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Which clippings match 'Design Innovation' keyword pg.1 of 4
20 DECEMBER 2013

Kirby Ferguson: Embracing the remix

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2012Android OSAppleauthorship • behavioural finance theory • Bill BuxtonBob Dylan • borrow • Brian Burton • building on the work of others • Carter Family • celebrated creators • citation as a form of persuasioncopycopyingcopyrightcopyright law • core technology • creative workscreativitycultural productiondesign innovation • Dominic Behan • everything is a remix • good artists copy great artists steal • graphical user interfacegreat ideasHenry FordiPhone • Jean Ritchie • Jeff Han • Kirby Ferguson • loss aversion • multi-fingered gestures • multi-touch technologiesnew medianothing is original • Nottamun Town • originalityoriginality is non-existentownershipPablo Picasso • patent law • patent registration • Paul Clayton • private property • property analogy • remixremix cultureremixingrip • shameless stealing • standing on the shoulders of giants • stealing • Steve Jobs • stolen product • TED Talks • Woody Guthrie • Xerox PARC

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2013

DesFi (Design Fictions) MA study at QUT

"I use the term 'DesFi' as a play on 'SciFi'. In that 'SciFi' narratives and visualisations are fictional scenarios based on scientific discoveries and discussions. Im particularly interested in how the genre of 'science fiction' can provide an example approach for design students to consider when they are conceptualising potential designs for future contexts.

The DesFi approach allows design students to put aside existing limitations… such as current issues around voice recognition, language translators or even access to personal data. These limitations are based in technical, political and sometimes ethical arguments that, although undeniably critical to design feasibility, can suspend design innovations if we only consider the policies, technologies and processes that exist right now.

My premise to the students is that such contemporary concerns may be solved by another discipline in the near or far future. Consequently, attitudes will shift, new technologies will emerge and the criteria and inventory for design specifications will change.

Limiting our design ideas to current issues may dilute the potential for innovation… but more importantly, by prototyping great imaginative design solutions, we can increase the demand for change through demonstrating the possibilities that emerge from overcoming the conditions and contingencies of designing products for only todays market and todays user."

(Deb Polson, 25 November 2013)

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2009AustraliaBruce Sterlingcommunication design education • contemporary concerns • Debra Polson • DesFi • DesFi prototypes • DesFi tangents • design educators • design feasibility • design fictions • Design Fictions (course) • design innovation • design specifications • design students • design studio programme • designing products • designing prototypes • diegetic prototypes • ethical arguments • fantasticfictional scenariosfuture contextshistory of ideasimaginative design solutions • Interactive and Visual Design Course • Julian BleeckerMA • Masters of Creative Industries • near future design • new technologies • potential designs • prototypingQUTsci-fiscience fictionscientific discoveriesscientific observationsspeculative designsuspend disbeliefwhat if

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 NOVEMBER 2013

Applying Heidegger's Philosophy to Design

"Heidegger's philosophy offers what is arguably the most thorough account of the process of human understanding available. Although his analysis of interpretation is useful if one is to understand activities like innovative design, it never addresses the realm of design directly. Heidegger discusses interpretation at a high level of generality and chooses his examples from interactions between people and physical artifacts, like the use of hammers by carpenters. He is concerned with the nature of understandingly being in the world. While a person's world includes conceptual and imaginative realms like design, Heidegger's examples primarily come from the world of physical artifacts which can be encountered perceptually. ...

Heidegger treats artifacts in the world the same way he would treat design artifacts on the drawing board. That is, he is not really concerned with them as physically present objects of perception. On the contrary, his main effort philosophically is to distinguish artifacts–in–use from traditional conceptions of physically–present–objects. For example, a hammer in use is not understood by the carpenter as an observed object with physical attributes, but is skillfully applied to the activities of the current situation. Furthermore, this skillful use takes place within the context of future–oriented plans and desires, such as the anticipation of the item that is under construction. This is similar to components of a design, which are skillfully arranged in terms of their relationships to other design components and within the context of the anticipated final design. Marks in a design sketch, for instance, are important for their roles within a network of significances, rather than for their physical properties as lines. Interpretation of both physical artifacts and designs is situated. ...

The notion of breakdown in action plays a rather small role in Heidegger's analysis of human understanding. Heidegger uses examples of breakdown in order to make explicit the network of references among artifacts that are only present tacitly under conditions of normal use. Yet, the notion of breakdown has been elevated to central importance in the theories that have tried to adopt Heidegger's analysis to a theory of design and to operationalize this theory for computer support. Thus, breakdown plays an important role in Schön (1985), Winograd & Flores (1986), Suchman (1987), Ehn (1988), Budde & Züllighoven (1990), McCall, Morch, & Fischer (1990), Dreyfus (1991), Coyne & Snodgrass (1991), Fischer & Nakakoji (1992).

The fact that so many writers influenced by Heidegger have focused on breakdown does not provide multiple independent support for this emphasis. ... most of these writers have been influenced by Heidegger only indirectly–either through Dreyfus or through Schön. If one looks closely at the discussions of breakdown in Dreyfus and Schön, one can note an ambiguity in whether they are speaking about a (ontological) breakdown in the network of references or a (practical) breakdown in action. Dreyfus is certainly aware of the ontological role of breakdown, but he is concerned to make his presentation acceptable to an American audience, trained in the rationalist tradition. For the sake of concreteness, he uses examples that stress the breakdown in action. Schön is also aware of the ontological ramifications, but he has couched his discussion in terms of action (e.g., knowing–in–action, reflection–in–action), so it often seems that his examples of breakdown exemplify breakdowns in action rather than breakdowns in situated understanding. Given that it is easier to operationalize breakdowns in action than breakdowns in situated understanding, it is not surprising that people interested in producing practical results from Dreyfus or Schön's theories would tend to emphasize the action–oriented reading of the ambiguous discussions."

(Gerry Stahl, 5 January 2004)

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action-oriented reading • Adrian Snodgrass • Anders Morch • anticipation • artefacts-in-use • being-in-the-worldbreakdown • breakdown in action • breakdown in the network of references • breakdowns in action • breakdowns in situated understanding • carpenter • conceptual domain • concreteness • current situationdesign artefactsdesign innovation • design sketch • design theoryDonald Schon • drawing board • Fernando Floresflow • Gerhard Fischer • Gerry Stahl • hammer • Heinz Zullighoven • Hubert Dreyfushuman perception • human understanding • innovative design • knowing-in-action • Kumiyo Nakakoji • Lucy Suchman • Martin Heidegger • nature of understanding • network of references • network of significances • normal use • objects of perception • Pelle Ehn • philosophy of design • physical artefacts • physical attributes • physical properties • physically present • physically-present-objects • rationalist tradition • Raymond McCall • reflection-in-action • Reinhard Budde • Richard Coynesituated construction of realitysituated knowledgessketching ideas • skillful use • Terry Winogradtheory of design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 NOVEMBER 2013

FlyKly: Kickstarter proposal for a Smart Wheel with app integration

"Smart Wheel is a pedal assist which means it helps you ride your bike effortlessly. The motor turns on when you start pedaling and begins accelerating to your desired speed. It stops when you stop. It saves you time by getting you to your destination faster and gets you there without losing your breath or breaking a sweat. ...

FlyKly App allows you to control and monitor the Smart Wheel. It also offers many other features like safety, support and social connectivity. It's available for free for iOS and Android devices with Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity and for the Pebble Watch."

(Niko Klansek, FlyKly)

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all-in-oneAndroid OS • app integration • bicyclebicycle wheelsbluetoothconnectivity • cycling habits • Darko Osterversnik • data collectiondesign innovation • dynamo • e-bike • electric bicycle • electric motor • environmentally conscious design • FlyKly • FlyKly App • GPS monitoring • integrated electric wheeliOS • Janez Frantar • Kickstarter proposal • Klemen Nagode • light weight • livable cities • Marko Jurincic • Matej Colja • motor • Niko Klansek • pedal assist • Peter Frantar • Peter Osterversnik • product designprototype • Rok Cresnik • Samo Frantar • SloveniaSlovenian • smartwatch • social connectivity • technology innovation • The Pebble (watch) • ubiquitous computingurban sustainabilitywheel

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

UK start-up product design agency Made In Mind

"Made in Mind was founded in 2009 by Matthew Judkins and Min–Kyu Choi. The duo met on the campuses of Imperial College and the Royal College of Art and formed the company to commercialise the Folding Plug design concept that Min–Kyu developed during his studies. Numerous individuals and organisations joined Matthew and Min–Kyu along the way to contribute to the development, funding and marketing of the concept which was realised in 2012 with the launch of the Mu. Made in Mind, now consisting of a diverse team of industry and technical professionals, are in the process of extending the product pipeline and placing the Mu on the global stage."

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2009AC power plugadapterscommercialisationcompact designdesign conceptdesign innovation • folding plug • Imperial College Londonindustrial designMA Product Design • Made in Mind • Matthew Judkins • Min-Kyu Choiminiaturisation • Mu USB Charger • product designredesignRoyal College of Artstart-up businessUK • USB Smartphone charger

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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