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Which clippings match 'National Curriculum' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 JANUARY 2015

Barclays Bank Code Playground

"We've built an online playground where kids can start to discover coding. It's a safe place where young explorers can try their hand at fun activities that are based on simple coding principles. Whet their appetite today."

(Barclays Bank)

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201421st century literaciesadvertising campaignbankBarclays Bank • Barclays Code Playground • basics of coding • childrencoding • coding principles • coding session • computer programming educationdesign and technology • Digital Eagles • digital skillsdigital skills for the future • discover coding • engineering and design • fun challenges • learn to codenational curriculum • online playground • scriptingtechnology educationtechnology instruction • young explorers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2012

Immersive underwater experience for high school students

"The Virtual Reef is a life–sized marine ecosystem expanding across two levels of the new Science and Engineering Centre. Multi–touch technologies enable the user to manipulate, intimately explore and interact with the reef world, specific behaviours and relationships.

Australia's leading marine science and interactive and visual design organisations, QUT and the Queensland Museum, bring knowledge and research of the underwater world to your fingertips through multi–touch screens and projectors.

Users will have the opportunity to go beyond the cinematic experience and interact with the marine world. Each interaction has associated content designed to complement the aims of the National Curriculum and provide an exploratory learning experience."

(Jeff Jones, the Cube, QUT)

Fig.1 "The Virtual Reef" project team: Professor Jeff Jones (Cube Project Leader), Associate Professor Michael Docherty (Project Leader), Warwick Mellow (Principal Animator/Art Director), Joti Carroll, Paul Gaze, Sean Gobey, Ben Alldridge, Sophia Carroll, Sherwin Huang, Bryce Christensen.

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20123Danimation • art director • asset creation • Australia • Ben Alldridge • Bryce Christensen • character rigging • cinematic experience • creaturedigital engagementdigital technologyecologyecosystemexperience designexploratory learning experienceexplore and interactfish • Great Barrier Reef • healthy oceanshigh schoolimmersive environmentsimmersive experienceinteractioninteractive displayintimate interactionJeff JonesJoti Carroll • life-sized • marine • marine ecosystem • marine science • marine world • Michael Docherty • multi-touch screenmulti-touch technologiesnational curriculumnatural environment • Paul Gaze • Queensland Museum • Queensland University of TechnologyQUTQUT Cube Projectsreefresearch projectresource for studentsScience and Engineering Centre • scientific exploration • scientific visualisation • Sean Gobey • Sherwin Huang • simulated experience • Sophia Carroll • The Cube Projects • The Virtual Reef • underwater • underwater experience • underwater world • user experience design (UX)virtual heritagevisual representations of scientific conceptsvisualisationWarwick Mellowwildlife

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2012

UK Reviewing the new Design & Technology Curriculum

Reviewing the new Design & Technology Curriculum
Westminster Education Forum National Curriculum Seminar Series 2013
Timing: Morning, Wednesday, 13th February 2013
Venue: Central London

"As the Government concludes its National Curriculum review, this timely seminar focuses on the content of the new curriculum for Design and Technology (D&T) for each Key Stage, due to be introduced into schools from September 2014 – as well as the implementation challenges for schools. It will bring together key policymakers with school and college leaders, teaching unions, universities, employers and other stakeholders.

Delegates will assess the opportunities and challenges presented by D&T's designation as a 'foundation' subject, with a much less prescriptive Programme of Study, as well as the level of teaching time required to deliver the new Programme and whether it meets the needs of employers, colleges and universities.

Sessions also focus on wider issues in D&T including the quality of facilities available in both primary and secondary schools in England, the profile and CPD opportunities for D&T teachers and the role that industry can play in the delivery of D&T in schools."

(Westminster Education Forum, UK)

Fig.1 Chicago Middle School students participate in an invention school workshop led by James Dyson as the James Dyson Foundation begins its mission to encourage more American students to become future engineers and inventors, at the Sir Miles Davis Academy in Chicago, May 5, 2011 [http://momandmore.com/2011/05/james–dyson–foundation–just–launched.html].

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20132014 • Academy of Culinary Arts • Bel Reed • Bill Nicholl • CPDcurriculumcurriculum delivery • David Anderson • Department for Education • design and construction • design and technologyDesign and Technology AssociationDesign Council (UK) • DT • EBacceducation policyengineering and designEnglandEnglish Baccalaureate • foundation subject • Gina White • Government • implementation challenges • innovation and creativity • Institution of Mechanical Engineers • Isobel Pollock • IT • key stage • lateral thinking • lobbying • national curriculum • National Curriculum Seminar Series • North Baddesley Junior School • Ofsted • policy makersprimary schoolproblem-solving • programme of study • public policy • purposeful activities • Queen Elizabeths Grammar School • Richard Green • Royal Academy of Engineering • Sara Jayne Stanes • school leaders • secondary school • Susan Smith • synthetic thinkingtechnology educationUKUK GovernmentuniversitiesUniversity of CambridgeUniversity of Leeds • WEET • WEETF • WeF • Westminster Education Forum • Westminster Forum Projects • WFNF • WFP • WHF • Whitehall • WLPF • WMF

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 FEBRUARY 2012

Australian cultural policy: a model for the UK

"Last November I visited Australia and the arts community was buzzing with talk about the country's proposed new cultural policy. So I took a look at the discussion document and I turned green with envy – why can't we have one of these in the UK?

In Britain we've never been good at framing a coherent approach to culture. Back in 1996 a senior civil servant at the Department for National Heritage told the Sunday Times: 'It is not part of our culture to think in terms of a cultural policy,' and not much has changed.

The Australian example shows what can be done. It's a remarkable and mercifully brief document that has many virtues.

First, it sets out the beliefs on which any serious cultural policy must be founded: 'The arts and creative industries are fundamental to Australia's identity as a society and nation, and increasingly to our success as a national economy.' It adds that 'the policy will be based on an understanding that a creative nation produces a more inclusive society and a more expressive and confident citizenry.'

Everything that follows in the document is built on this bedrock of ideology. Without such clear and transparent beliefs, and the commitment that flows from them, policies are doomed to endless wrangling about measurement and evidence.

But the document does acknowledge evidence where it exists, and uses it wisely. For example: 'Research shows that arts education encourages academic achievement and improves students' self–esteem, leading to more positive engagement with school and the broader community and higher school retention rates' – therefore 'the new national curriculum will ensure that young Australians have access to learning in the creative arts.'

But in the UK we have to suffer the non–evidence based approach of abolishing what went before just because the other lot invented it.

The next virtue is that the proposed policy not only encompasses the arts, heritage and creative industries, but extends into other areas like education and infrastructure. Culture is deemed relevant to every department of government, from the role that it plays in international relations (British Foreign and Commonwealth Office) to its economic importance (HM Treasury), from its impact on the need to build airports for cultural tourists (Department for Communities and Local Goverment) to cultural scholarship in Higher Education (Department for Education).

That relevance is a two–way street: for example, the cultural uses of high speed broadband affect hard infrastructural requirements, while the existence of the hardware creates cultural opportunities."

(John Holden, Monday 6 February 2012)

Fig.1 Australia's 1988 Bicentennial $10 Note.

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academic achievementaccess to learningarts • arts and creative industries • arts communityarts educationarts policyAustralia • Australian example • beliefs • British Foreign and Commonwealth Office • coherent approach • confident citizenry • creative artscreative industriesCreative Nationcultural identity • cultural opportunities • cultural policy • cultural scholarship • cultural tourism • cultural uses • Department for Communities and Local Goverment • Department for Education • Department for National Heritage • evidence based policy • expressive citizenry • heritage • high speed broadband • higher education • HM Treasury • ideology • inclusive society • infrastructural requirements • measurement and evidence • national curriculumnational economy • positive engagement • self-esteem • society and nation • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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