Life In Australia: Sydney".

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1960s1966Adelaideadvertising imagesaudio and visual heritageaudiovisual archiveAustralia • Australian capital cities • Australian culture • Australian Department of Immigration • Australian ScreenBrisbaneCanberracommercial sector • Commonwealth Film Unit • cultural life • Darwin • Eric Thompson • European Australianseveryday cultureGreat Britain • Hobart • idylidyllic imageimmigrantimmigration • James Jeffrey • life in Australia • Life in Australia Series • lifestyleMelbourneNational Archives of AustraliaNational Film and Sound ArchivenewsreelNFSAPerthportrait of everyday liferecreational activitiessocial sectorSouth AustraliaSydney • ten pound pom • ten pound tourist • UK • welcoming immigrants • white Australia policy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2012

Dumb Ways to Die ad becomes surprise hit

"'Set fire to your hair, poke a stick at a grizzly bear ... Dumb ways to die ... dumb ways to die–ie–ie.' If the chorus isn't stuck in your head, it will be soon. Melbourne Metro Trains' darkly cute – and irksomely catchy – new ad for transport safety has gone viral, notching up a whopping 4.2 million YouTube views in less than a week. And nobody is more stunned by its success than the man behind the music, Sydneysider Ollie McGill. The Cat Empire keyboards player was commissioned to write the score to accompany lyrics to the McCann Group's new ad and has watched Facebook likes, Twitter shares and YouTube hits skyrocket as word of the animated video has spread like wildfire. ... In the ad, cartoon characters meet their ends in a number of colourful, sardonic ways, including a couple of nasty mishaps on train tracks, while the sweet chorus, 'dumb ways to die ... ' is instant earworm material."

(Daisy Dumas, 19 November 2012, Fairfax New Zealand Ltd.)

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20122D animationadadvertisementanimated videoanimationAustraliabearblack humourcartooncartoon characters • catchy • character animationcomedydark comedy • darkly cute • deathdie • dumb • dumb ways to die • earworm • episodic structuregone viral • Horrible Histories • humouriTunesMcCann Groupmeet their endsMelbourne • Melbourne Metro Trains • mistakes to avoidmusic videonasty mishaps • Ollie McGill • parablepublic service announcementsafety • sardonic • songwriter • stupid deaths • The Cat Empire • traintrain station • train tracks • transport safety • Wahroonga

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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