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23 OCTOBER 2012

Small business marketing: tweeting globally, accessed locally

"SAN FRANCISCO – Three weeks after Curtis Kimball opened his crème brûlée cart in San Francisco, he noticed a stranger among the friends in line for his desserts. How had the man discovered the cart? He had read about it on Twitter.

For Mr. Kimball, who conceded that he 'hadn't really understood the purpose of Twitter,' the beauty of digital word–of–mouth marketing was immediately clear. He signed up for an account and has more than 5,400 followers who wait for him to post the current location of his itinerant cart and list the flavors of the day, like lavender and orange creamsicle.

'I would love to say that I just had a really good idea and strategy, but Twitter has been pretty essential to my success,' he said. He has quit his day job as a carpenter to keep up with the demand.

Much has been made of how big companies like Dell, Starbucks and Comcast use Twitter to promote their products and answer customers' questions. But today, small businesses outnumber the big ones on the free microblogging service, and in many ways, Twitter is an even more useful tool for them."

(Claire Cain Miller, 22 July 2009, New York Times)

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TAGS

ad budget • advertising and marketing • advertising strategy • being discovered • big companies • cart • Coca-Cola • Comcast • creme brulee cart • current location • Curtis Kimball • customers • Dell • desserts • digital word-of-mouth marketing • e-commerce business • fresh • itinerant cart • little-bitty store • little-bitty town • local businesslocal businesseslocalisationMcDonaldsmicroblogging • mom-and-pop shops • multiplatform marketers • New York Times • promote products • San Franciscoshopping behavioursmall businesssmall businesses • small-business owners • social mediaStarbucks • supersmall businesses • sushi restaurant • tactical engagementTweetDeckTwitter • Twitter followers • Twitter localisation • Umi (restaurant) • word of mouth • word-of-mouth • word-of-mouth promotion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2011

The evolution of Postmodernism

"On the way to postmodern, the struggle to reform modern capitalism's dark side, fragmented into a thousand strands. An era approach is rejected – dating the arrival of postmodernism is impossible as is the construction of a linear episodic narrative, moving from the premodern to the modern and then to postmodern. Instead postmodern methods, theories, and worldviews proliferate, as do modern and premodern ones. There are numerous postmodern approaches ranging from naive postmodernism (McPostmodernism) that hails the arrival of postindustrial and complex/adaptive organizations, Baudrillard's and Lyotard's versions of radical breaks from modernity, to others seeking more integration with critical theory. Some claim to have moved beyond postmodern to something called postpostmodern that would include hybrids (postmodern variants with modern and premodern), language 'heteroglossia' (the coexistence of many voices at the same time in tension with each other), and various 'dark side postmoderns' looking at global reterritorialization, postmodern war, postcolonialism and the ills of capitalism"

(David M. Boje, 2007)

1). Postmodernism – by David M. Boje (2007) To appear in Yiannis Gabriel's Thesaurus, London: Oxford University Press, forthcoming

TAGS

Bruno Latourcapitalismconsumption spectaclecritical theorycritiquedeconstruction • Douglas Kellner • episodic narrative • Fredric Jameson • Gibson Burrell • grand narrativesGulf WarGuy Debordheteroglossia • history of philosophy • iPodJacques DerridaJean BaudrillardJean-Francois LyotardJurgen HabermaslanguageLas Vegas • Linda Smircich • Marta B Calas • McDonalds • McPostmodernism • Michel FoucaultmodernismmodernityNietzscheNikePeter Druckerpost-structuralismpostindustrialPostmodernpostmodernismpremodernreterritorialisation • Steven Best • Stewart R. Clegg • Vietnam war • Wal-Mart • William Bergquist • World War IWorld War II

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 NOVEMBER 2009

McDonald's lenticular bus shelters

"DE Group and Impressions International collaborated on a project commissioned by DDB on behalf of McDonald's Australia.

McDonald's was looking for a stand–out advertising solution for bus shelters in order to promote its new ''McDonald's 24 hour store'' concept – as now several of them McDonald's are open 24/7, and the rest are open at least 18 hours a day.

The project imagined by DDB featured a flip effect based on 2 images: passers–by could see a young man yawning and then eating a hamburger...

The backlit billboards – 1,88*1,10 m – were produced using 15 LPI lenses (particularly suitable for a flip effect). The project lasted 3 weeks and finally 7 billboards were implemented in main centres throughout New Zealand."

(HumanEyes Technologies Ltd.)

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TAGS

24/7ad spaceadvertisinganimated adAotearoa New ZealandAustralasiaAustraliabillboardbus shelterscreative advertisingDDB • DE Group • flip effect • hamburger • HumanEyes • illusionlenticularlenticular imagerylenticular printingMcDonalds • McDonalds Australia • motionmotion designmovementperspective • Producer3D • tiredness • visual communicationvisual effectsvisualisation • yawn

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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